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French Art Nouveau "Mimosa" Vase by Daum

An artistic French Art Nouveau mimosa vase by Daum featuring pink cameo overlay naturalistically modeled as a languid orchid. The influences of Japanese culture permeated fin de siècle Paris and could be felt in museums and in homes. Similarly, a nascent fascination with natural forms, found in publications of the day like Ernst Haeckle''s Kunstformen der Natur, manifested itself in a proliferation of flowers in French art and design and in an intense investigation of flora where artists rivaled botanists. This piece borders on abstraction. The orchid, splayed open and surrounded by copious pollen spores, is imbued with feminine sensuality. The imaginative color palate and curving lines surpass the glass design standards of the day and render this piece a beguiling objet d''art.

French Art Nouveau 'Mimosa' Vase by Daum

Art Nouveau pâte-de-verre tray by Bergé and Walter,

A French Art Nouveau glass pâte-de-verre tray designed by Henri Bergé and executed by Amalric Walter, featuring yellow, orange and green striations. The tray is adorned with an ocean scene featuring a blue/green crab atop seaweed. A similar tray is pictured in "Almaric Walter (1870-1959)" by Keith Cummings, Kingswinford (UK): Broadfield House Glass Museum, 2006, page 73 plate 113.

Art Nouveau pâte-de-verre tray by Bergé and Walter,

Tiffany Wheel Carved Favrile Glass Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York wheel carved Favrile glass vase. The vase is globe shaped and features a band of red nasturtiums and green lily pads against an opalescent glass ground. A vase with similar motif is pictured in: "Louis Comfort Tiffany" by Jacob Baal-Teshuva, New York: Taschen, 2001, p. 287; and in: Alastair Duncan, "Louis C. Tiffany: The Garden Museum Collection", Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 2004, p. 245 (top left).

Tiffany Wheel Carved Favrile Glass Vase

Tiffany Studios New York Glass Vase

An early Tiffany Studios New York favrile glass vase with pulled decoration. The vase features iridescent swirls in pinks and blues on a translucent pale brown background. Favrile is the trade name Tiffany gave to his blown art glass. The name derives from the Latin word fabrilis, meaning "made by hand." The technique was developed at the Tiffany Glass and Decorating Company in the mid-1890s using filaments from batches of differently colored glass and working the material while the glass was still molten. Ornamentation was added before the piece had its final shape, so that the decoration became fully integrated into the vessel. The technique was used in both decorative vases and functional pieces such as tableware (bowls, goblets, carafes) and lamp shades. Tiffany intended the favrile designation as a guarantee to current customers and future collectors of the fine quality of these objects. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: "Louis C. Tiffany: Artist for the Ages" by Marilynn A. Johnson, London: Scala Publishers, Ltd., 2005, p. 228, cat. 130. Also in the collection of the Victorian Albert Museum, documented in "Louis C. Tiffany: The Collected Works of Robert Koch," Atglen, PA: Schiffer, 2001, page 316.

Tiffany Studios New York Glass Vase

Tiffany Studios New York "Nasturtium" Paperweight Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York "Nasturtium" Paperweight vase featuring purple nasturtium blossoms with green leaves set within a golden, translucent ground. Provenance: The Garden Museum Collection, Matsue, Japan. The paperweight technique involved fusing thin rods of transparent glass in a variety of colors. The resulting thicker rod was but into thin pieces and were then worked into clear glass. This vase is pictured in: "Louis C. Tiffany: The Garden Museum Collection," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 2004, p. 260.

Tiffany Studios New York 'Nasturtium' Paperweight Vase

Tiffany Studios New York Glass "Peacock" Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York Favrile glass "Peacock" vase with iridescent pulled decoration stylized to look like peacock feathers by Louis Comfort Tiffany. The peacock feather was a favorite motif of Louis Comfort Tiffany. Shown in Strut: The Peacock and Beauty in Art at the Hudson River Museum, October 11, 2014 to January 18, 2015. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: "Tiffany Favrile Glass and the Quest of Beauty," by Martin Eidelberg, New York: Lillian Nassau LLC, 2007, p. 46.

Tiffany Studios New York Glass 'Peacock' Vase

Art Nouveau "Crabe" vide-poche by Amalric Walter

A French "Crabe" pâte de verre vide-poche by Amalric Walter. The reddish-brown crab has spots of dark green, red and yellow on the top portion of its shell. It sits on a green wave with long strands of seaweed. A similar vide-poche is pictured in: Amalric Walter (1870-1959), by Keith Cummings, Kingswinford: Broadfield House Glass Museum, 2006, p. 18, cat. no. 15.

Art Nouveau 'Crabe' vide-poche by Amalric Walter

French "Crabe" Pâte de Verre Vide Poche by Amalric Walter and Henri Bergé

A French "Crab" pâte de verre vide-poche by Amalric Walter and Henri Bergé. The reddish-brown crab, with spots of deep yellow and deep green on its back, sits atop a bed of kelp on an elongated green and yellow dish. A similar vide-poche is pictured in: Amalric Walter (1870-1959), by Keith Cummings, Kingswinford: Broadfield House Glass Museum, 2006, p. 25, cat. no .30.

French 'Crabe' Pâte de Verre Vide Poche by Amalric Walter and Henri Bergé