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Glass "Paperweight" Tiffany Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York Art Nouveau ''paperweight'' glass vase. White blossoms with pink millefiori florets sprinkled throughout a green pulled-leaf motif, all featured on a clear background. The paperweight technique involved fusing thin rods of transparent glass in a variety of colors. The resulting thicker rod was cut into thin pieces and were then worked into clear glass. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: "Louis Comfort Tiffany at Tiffany & Co.," by John Loring, New York: Harry N. Abrams, Inc., 2002, p. 158.

Glass 'Paperweight' Tiffany Vase

Tiffany Favrile Paperweight "Daffodil" Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York Favrile paperweight glass "Daffodil" vase, featuring yellow flowers with dark centers extending above green leaves. The paperweight technique involved fusing thin rods of transparent glass in a variety of colors. The resulting thicker rod was but into thin pieces and were then worked into clear glass. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: "Louis Comfort Tiffany at Tiffany & Co.," by John Loring, New York: Harry N. Abrams, Inc., 2002, page 158.

Tiffany Favrile Paperweight 'Daffodil' Vase

Tiffany Studios New York "Paperweight" Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York "Paperweight" glass vase, featuring yellow daffodils with red centers supported by green stems. The paperweight technique involved fusing thin rods of transparent glass in a variety of colors. The resulting thicker rod was cut into thin pieces that were then worked into clear glass. A similar vase is pictured in: "Louis Comfort Tiffany at Tiffany & Co." by John Loring, New York: Harry N. Abrams, Inc., 2002, page 158.

Tiffany Studios New York  'Paperweight' Vase

Favrile "Paperweight" Tiffany Glass Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York favrile "paperweight" glass vase decorated with a band of white daisies with long green stems and enhanced with red accents. The paperweight technique involved fusing thin rods of transparent glass in a variety of colors. The resulting thicker rod was cut into thin pieces and were then worked into clear glass. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: "Louis C. Tiffany: The Collected Works of Robert Koch," Atglen, PA: Schiffer Publishing Ltd., 2001, p. 106.

Favrile 'Paperweight' Tiffany Glass Vase

Glass "Paperweight" Tiffany Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York favrile glass "paperweight" vase, depicting a band of white daisies with green leaves. The paperweight technique involved fusing thin rods of transparent glass in a variety of colors. The resulting thicker rod was cut into thin pieces and were then worked into clear glass. A similar vase is pictured in: "Louis Comfort Tiffany at Tiffany & Co.," by John Loring, New York: Harry N. Abrams, Inc., 2002, page 158.

Glass 'Paperweight' Tiffany Vase

Tiffany Studios New York "Nasturtium" Paperweight Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York "Nasturtium" Paperweight vase featuring purple nasturtium blossoms with green leaves set within a golden, translucent ground. Provenance: The Garden Museum Collection, Matsue, Japan. The paperweight technique involved fusing thin rods of transparent glass in a variety of colors. The resulting thicker rod was but into thin pieces and were then worked into clear glass. This vase is pictured in: "Louis C. Tiffany: The Garden Museum Collection," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 2004, p. 260.

Tiffany Studios New York 'Nasturtium' Paperweight Vase

Tiffany Studios New York Favrile Paperweight Vase

A Favrile "paperweight" vase by Tiffany Studios New York. The earliest examples of "paperweight" objects appeared around 1900, Louis Comfort Tiffany loved this technique of encasing a design within a dome of transparent glass because it was a great vehicle for expressing his love of nature, particularly flowers. This vase is internally decorated with gladiolus flowers with yellow, green and purple threads. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: "The Art Glass of Louis Comfort Tiffany," by Paul E. Doros, New York: The Vendome Press, 2013, p. 136, fig.82. Also pictured in "Louis Comfort Tiffany," by Jacob Baal-Teshuva, New York: Taschen, 2001, page 291.

Tiffany Studios New York Favrile Paperweight Vase

Tiffany Morning Glory Paperweight Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York "Paperweight" vase by Louis Comfort Tiffany. A major innovation in Tiffany''s work around 1900 involved the encasement of hot glass with an additional transparent layer--a technique associated with paperweights. The added layer of clear glass produced a three-dimensional effect, as though the plants existed in a lower level, beneath the surface. Most of Tiffany''s early "Paperweight" vases had a clear body with a gold iridescent core, adding to the poetic effect. This particular vase displays purple and white cream morning glories with green veined leaves and stems against an iridescent translucent light green hued ground. The difficulty of creating naturalistic imagery in hot glass should not be underestimated. The detailed representation of the morning glory blossoms with their star-like markings makes this vase highly desirable. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: "Louis C. Tiffany: Artist for the Ages," by Marilynn A. Johnson, London: Scala Publishers, Ltd., 2005, p. 150, ca. not. 56; "The Art Glass of Louis Comfort Tiffany", by Paul E. Doros, New York: The Vendome Press, 2013, p. 140, fig. 89; and in: "Louis Comfort Tiffany at Tiffany & Co.," by John Loring, New York: Harry N. Abrams, Inc., 2002, page 163.

Tiffany Morning Glory Paperweight Vase

Tiffany Studios New York "Reactive Paperweight" Vase

An extremely rare and collectible Tiffany Studios New York "Leaf and Vine" Reactive Paperweight glass vase.The "leaf and vine" design was based upon the leaves of the bindweed vine. While closely related to the Tiffany''s beloved morning glory paperweights, Tiffany chose not to let the flowers of the bindweed distract from the intricate venation of the leaves. Employing the considerable technical acumen of his chemist Parker McIlhiney and the extraordinary technical skills of his main gaffer (or glass decorator), Leslie Nash, Tiffany experimented with every glass technique imaginable. In this vase, heat-sensitive ("reactive") glass was built up from a purple interior to an orange and green decorative motif of autumnal leaves and vines, finally encased in a transparent clear layer of glass, hence the "Paperweight" title. The remarkable thing about this vase is how the glass changes color in transmitted versus reflected light. Tiffany produced very few of these vases, none with such a brilliant color as in the present example, and all are distinguished by an "X" in the signature to reflect their "Experimental" nature.

Tiffany Studios New York 'Reactive Paperweight' Vase

Tiffany Studios New York "Leaf and Vine" Glass Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York carved cameo "Leaf and Vine" paperweight vase. The "leaf and vine" design was based upon the leaves of the bindweed vine. While closely related to the Tiffany''s beloved morning glory paperweights, Tiffany chose not to let the flowers of the bindweed distract from the intricate venation of the bindweed leaves. The leaf and vine decoration was achieved with intarsia, or applying small purple glass forms while the bubble remained on the gaffer''s blowpipe. A major innovation in Tiffany''s work around 1900 involved the encasement of hot glass with an additional transparent layer, a technique associated with paperweights. The added layer of clear glass produced a three-dimensional effect, as though the plants existed in a lower level, beneath the surface. Most of Tiffany''s early "Paperweight" vases had a clear body with a gold iridescent core, adding to the poetic effect. This particular vase displays purple heart-shaped leaves with swirling vines against an iridescent translucent gold ground. The vines were then cameo cut in deep relief, giving the vase a spectacular three-dimensional effect. The difficulty of creating naturalistic imagery in hot glass should not be underestimated. The detailed representation of the leaves and stems makes this vase highly desirable. A similar vase is pictured in: Alastair Duncan, "Louis C. Tiffany: The Garden Museum Collection," Woodbridge, Suffolk, 2004, p. 245

Tiffany Studios New York 'Leaf and Vine'  Glass Vase