<< PREV Page 2 of 3 NEXT >>         View All
Search Results for

"Paul"

Related Articles

Tiffany Studios New York American "Lava" Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York American Art Nouveau "Lava" vase A visit to Mount Etna in Sicily during one of its eruptions is said to have inspired Tiffany to capture in glass the force and beauty of the molten volcanic flows and basaltic rock formations that he observed there. The free-form abstract drippings of gold molten glass and the speckled blue and gold ground recreate the naturalistic effects of flowing lava and make this vase an exceptional example of the form. Provenance: The Garden Museum Collection, Matsue, Japan and Important Art Nouveau from the Private Collection of Lloyd & Barbara Macklowe at Sotheby''s 1995 This vase is pictured in: "A Selection of 300 Works From Louis C. Tiffany Garden Museum," by Takeo Horiuchi, Japan: Greco Corporation Fine Art Department, 2001, p. 250. A similar piece is also in the collection of the Chrysler Museum in Norfolk, VA: "The Tiffany Collection of the Chrysler Museum at Norfolk," by Paul E. Doros, Richmond, VA: W. M. Brown & son, Inc., 1978, p. 70, plate 69. Also pictured in "Tiffany Favrile Glass and the Quest of Beauty," by Martin Eidelberg, page 29, plate 28.

Tiffany Studios New York American 'Lava' Vase

Tiffany Morning Glory Paperweight Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York "Paperweight" vase by Louis Comfort Tiffany. A major innovation in Tiffany''s work around 1900 involved the encasement of hot glass with an additional transparent layer--a technique associated with paperweights. The added layer of clear glass produced a three-dimensional effect, as though the plants existed in a lower level, beneath the surface. Most of Tiffany''s early "Paperweight" vases had a clear body with a gold iridescent core, adding to the poetic effect. This particular vase displays purple and white cream morning glories with green veined leaves and stems against an iridescent translucent light green hued ground. The difficulty of creating naturalistic imagery in hot glass should not be underestimated. The detailed representation of the morning glory blossoms with their star-like markings makes this vase highly desirable. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: "Louis C. Tiffany: Artist for the Ages," by Marilynn A. Johnson, London: Scala Publishers, Ltd., 2005, p. 150, ca. not. 56; "The Art Glass of Louis Comfort Tiffany", by Paul E. Doros, New York: The Vendome Press, 2013, p. 140, fig. 89; and in: "Louis Comfort Tiffany at Tiffany & Co.," by John Loring, New York: Harry N. Abrams, Inc., 2002, page 163.

Tiffany Morning Glory Paperweight Vase

Gauthier & Poinsignon French Settee

A French settee by Camille Gauthier & Paul Poinsignon. The settee in mahogany has carved stylized flowers on the back, arms and below the seat. Upholstered in green fabric.

Gauthier & Poinsignon French Settee

Pair of French Gauthier & Poinsignon Side Chairs

A pair of French side chairs in mahogany by Camille Gauthier & Paul Poinsignon. The chairs have carved stylized flowers on their backs, arms and below the seats. They are upholstered in green fabric.

Pair of French Gauthier & Poinsignon Side Chairs

Tiffany Studios New York Enamel Box

A Tiffany Studios New York "Olive" covered box by, executed by the Enamelware Department of Stonebridge Glass Company, New York. This fabulous masterpiece is composed of enameled copper. The cover is decorated with olives, purple-brown copper branches and deep green leaves. From Paul Doros: "This enameled covered box clearly reveals the quality and innovative artistry that led to the company winning a gold medal at that world''s fair. It is of a familiar form but features an unusual motif and palette. Both the cover and slightly ribbed body have a repoussé design of ripening olives and pendant leaves on sinuous branches, one of them forming an irregular sculptural handle. The gold background is particularly noteworthy. Most Tiffany enamels of this type have a ground in shades of either red or blue. The background used in this object is perfectly suited, as it suggests olives ripening under a warm, golden sun. Hints of gold glimmer and sparkle through the slightly iridescent aubergine and purple olives, as well as the green leaves, adding to the illusion. It was pieces such as this one that caused contemporary critics to proclaim Tiffany''s enamels as "rare works of art" as well as "visions of delight." Paul Doros is former curator of glass at the Chrysler Museum of Art (Norfolk, Virginia) and author of The Art Glass of Louis Comfort Tiffany (New York: Vendome Press) ... , 2013. PROVENANCE Parke-Bernet Galleries Inc., New York Private Collection, New York, circa 1965 Thence by descent to the present owners LITERATURE Martin Eidelberg and Nancy McClelland, "Behind the Scenes of Tiffany Glassmaking: The Nash Notebooks," New York, 2001, pp. 21 and 178 (for the model executed in pottery) Alastair Duncan, "Louis C. Tiffany: The Garden Museum Collection," Woodbridge, Suffolk, 2004, pp. 466 (for the model executed in pottery) and 471 (for the model executed in bronze pottery)

< View More >
Tiffany Studios New York Enamel Box

Tiffany Studios "Cypriote" Miniature Vase

An early and unusual Tiffany Favrile glass Cypriote vase. The rounded body of the vase is decorated near the tapered neck and near the foot with an iridescent swirling motif in richly saturated tones of gold and ochre, framing a series of central pointed oval "window" panels of textured "Cypriote" glass, resting on a small circular foot, signed on the underside. Cypriote is a textured glass achieved at Tiffany Glass and Decorating Company by rolling glass over a marble or iron surface covered with pulverized bits of the same glass. Its iridescence and bubbles resembled the decomposed surface of Roman glass discovered during archeological explorations on the island of Cyprus, hence its name. Lava glass evolved from Cypriote glass by using thicker, brighter glass and dripping golden glass irregularly over the surface. Tiffany created a unique numbering system for his artistic glass. Beginning in 1892, glassware was progressively signed 1-9999. The next series deployed an "A" as a prefix, making it easy to date this "E" prefix vase to 1896. Vases with prefixes of J, N and V have dates confirmed by international exhibitions, as do vases with suffixes of J and M. Vases from 1928, the last year of production were signed with a suffix "W". It appears that starting in 1906 each new year ushered in a new letter. While the diligence of the Tiffany Studios records cannot be veri ... fied due to a catastrophic fire that closed the factory in 1928, if one follows the logic of the numbering system it is possible that as many as 490,000 artistic vases were produced at the Tiffany Studios New York from 1892-1928. A similar vase is pictured in:" The Tiffany Collection of the Chrysler Museum at Norfolk," by Paul E. Doros, Richmond, VA: W. M. Brown & son, Inc., 1978, p. 59, cat. no. 57; and in: "Timeless Beauty: The Art of Louis Comfort Tiffany," Atglen, PA: Schiffer Publishing, 2016, p. 79.

< View More >
Tiffany Studios 'Cypriote' Miniature Vase

Gauthier Dining Suite

A French Art Nouveau dining suite featuring a dining table with two custom leaves, a set of six mahogany dining chairs with tooled leather and brass tacks and a sideboard featuring a mirror, bronze accents and a marble top by Camille Gauthier & Paul Poinsignon. The sideboard is carved with berries and leaves. It has bronze inlays and a bronze drawer-pull in a sinuous leaf and twisted vine motif. The berries and leaves are also carved into the legs and base of the table. Each tooled leather chair back is affixed with bronze studs and decorated with a different floral image. Dimensions: Dining Table: 29-1/2'''' high x 45'''' wide x 50-1/2'''' long, extends with three leaves to 122-1/2". Dining Chairs: 38¾'''' high x 17'''' wide x 17'''' deep. Sideboard: : 62¾'''' high x 51'''' wide x 21'''' deep.

Gauthier Dining Suite

Tiffany Studios New York "Tel el Amarna" Vase

A rare and monumental Tiffany Studios New York "Tel el Amarna" Favrile glass vase with an iridescent cobalt blue body and a brilliant turquoise blue foot and rim. Vases with zigzag decoration such as this have been commonly called "Tel el Amarna," after the decorative motifs of ancient Egypt. However, recent research has shown that Tiffany actually intended these vases to be referred to as "Byzantine," with the exception of vases featuring the brilliant blue color associated with the blue faience of the Eighteenth Dynasty of Amarna, Egypt, circa 1346 BC. This is the largest and most brilliantly colored vase of this genre that Macklowe Gallery has had the privilege of owning in our 50 years specializing in the artistic glass of Louis Comfort Tiffany. Similary decorated vases are pictured in: "The Art of Louis Comfort Tiffany", by Tessa Paul, New York: Exeter Books, 1987, p. 75.

Tiffany Studios New York 'Tel el Amarna' Vase