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Marcus & Co. Art Nouveau Pearl, Diamond and Emerald Brooch

An Art Nouveau brooch with pearls, diamonds and emerald by Marcus & Co. The brooch has 10 semi-spherical pearls, 15 Old European-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of 1.25 carats and a polished emerald drop. Gemological Institute of America certificate #2171449596 states the pearls are natural saltwater button pearls. The multi-generational New York firm of Marcus & Co was founded by an ambitious young German immigrant who had trained at a prominent Dresden court jeweler. In 1892, after working with Charles Lewis Tiffany, Hermann Marcus and his sons William and George together set up a business that soon became a glittering New York society institution renowned not only for its superb diamonds, colored stones and pearls, but also its instantly recognizable, original design style. The firm produced great jewels in the Art Nouveau and Arts & Crafts sensibility, with George, the artist/designer, drawing inspiration from sources as diverse and exotic as the contemporary French masters, the Moghuls and Maharajahs, the garland style of the Ancien Regime, and the genius of Renaissance goldsmiths. George''s distinctive, confident hand was always discernible in Marcus creations. Working as a team with George, his brother William was a gem and pearl connoisseur who travelled the world hunting fine gem material, including purchasing the entire production of never-before-se ... en black opal in Lightning Ridge Australia in 1908. Marcus exhibited at the 1900 Exposition Universelle in Paris, and their work won prizes at the prestigious Society of Arts & Crafts of Boston. Plique-a-jour enamel was an art in which Marcus & Co. excelled, creating jewels with unprecedented three-dimensional depth in this medium. The firm and family were well-known for their charitable activities and promotion of young jewelers such as Raymond Yard.

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Marcus & Co. Art Nouveau Pearl, Diamond and Emerald Brooch

Marcus & Co. Art Nouveau White Opal and Chrysoprase, Plique-à-Jour Enamel and Gold Pendant Brooch

An American Art Nouveau 18 karat gold and enamel pendant brooch with opals and chrysoprase by Marcus & Co.. The pendant brooch has 6 cabochon white opals, 63 cabochon chrysoprase stones and plique-à-jour enamel. Suspended from the brooch is an opal and chrysoprase pendant drop. Detachable brooch finding and flip-down bail. The multi-generational New York firm of Marcus & Co was founded by an ambitious young German immigrant who had trained at a prominent Dresden court jeweler. In 1892, after working with Charles Lewis Tiffany, Hermann Marcus and his sons William and George together set up a business that soon became a glittering New York society institution renowned not only for its superb diamonds, colored stones and pearls, but also its instantly recognizable, original design style. The firm produced great jewels in the Art Nouveau and Arts & Crafts sensibility, with George, the artist/designer, drawing inspiration from sources as diverse and exotic as the contemporary French masters, the Moghuls and Maharajahs, the garland style of the Ancien Regime, and the genius of Renaissance goldsmiths. George''s distinctive, confident hand was always discernible in Marcus creations. Working as a team with George, his brother William was a gem and pearl connoisseur who travelled the world hunting fine gem material, including purchasing the entire production of never-before-seen black ... opal in Lightning Ridge Australia in 1908. Marcus exhibited at the 1900 Exposition Universelle in Paris, and their work won prizes at the prestigious Society of Arts & Crafts of Boston. Plique-a-jour enamel was an art in which Marcus & Co. excelled, creating jewels with unprecedented three-dimensional depth in this medium. The firm and family were well-known for their charitable activities and promotion of young jewelers such as Raymond Yard. Shown in the Poster House (New York) exhibition "Alphonse Mucha: Art Nouveau./Nouvelle Femme," June 20-October 6, 2019.

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Marcus & Co. Art Nouveau White Opal and Chrysoprase, Plique-à-Jour Enamel and Gold Pendant Brooch

Georges Fouquet French Art Nouveau Opal, Pearl, Gold and Plique-à-Jour Enamel Pendant Necklace

A French Art Nouveau gold and plique-à-jour enamel pendant with opals, freshwater and natural pearls by Georges Fouquet. The pendant has 11 opals, 13 freshwater pearls and one natural saltwater pearl. The pendant is designed in a flowing foliate motif with plique-à-jour enamel leaves floating over translucent opals and decorated with clusters of pearls. With signed G. Fouquet box. Shown in the Poster House (New York) exhibition "Alphonse Mucha: Art Nouveau./Nouvelle Femme," June 20-October 6, 2019.

Georges Fouquet French Art Nouveau Opal, Pearl, Gold and Plique-à-Jour Enamel Pendant Necklace

Marsh Mid-20th Century Patinated Steel, Palladium, Pearl and Diamond Ring

An American patinated steel, palladium, mabé pearl and diamond ring, by G.T. Marsh. The ring centers on a 15.4mm Mabé pearl flanked by 6 round brilliant-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of .30 carat, mounted in patinated steel, completed by a palladium shank. G.T. Marsh & Co. was a San Francisco-based Asian art dealer known for their distinctive jewels. As a boy infatuated with Asian culture, George Turner Marsh apprenticed with a Japanese tea merchant, remaining there alone while his Australian family continued on to San Francisco, where they settled. Young George used his time in Yokohama to become conversant in Japanese art and aesthetics, and after re-joining his family, established an Asian art gallery using the expertise he had acquired. During the 1930s, 40s and 50s, his family began designing jewelry based on their interpretation of masterful Japanese metalwork together with the favored gems of the region, jadeite, coral and pearls. The firm''s unique steel jewelry was produced by bluing and sandblasting techniques, which gave the metal its matte finish, an extraordinary base for its sparkling, gleaming gems.

Marsh Mid-20th Century Patinated Steel, Palladium, Pearl and Diamond Ring

"Tale of Genji" Commode by Émile Gallé

A French Art Nouveau marquetry commode by Émile Gallé. With original key. The syncretic influence of Japanese art is keenly felt in Gallé''s commode. The beginning of Galle''s fascination with Japanese art can be traced back to his friendship with Hokkai Takashima (1850-1931), a fellow botanist and member of the École de Nancy. Their botanical dialogue was facilitated by the Shokobutsu mei-i, a book of Japanese names for botanical species. It is from Hokkai that Gallé gained a spiritual and symbolic understanding of nature. Along with other École de Nancy artists, Hokkai and Gallé exhibited together in the display window of René Wiener''s papeterie. The store served as the office of Wiener''s arts journal, the Nancy artiste, which regularly featured on its covers contemporary examples of Gansai (Japanese watercolor), Byobu (folding screens) from the Rinpa school, Sumi-e (ink painting), and Ukiyo-e (woodblock prints). As a show of gratitude, Hokkai bequeathed a vast art book collection to Wiener. It is from this record that we know with certainty of which Japanese artists Gallé had knowledge. One of the books in Hokkai''s collection was Hokusai''s Les cent paysages du Fuji (Fugaku hyakkei.) This 1835 expansion of Hokusai''s 36 views of Mount Fuji contained more elaborate iterations of his original compositions. The commode features two drawers and four cabriole legs. ... The front of the drawers features a marquetry panel with mountains, unkai (sea of clouds) and usugumo (wisps of clouds) motifs. It is likely from works like Hokusai''s Yama mata yama (Mountains Upon Mountains) that Gallé assimilated the unkai (??) motif. The Yama mata yama is the album''s only zenithal view, allowing this phenomenon which is normally only visible from high elevations. On the top of the commode, a sunset mirage overlooks the entire scene. Meanwhile in the foreground, Gallé has included a usugumo motif rendered in warm brown wood. The wisps of cloud motif originates in a stanza in the Tale of Genji in his mourning for Fujitsubo. Those thin wisps of cloud trailing there over Mountains caught in sunset light Seem to wish to match their hue To the sleeves of the bereaved. There is a distinct temporal quality in the commode''s composition. The left side panel depicts a diurne while the right side panel depicts a nocturne. The juxtaposition of day and night in Japanese ukiyo-e was a subject much beloved by Hokusai and Hiroshige and was termed chuya (chu meaning day and ya meaning night). The Japanese nocturne was clearly a subject of great fascination to Gallé as well as evidenced by his "Nuit Japonais" vase. A similar commode is pictured in: "Gallé Furniture", by Alastair Duncan and Georges de Bartha, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 2012, p. 329, plate 15.

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'Tale of Genji' Commode by Émile Gallé

French Art Nouveau Dragonfly Table by Émile Gallé.

A French Art Nouveau two tiered table by Émile Gallé. The table''s four legs are the carved bodies of dragonflies, their wings outstretched and frozen mid-flight. The table top rests on the dragonflies'' heads and wings, with a fluid curvature in the corners creating a crown for the winged creatures'' heads. Marquetry on the table top depicts flowers on long-leafed stems, with shadows of foliage in the background. Decoration in darker tones and larger, starker motifs, decorate the lower tier, playing on the shadows in which it is naturally shrouded. The dragonfly works of Gallé''s provoked very strong critical reaction when they were debuted in 1900, with champions of Art Nouveau lauding the modernity of the dragonfly as caryatid, while detractors were horrified by the very idea of insects as table legs. Time has certainly found favor with this design, as it has found pride of place in museum collections worldwide. A similar table is pictured in: "Gallé Furniture," by Alastair Duncan and Georges de Bartha, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 2012, p. 207, plate 192a.

French Art Nouveau Dragonfly Table by Émile Gallé.

French Art Nouveau Vitrine by Emile Gallé

A French Art Nouveau "le cerisier" (cherry tree) vitrine by Emile Gallé featuring marquetry and carving throughout with original stylized fleur-de-lys brass shelf rests and a key with floral decoration. The mirrored vitrine backing enables one to view the backside of the collection housed within. This unusual piece was originally electrified when manufactured. The beginning of Gallé''s fascination with Japanese art can be traced back to his friendship with Hokkai Takashima (1850-1931), a Japanese nobleman, fellow botanist and member of the École de Nancy. Takashima introduced Gallé to a mesmerizing world of Japanese woodblock prints and textile designs, which he frequently incorporated into his work. Gallé''s early success at the 1900 Paris Exposition Universelle was with his "Japonisante" vitrine, a piece that featured "cherry blossom" openwork. In Gallé''s personal life, the cherry blossom held sentimental value, reminding him of his trips to Saillon, Switzerland. In his journal, Gallé mused "the cherries ripen in the snow falling from the dandelions." The gentle dark wood ripples in the marquetry evoke alpine mist and clouds taking the viewer to this enchanting scene. A similar vitrine is pictured in: "Gallé Furniture," by Alastair Duncan and Georges de Bartha, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 2012, p. 295, plate 17.

French Art Nouveau Vitrine by Emile Gallé

A French Art Nouveau Wooden Pedestal by Emile Gallé

A French Art Nouveau two-tiered square pedestal with carved and marquetry decoration by Emile Gallé. The pedestal has two marquetry shelves depicting leaves. Its four sinuous legs are enhanced with carved arch supports. A similar selette is pictured in: "Gallé Furniture," by Alastair Duncan and Georges de Bartha, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 2012, p. 253, plate 18.

A French Art Nouveau Wooden Pedestal by Emile Gallé