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"Counter Balance" Tiffany Lamp

A Tiffany Studios New York "Counter Balance" glass and bronze table lamp, featuring a green Favrile glass "Damascene" shade on a patinated turtleback counter balance base. A similar shade and base are pictured separately in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988. Shade: p. 87, plate 342; base: p. 87, plate 341.

'Counter Balance' Tiffany Lamp

"Crocus" Tiffany Lamp

A Tiffany Studios New York "Crocus/Tulip" leaded glass and patinated bronze table lamp. A bouquet of deep amber, red, gold and yellow hued crocus blossoms with hints of red in various stages of bloom decorates this shade with a sunset ground. The shade sits atop a four footed "Pineapple" base decorated with green glass cabochons. A similar base and shade are pictured in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988. Shade: p. 137, plate 575; base: p. 64, plate 247.

'Crocus' Tiffany Lamp

Tiffany Studios New York Favrile Glass Vase

A Louis Comfort Tiffany favrile glass "Red Hooked Feather" vase, featuring a rich red color enhanced by an iridescent multicolored pulled feather motif that encircles the vase. Favrile is the trade name Tiffany gave to his blown art glass. The name derives from the Latin word fabrilis, meaning "made by hand." The technique was developed at the Tiffany Glass and Decorating Company in the mid-1890s using filaments from batches of differently colored glass and working the material while the glass was still molten. Ornamentation was added before the piece had its final shape, so that the decoration became fully integrated into the vessel. The technique was used in both decorative vases and functional pieces such as tableware (bowls, goblets, carafes) and lamp shades. Tiffany intended the favrile designation as a guarantee to current customers and future collectors of the fine quality of these objects.

Tiffany Studios New York Favrile Glass Vase

"Nasturtium" Tiffany Floor Lamp

A Tiffany Studios New York "Nasturtium" glass and bronze table lamp. The shade, depicting red, orange and pink blossoms on a variegated translucent green ground, sits atop a Tiffany Studios New York patinated bronze "Junior Onion Decorated" floor lamp base. A similar shade is pictured in: "The Lamps of Tiffany," by Dr. Egon Neustadt, New York: The Fairfield Press, 1970, p. 155, plate 218. A similar base is pictured in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988, p. 206, plate 801.

'Nasturtium' Tiffany Floor Lamp

Tiffany Studios New York Bluish Green Favrile Glass Vase

A bluish green Favrile glass vase by Louis Comfort Tiffany featuring a pulled silver iridescent border. Favrile is the trade name Tiffany gave to his blown art glass. The name derives from the Latin word fabrilis, meaning "made by hand." The technique was developed at the Tiffany Glass and Decorating Company in the mid-1890s using filaments from batches of differently colored glass and working the material while the glass was still molten. Ornamentation was added before the piece had its final shape, so that the decoration became fully integrated into the vessel. The technique was used in both decorative vases and functional pieces such as tableware (bowls, goblets, carafes) and lamp shades. Tiffany intended the favrile designation as a guarantee to current customers and future collectors of the fine quality of these objects.

Tiffany Studios New York Bluish Green Favrile Glass Vase

Tiffany Glass and Bronze "Dragonfly" Chandelier

A Tiffany Studios New York "Dragonfly" glass and bronze chandelier. This elegant chandelier is composed of a choice selection of glass, which makes this an exceptional example of Tiffany''s iconic dragonfly lamp. The dragonflies are composed of dark green glass bodies, variegated blue glass wings and red glass eyes. The cabochon glass jewels that surround this chandelier depict emeralds, sapphires and topaz. The two top and three bottom borders are made up of various colors of rippled glass. This exciting glass composition rests upon a ground of green, green/blue and brown glass. While Tiffany was largely credited for his company''s glass innovations during his lifetime, recent archival research has shed light on the unsung heroes behind his genius. Two such figures were responsible for the astounding effects of this dragonfly lamp: Tiffany had gone through four chemists before he landed on Arthur J Nash, a chemist previously employed at the White House Glass Works in Stourbridge. England. It was Nash''s formulas, developed from before his employment at Tiffany, that became the core of Tiffany''s palette. Nash was no stranger to experimentation, adding unconventional materials such as birch bark and burnt oats to create his amber glass. Clara Driscoll, head of the Tiffany Studios Women''s Glass Cutting Department, designed the dragonfly lamp, earning much acclaim for h ... er artistic prowess in her time. (For more information on her work see "A New Light on Tiffany: Clara Driscoll and the Tiffany Girls," by Martine Eidelberg, Nina Gray, and Margaret K. Hofer, 2007.) Louis Comfort Tiffany''s "Dragonfly" lamps have become so iconic and loved because the artisans who made them were not limited in color as they were when making floral and geometric shades. We can imagine that the dragonflies that adorn the lower edge of the shade are flying low across a verdant field. Similar chandeliers are pictured in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988, p. 230, plate 891-893.

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Tiffany Glass and Bronze 'Dragonfly' Chandelier

"Three-Light Piano Lily" Tiffany Lamp

A Tiffany Studios New York glass and bronze piano table lamp featuring a "Three-Light-Lily" with golden Favrile glass shades suspended above a patinated bronze decorated "Artichoke" base. A similar lamp is pictured in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988, p. 59, plate 212.

'Three-Light Piano Lily' Tiffany Lamp

"Geometric Brick" Tiffany Chandelier

A Tiffany Studios New York "Geometric" leaded glass and bronze chandelier. The green- and sunset-hued mottled glass shade features a geometric "brick" pattern. The shade hangs from a patinated bronze suspension. A similar hanging shade is pictured in: Alastair Duncan, "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models," Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club Ltd., 2007, p. 310, plate 1244.

'Geometric Brick' Tiffany Chandelier