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Art Nouveau pâte de verre "Masques" Vase by Gabriel Argy-Rousseau

A French Art Nouveau pâte de verre "Masques" vase by Gabriel Argy-Rousseau. The vase is decorated with two red masks that are framed in purple and green leaves. Provenance: Christie''s, New York, Important 20th Century Decorative Arts Including Works by Tiffany Studios, 13 June 2002, lot 39. A similar vase is pictured in J. Bloch-Dermont, Les Pâtes de Verre G. Argy-Rousseau Catalogue Raisonné, Paris, 1990, p. 178, no. 14.06.

Art Nouveau pâte de verre 'Masques' Vase by Gabriel Argy-Rousseau

French Art Nouveau Side Table by Edouard Colonna

A French Art Nouveau mahogany side table with carved decoration in an abstract curvilinear vegetal motif by Edouard Colonna (1862-1948). Along with Louis Comfort Tiffany, Edouard Colonna was one of the main designers who worked for Siegfried Bing and who, under Bing''s guidance, was responsible for the creation of what is known today as the Modern Style, or Art Nouveau. Colonna is remembered for his tasteful elegance and his use of abstract forms to create a graceful linear rhythm and dynamic intertwining lines. While he occasionally started with a floral motif, Colonna abstracted nature to create the impression of a flower bud or bloom held within a carefully constructed geometric scheme. This design scheme is evident in the delicate carvings ornamenting each leg of the table and in the overall rhythm of the piece. Colonna furniture, jewelry and designs for small objects like scarf and money holders would become the backbone of Bing''s business. By 1898 a number of his works were on display at Bing''s L''Art Nouveau. A similar table is pictured in: "The Paris Salons 1895-1915, Vol. III: Furniture," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1996, p. 109.

French Art Nouveau Side Table by Edouard Colonna

French Art Nouveau Table by Majorelle

A French Art Nouveau mahogany salon table with fruitwood marquetry by Louis Majorelle. The table top is decorated with leaves and vines. The legs have carved flowers. Provenance Property from the Geyer Collection Louis C. Tiffany Garden Museum Collection, Matsue, Japan Sotheby''s Paris, Chefs-d''Ouevre Art Nouveau, Ancienne Collection du Garden Museum, Japon, February 16, 2013, lot 57 Acquired from the above by the present owner Literature Alastair Duncan, "Louis C. Tiffany: The Garden Museum Collection," Woodbridge, Suffolk, 2004, p. 619 (for related examples from the Garden Museum Collection)

French Art Nouveau Table by Majorelle

Antique Tiffany & Co. Diamond and Gold Cuff Links

A pair of Antique 18 karat gold cuff links with diamonds by Tiffany & Co. The heavy, lozenge-shaped cuff links have 4 old European-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of 1.50 carat, H-I color, VS clarity. Double-sided. With later, signed, Tiffany & Co. box.

Antique Tiffany & Co. Diamond and Gold Cuff Links

Marcus & Co. Art Nouveau Opal and Gold Stick Pin

An American Art Nouveau 18 karat gold stick pin with enameling and black opal by Marcus & Co. The stick pin has a cabochon opal surrounded with four enamel side sections decorated with gold relief arabesque designs. The multi-generational New York firm of Marcus & Co was founded by an ambitious young German immigrant who had trained at a prominent Dresden court jeweler. In 1892, after working with Charles Lewis Tiffany, Hermann Marcus and his sons William and George together set up a business that soon became a glittering New York society institution renowned not only for its superb diamonds, colored stones and pearls, but also its instantly recognizable, original design style. The firm produced great jewels in the Art Nouveau and Arts & Crafts sensibility, with George, the artist/designer, drawing inspiration from sources as diverse and exotic as the contemporary French masters, the Moghuls and Maharajahs, the garland style of the Ancien Regime, and the genius of Renaissance goldsmiths. George''s distinctive, confident hand was always discernible in Marcus creations. Working as a team with George, his brother William was a gem and pearl connoisseur who travelled the world hunting fine gem material, including purchasing the entire production of never-before-seen black opal in Lightning Ridge Australia in 1908. Marcus exhibited at the 1900 Exposition Universelle in Paris, and ... their work won prizes at the prestigious Society of Arts & Crafts of Boston. The firm and family were well-known for their charitable activities and promotion of young jewelers such as Raymond Yard.

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Marcus & Co. Art Nouveau Opal and Gold Stick Pin

Marcus & Company Art Nouveau Peridot, Diamond, Gold and Enamel Ring

An American Art Nouveau gold, peridot, diamond and enamel ring by Marcus & Co. The unique Renaissance Revival motif features green enameled 18-karat gold, two round-cut peridots totaling approximately 1.60 carats, and 30 round-cut diamonds that weigh approximately 1.20 carats. The Renaissance Revival design influence is carried onto the ring shank, culminating in a diamond set into the ring shank bottom. This striking ring demonstrates the color sensitivity of the famed American firm, Marcus & Co. It is also a rare and interesting Art Nouveau example of a Toi et Moi ring, or a ring in which two stones or two types of stones dynamically cross over each other symbolically representing a romantic union. The Toi et Moi rings were popularized by no less than Napoleon Bonaparte when he scandalously proposed to his soon to be Empress, Josephine. The multi-generational New York firm of Marcus & Co was founded by an ambitious young German immigrant who had trained at a prominent Dresden court jeweler. In 1892, after working with Charles Lewis Tiffany, Hermann Marcus and his sons William and George together set up a business that soon became a glittering New York society institution renowned not only for its superb diamonds, colored stones and pearls, but also its instantly recognizable, original design style. The firm produced great jewels in the Art Nouveau and Arts & Crafts s ... ensibility, with George, the artist/designer, drawing inspiration from sources as diverse and exotic as the contemporary French masters, the Moghuls and Maharajahs, the garland style of the Ancien Regime, and the genius of Renaissance goldsmiths. George''s distinctive, confident hand was always discernible in Marcus creations. Working as a team with George, his brother William was a gem and pearl connoisseur who travelled the world hunting fine gem material, including purchasing the entire production of never-before-seen black opal in Lightning Ridge Australia in 1908. Marcus exhibited at the 1900 Exposition Universelle in Paris, and their work won prizes at the prestigious Society of Arts & Crafts of Boston. The firm and family were well-known for their charitable activities and promotion of young jewelers such as Raymond Yard.

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Marcus & Company Art Nouveau Peridot,  Diamond, Gold and Enamel Ring

Tiffany & Co. Art Nouveau Gold Cuff Links

A pair of American Art Nouveau 18 karat gold cuff links by Tiffany & Co. The double sided cuff links are made in a curved rectangular shape with a dimensional concentric motif.

Tiffany & Co. Art Nouveau Gold Cuff Links

Marcus & Co. Art Nouveau Pearl, Diamond and Emerald Brooch

An Art Nouveau brooch with pearls, diamonds and emerald by Marcus & Co. The brooch has 10 semi-spherical pearls, 15 Old European-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of 1.25 carats and a polished emerald drop. Gemological Institute of America certificate #2171449596 states the pearls are natural saltwater button pearls. The multi-generational New York firm of Marcus & Co was founded by an ambitious young German immigrant who had trained at a prominent Dresden court jeweler. In 1892, after working with Charles Lewis Tiffany, Hermann Marcus and his sons William and George together set up a business that soon became a glittering New York society institution renowned not only for its superb diamonds, colored stones and pearls, but also its instantly recognizable, original design style. The firm produced great jewels in the Art Nouveau and Arts & Crafts sensibility, with George, the artist/designer, drawing inspiration from sources as diverse and exotic as the contemporary French masters, the Moghuls and Maharajahs, the garland style of the Ancien Regime, and the genius of Renaissance goldsmiths. George''s distinctive, confident hand was always discernible in Marcus creations. Working as a team with George, his brother William was a gem and pearl connoisseur who travelled the world hunting fine gem material, including purchasing the entire production of never-before-se ... en black opal in Lightning Ridge Australia in 1908. Marcus exhibited at the 1900 Exposition Universelle in Paris, and their work won prizes at the prestigious Society of Arts & Crafts of Boston. Plique-a-jour enamel was an art in which Marcus & Co. excelled, creating jewels with unprecedented three-dimensional depth in this medium. The firm and family were well-known for their charitable activities and promotion of young jewelers such as Raymond Yard.

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Marcus & Co. Art Nouveau Pearl, Diamond and Emerald Brooch

Marcus & Co. Art Nouveau White Opal and Chrysoprase, Plique-à-Jour Enamel and Gold Pendant Brooch

An American Art Nouveau 18 karat gold and enamel pendant brooch with opals and chrysoprase by Marcus & Co.. The pendant brooch has 6 cabochon white opals, 63 cabochon chrysoprase stones and plique-à-jour enamel. Suspended from the brooch is an opal and chrysoprase pendant drop. Detachable brooch finding and flip-down bail. The multi-generational New York firm of Marcus & Co was founded by an ambitious young German immigrant who had trained at a prominent Dresden court jeweler. In 1892, after working with Charles Lewis Tiffany, Hermann Marcus and his sons William and George together set up a business that soon became a glittering New York society institution renowned not only for its superb diamonds, colored stones and pearls, but also its instantly recognizable, original design style. The firm produced great jewels in the Art Nouveau and Arts & Crafts sensibility, with George, the artist/designer, drawing inspiration from sources as diverse and exotic as the contemporary French masters, the Moghuls and Maharajahs, the garland style of the Ancien Regime, and the genius of Renaissance goldsmiths. George''s distinctive, confident hand was always discernible in Marcus creations. Working as a team with George, his brother William was a gem and pearl connoisseur who travelled the world hunting fine gem material, including purchasing the entire production of never-before-seen black ... opal in Lightning Ridge Australia in 1908. Marcus exhibited at the 1900 Exposition Universelle in Paris, and their work won prizes at the prestigious Society of Arts & Crafts of Boston. Plique-a-jour enamel was an art in which Marcus & Co. excelled, creating jewels with unprecedented three-dimensional depth in this medium. The firm and family were well-known for their charitable activities and promotion of young jewelers such as Raymond Yard. Shown in the Poster House (New York) exhibition "Alphonse Mucha: Art Nouveau./Nouvelle Femme," June 20-October 6, 2019.

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Marcus & Co. Art Nouveau White Opal and Chrysoprase, Plique-à-Jour Enamel and Gold Pendant Brooch

Tiffany & Co. Art Deco Diamond, Ruby, Emerald and Platinum Watch/Brooch

An American Art Deco platinum and enamel watch/brooch with diamonds, rubies and emeralds by Tiffany & Co. The watch/brooch has 215 round-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of 4.65 carats, and 14 baguette diamonds with an approximate total weight of 1.00 carat, 20 square-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of .90 carat, 6 cabochon rubies and 1 carved bead ruby with an approximate total weight of .52 carat and 11 cabochon and calibre-cut emeralds with an approximate total weight of .33 carat. "The style for decorative arts of the 1920''s was streamlined; form was reduced to basic geometry and the color palette was made strong and bold as opposed to the delicate pastels that were fashionable in the decades before the war. This trend became solidly established at the 1925 Paris Exposition des Arts Décoratifs, Industriels et Modernes, where visitors were electrified by the explosion of contrasting primary colors, geometric pattern and stylized natural subjects that burst on the scene," Falino and Markowitz. Similar pictured and discussed in American Luxury Jewels from the House of Tiffany, by Falino and Markowitz, editors, Antique Collectors'' Club, 2009, page 144, Plate 91. Exhibited at "Anything Goes: The Jazz Age" at the Nassau County Museum of Art, 24 March 2018 - 8 July 2018.

Tiffany & Co. Art Deco Diamond, Ruby, Emerald and Platinum Watch/Brooch

Tiffany & Co. Art Deco ''No Heat'' Ruby, Diamond and Platinum Ring

An Art Deco platinum ring with rubies and diamonds by Tiffany & Co. The ring centers on an emerald-cut ruby with an approximate weight of 1.10 carats, and 6 old European-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of .70 carat. The ring is designed in a highly graphic Art Deco motif. AGL report no. CS 72168, origin: Burma (Myanmar) origin, no indications of heat.

Tiffany & Co. Art Deco ''No Heat'' Ruby, Diamond and Platinum Ring

Tiffany & Co. Mid-20th Century Ruby, Diamond and Gold Brooch

A Mid-20th Century 18 karat gold brooch with rubies and diamonds by Boucher for Tiffany & Co. The brooch has 27 round-cut rubies with an approximate total weight of 1.45 carats, and 9 round-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of .85 carats. The brooch is designed in a modified shell form.

Tiffany & Co. Mid-20th Century Ruby, Diamond and Gold Brooch

Tiffany & Co. Art Deco Sapphire and Platinum Dress Set

A Tiffany & Co. platinum Art Deco 5-piece cuff link set with sapphires weighing approximately 2.05 carats. The dress set is designed with diagonal stripes of square-cut sapphires bisecting the square cuff link tops. The cuff links are double-sided with bar connections.

Tiffany & Co. Art Deco Sapphire and Platinum Dress Set

Carvin French for Tiffany & Co. Estate Diamond Gold and Wood Bombé Ring

An American Estate 18 karat gold and wood ring with diamonds by Carvin French for Tiffany & Co. The bombé modernist ring has 9 diamonds with an approximate total weight of .25 carat set into an oval, and a swirl detail of inlayed gold. The ring has a gold interior lining ring.

Carvin French for Tiffany & Co. Estate Diamond Gold and Wood Bombé Ring

Platinum Ring with Diamonds by Tiffany & Co.

A platinum ring with diamonds by Tiffany & Co. This band has 32 Asscher cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of 3.20 carats. They have a G/H color and VS clarity grade.

Platinum Ring with Diamonds by Tiffany & Co.

Marcus & Co. Early-20th Century Diamond, Natural Pearl, Platinum and Gold Ring

An American Early 20th Century platinum and 18 karat gold ring with diamonds and natural pearl by Marcus & Co. The ring has 3 old mine-cut diamonds with an approximate weight of 1.25, 1.35 and 1.05 carats, L/M color, SI clarity respectively, and 10 old European-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of .10 carat. The center of this ring is a natural pearl measuring 7.91 x 7.86 mm. Gemological Institute of America Certificate stating natural saltwater pearl #2155277139. The multi-generational New York firm of Marcus & Co was founded by an ambitious young German immigrant who had trained at a prominent Dresden court jeweler. In 1892, after working with Charles Lewis Tiffany, Hermann Marcus and his sons William and George together set up a business that soon became a glittering New York society institution renowned not only for its superb diamonds, colored stones and pearls, but also its instantly recognizable, original design style. The firm produced great jewels in the Art Nouveau and Arts & Crafts sensibility, with George, the artist/designer, drawing inspiration from sources as diverse and exotic as the contemporary French masters, the Moghuls and Maharajahs, the garland style of the Ancien Regime, and the genius of Renaissance goldsmiths. George''s distinctive, confident hand was always discernible in Marcus creations. Working as a team with George, his brother Wil ... liam was a gem and pearl connoisseur who travelled the world hunting fine gem material, including purchasing the entire production of never-before-seen black opal in Lightning Ridge Australia in 1908. Marcus exhibited at the 1900 Exposition Universelle in Paris, and their work won prizes at the prestigious Society of Arts & Crafts of Boston. Plique-a-jour enamel was an art in which Marcus & Co. excelled, creating jewels with unprecedented three-dimensional depth in this medium. The firm and family were well-known for their charitable activities and promotion of young jewelers such as Raymond Yard.

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Marcus & Co. Early-20th Century Diamond, Natural Pearl, Platinum and Gold Ring

Tiffany & Co. Earrings with Aquamarine and Diamond

A pair of earrings with aquamarines and diamonds by Tiffany & Co. The earrings have 6 pear-shaped aquamarines with an approximate total weight of 10.00 carats, and 82 round and rose-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of 4.00 carats with an F-G color and VVS-VS clarity grade.

Tiffany & Co. Earrings with Aquamarine and Diamond

Gold Bracelet by Paloma Picasso for Tiffany & Co.

A French Late-20th Century 18 karat gold X-link bracelet by Paloma Picasso for Tiffany & Co. The bracelet is a beautiful example of the long-celebrated designer''s hallmark simplistic elegance, featuring Tiffany''s famed "X" design.

Gold Bracelet by Paloma Picasso for Tiffany & Co.

Tiffany & Co. Mid-20th Century Ruby, Diamond, Platinum and Gold Bracelet

An American Mid-20th Century 18 karat gold and platinum bracelet with rubies and diamonds by Tiffany & Co. The flexible bracelet has 32 rubies with an approximate total weight of 8.30 carats, and 286 diamonds with an approximate total weight of 12.70 carats. The rubies are thought to be of Burmese origin with no heat treatment.

Tiffany & Co. Mid-20th Century Ruby, Diamond, Platinum and Gold Bracelet

Tiffany & Co. Mid-20th Century Gold Cuff Links

A pair of American Mid-20th Century 14 karat gold cuff links by Tiffany & Co. The cuff links are designed in a rectangular, dimensional ridged motif. Double sided.

Tiffany & Co. Mid-20th Century Gold Cuff Links

Schlumberger for Tiffany & Co. French Mid-20th Century Lapis Lazuli and Turquoise Cuff Links

A pair of French Mid-20th Century 18 karat gold cuff links with lapis lazuli and turquoise by Jean Schlumberger for Tiffany & Co. The cuff links have a total of 22 cabochon turquoise stones set into the 4 lapis lazuli balls. Made in the Schlumberger Paris workroom. Similar pictured in The Jewels of Jean Schlumberger, by Chantal Bizot, Marie-Noel de Gary, Evelyne Posseme, Preface by Helene David-Weil, Harry N. Abrama, Inc. Publishers, 1995, page 64.

Schlumberger for Tiffany & Co. French Mid-20th Century Lapis Lazuli and Turquoise Cuff Links

Gold and Platinum Brooch with Diamonds by Tiffany & Co.

A Mid-20th Century 18 karat gold and platinum brooch with diamonds by Tiffany & Co. The flower brooch has six unique, blooming petals studded with diamonds and framed with textured gold. The piece has 73 round-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of 5.00 carats with a F/G color and VS clarity grade.

Gold and Platinum Brooch with Diamonds by Tiffany & Co.

Gold Necklace with Tiger''s Eye by Tiffany & Co.

An 18 karat gold necklace with tiger''s eye by Tiffany & Co. The necklace is composed of 11 rectangular-cut tiger''s eye links edged in gold, joined by stylized figure-eight links.

Gold Necklace with Tiger''s Eye by Tiffany & Co.

"Sombrero" Brooch by Schlumberger

A Mid-20th Century 18 karat gold and platinum "Sombrero" brooch with diamonds and sapphires by Schlumberger for Tiffany and Co. The brooch has round brilliant-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of 2.95 carats, and round- and oval-cut sapphires with an approximate total weight of 12.00 carats. Made in France, with French assay and maker''s marks

'Sombrero' Brooch by Schlumberger

American Gold Brooch with Enamel, Diamonds and Coral, attributed to Donald Claflin for Tiffany & Co.

An American mid-20th Century 18 karat yellow gold brooch with enamel, diamonds and coral, attributed to Donald Claflin for Tiffany & Co. The brooch has a cabochon coral face with black enamel eyes, turquoise enamel dress, and 16 round brilliant-cut diamonds, with total approximate weight of 0.55 carats, sprinkled through the figure''s hair. The brooch measures approximately 2.75" in length and 1" in width.

American Gold Brooch with Enamel, Diamonds and Coral, attributed to Donald Claflin for Tiffany & Co.

George Verger French Retro Diamond, Ruby, Rose Quartz, Platinum and Gold Bracelet Cuff

An important French Retro, 18-karat rose gold bangle bracelet with diamonds, rubies, and rose quartz, by Verger Frères. The hinged bangle bracelet is designed with terminals of rose quartz sphere clusters, each set with circular-cut rubies, approximate total weight 1.65 carats, flanked by old mine-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of 1.30 carats, further highlighted by calibré-cut rubies with an approximate total weight of 1 carat. The Verger workshop was a successful, behind-the-scenes force creating jewels for Boucheron, Cartier, Tiffany, and Van Cleef & Arpels. Unlike those of many manufacturing jewelers, who merely produced work to order, Verger''s own original designs were particularly valued and sought after by these great Parisian Maison. Verger are known for their magnificent clocks featuring strongly defined shapes, stylized lines and global inspiration. For the Haute Joaillerie he created elaborate fancies of form and color contrast, as we see here in this important rose gold bracelet.

George Verger French Retro Diamond, Ruby, Rose Quartz, Platinum and Gold Bracelet Cuff

Marcus & Company Art Nouveau Blue Sapphire, Old European Diamond, Gold and Enamel Ring

An American Art Nouveau 18 karat gold, enamel, sapphire and diamond ring by Marcus & Co. The ring has a cushion-cut blue sapphire with an approximate weight of 8.65 carats, and 27 old European-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of .32 carat. The blue sapphire is most likely of Ceylon origin with no heat treatment evident. The center stone is held in place with gold tendrils that flow throughout the ring in extravagant Art Nouveau motifs. The multi-generational New York firm of Marcus & Co was founded by an ambitious young German immigrant who had trained at a prominent Dresden court jeweler. In 1892, after working with Charles Lewis Tiffany, Hermann Marcus and his sons William and George together set up a business that soon became a glittering New York society institution renowned not only for its superb diamonds, colored stones and pearls, but also its instantly recognizable, original design style. The firm produced great jewels in the Art Nouveau and Arts & Crafts sensibility, with George, the artist/designer, drawing inspiration from sources as diverse and exotic as the contemporary French masters, the Moghuls and Maharajahs, the garland style of the Ancien Regime, and the genius of Renaissance goldsmiths. George''s distinctive, confident hand was always discernible in Marcus creations. Working as a team with George, his brother William was a gem and pearl conn ... oisseur who travelled the world hunting fine gem material, including purchasing the entire production of never-before-seen black opal in Lightning Ridge Australia in 1908. Marcus exhibited at the 1900 Exposition Universelle in Paris, and their work won prizes at the prestigious Society of Arts & Crafts of Boston. Plique-a-jour enamel was an art in which Marcus & Co. excelled, creating jewels with unprecedented three-dimensional depth in this medium. The firm and family were well-known for their charitable activities and promotion of young jewelers such as Raymond Yard.

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Marcus & Company Art Nouveau Blue Sapphire, Old European Diamond, Gold and Enamel Ring

Tiffany & Co. Silver Bowl

An antique Tiffany & Co. New York, oval sterling silver bowl with floral design. This shallow bowl has pierced decorations, larger the ends and smaller on the sides. Blooming flowers are spaced around the bowl''s rim. The edge of the bowl is surrounded by a garlanded scroll.

Tiffany & Co. Silver Bowl

"Three-Light Piano Lily" Tiffany Lamp

A Tiffany Studios New York "Three-Light-Lily" glass and bronze piano lamp. The lamp features three golden Favrile glass shades suspended above a patinated bronze decorated "Artichoke" base. PROVENANCE: From a Los Angeles, CA Collection. A similar lamp is pictured in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988, p. 59, plate 212.

'Three-Light Piano Lily' Tiffany Lamp

"Eighteen-Light Lily" Tiffany Lamp

A Tiffany Studios New York Favrile glass and patinated bronze "Eighteen-light Lily" lamp with 18 golden iridescent glass "Lily" shades suspended over a patinated bronze "Lily Pad" base. Tiffany took this model to the Paris and Turin World''s Fairs around the turn of the century, where the American lamp made waves in the French Art Nouveau movement. Praised for its elegance, the Tiffany "Lily" has been called the "Aristocrat of the Garden." This particular lamp is of special historical importance, even compared with other models of the same design, because it is one of the earliest examples of the "Eighteen-Light Lily." It is outfitted with shades of particular delicacy and iridescence that would have accommodated the weak light from the then newly-invented light bulbs. The shades are mounted on slender curving stems that grow out of a base in the shape of water lily flowers and pads. A similar lamp is pictured in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988, p. 80, plate 313.

'Eighteen-Light Lily' Tiffany Lamp

"Counter Balance" Tiffany Lamp

A Tiffany Studios New York "Favrile" glass and patinated bronze desk lamp with a highly rare iridescent blue glass "Wave" design shade. This richly decorated shade is Dichroic, meaning it appears purple with silver highlights in reflected light, then changes to turquoise and royal blue when illuminated. The lamp base''s counterweight is decorated with a band of Tiffany''s famous "Turtleback" iridescent glass. The bottom of the base has an "artichoke feather" design. A similar lamp is pictured in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models," A. Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988, p. 87, plate 341.

'Counter Balance' Tiffany Lamp

Tiffany "Turtleback Ball" Desk Lamp

A Tiffany Studios New York "Turtleback Ball" desk lamp with favrile glass shade and patinated bronze base. The base features a long swing arm culminating in a single blue iridescent tulip shade with green highlights. The incredible balance between the beautiful, undulating weight of the turtleback glass in the piece''s base and the light, feathery iridescent shade creates a work that is, as a whole, quite complex and incredibly special among Tiffany''s oeuvre. A similar base and shade are pictured separately in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models, by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988. Sh"ade: p. 100, plate 396; base: p. 97, plate 382.

Tiffany  'Turtleback Ball' Desk Lamp

"Favrile" Tiffany Lamp

A Tiffany Studios New York "Damascene" Favrile glass and patinated bronze base. This "Damascene" table lamp is composed of transparent green, "Dychroide" glass and iridized glass combed decoration. Of particular note is the complexity of the iridization on the lamp that uses two distinct metallic oxides applied in two different techniques. Initially, a shell of transparent green glass was blown onto a core of opaque white glass core, forming the lamp''s white interior and thin transparent green exterior. Subsequently, "Dychroide" glass was carefully trailed twenty-nine times around the form. This particular variety of "Dychroide" glass, an innovation by Arthur J. Nash, production manager at the Tiffany Furnaces, has the unique quality of appearing green in reflected light and amber in transmitted light. This innovation gives a dynamic quality to Tiffany''s lamps that proved to be a true unification of form and function. When lit, the amber of the "Dychroide" glass causes the green to perceptually vibrate, further amplifying the effect of radiation in the lamp. The network of threads was subsequently marvered into the glass and evenly iridized with gold metallic oxides in the top half of the lamp and platinum metallic oxides in the bottom half of the lamp. Gold metal oxides that transition into strokes of platinum metallic oxides were then painted obliquely around the form. ... The piece was then blown and tooled into a dome shape. Evidence that the glass was first iridized then blown can be found in the subtle craquelure of the iridescence towards the base of the lamp. The double iridization creates a high luster and an added depth to the piece. A comb with twenty-nine teeth (equivalent to the number of "Dychroide" glass trails) was evenly raked through the semi-molten glass. The combing was purposefully offset from the trails so that they could still be seen in the final wave pattern. The green trails without "Dychroide" threads transmit the most light, creating a vivid amber starburst pattern when lit. The shade sits on a patinated bronze urn-shaped base with three arms supporting the shade. Provenance: Property from the Geyer Collection A similar base and shade are pictured separately in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988. Shade: p. 59, plate 209; base: p. 32, plate 89.

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'Favrile' Tiffany Lamp

"Three-Light Piano Lily" Tiffany Lamp

A Tiffany Studios New York glass and bronze piano table lamp featuring a "Three-Light-Lily" with golden Favrile glass shades suspended above a patinated bronze decorated "Artichoke" base. A similar lamp is pictured in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988, p. 59, plate 212.

'Three-Light Piano Lily' Tiffany Lamp

"Counter Balance" Tiffany Lamp

A Tiffany Studios New York "Counter Balance" glass and bronze table lamp, featuring a green Favrile glass "Damascene" shade on a patinated turtleback counter balance base. A similar shade and base are pictured separately in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988. Shade: p. 87, plate 342; base: p. 87, plate 341.

'Counter Balance' Tiffany Lamp

"Tulip" Tiffany Lamp

A Tiffany Studios New York "Tulip" glass and bronze table lamp. The shade is comprised of tulips in bloom in colors of pink, red, orange/yellow and yellow, all on a blue ground with green leaves. The shade sits atop a patinated bronze library base. A similar base is pictured in: Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models, by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors' Club, 1988, p. 75, plate 289.. A similar shade is pictured in: The Lamps of Tiffany, by Dr. Egon Neustadt, New York: The Fairfield Press, 1970, p. 135, plate 192.

'Tulip' Tiffany Lamp

Tiffany Studios New York ''Wisteria" Leaded Glass Window

An Art Nouveau ''Wisteria" leaded glass window by Tiffany Studios New York. Each blue wisteria panel is plated on the back side with various panels of confetti and striated glass forming individual petals of the wisteria flower, giving great depth of color. A large panel of striated amber glass is painted on the backside with a scenic design of a tree and pond, which is then plated over with a red panel creating great depth in the window. Wisteria flowers and vines are also the subject of a window pictured in: "Tiffany Windows: The indispensable book on Louis C. Tiffany''s masterworks," by Alastair Duncan, New York: Simon and Schuster, 1980, fig. 96.

Tiffany Studios New York ''Wisteria' Leaded Glass Window

Tiffany Studios New York "Five-Light Lily" Wall Sconces

A pair of Tiffany Studios New York patinated bronze and favrile glass "Five-Light Lily" sconces. The five curved stems are spaced around the wall fixture. They terminate in gold lily-shaped shades. Similar sconces are pictured in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988, p. 351, plate 1454.

Tiffany Studios New York 'Five-Light Lily' Wall Sconces

"Geometric Brick" Tiffany Chandelier

A Tiffany Studios New York leaded glass and bronze "Geometric" chandelier. The glass shade features a geometric "brick" pattern and is decorated in hues of green, flame orange and amber mottled glass. The shade hangs from a patinated bronze suspension. A similar hanging shade is pictured in: Alastair Duncan, "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models," Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club Ltd., 2007, p. 310, plate 1244.

'Geometric Brick' Tiffany Chandelier

"Geometric Brick" Tiffany Chandelier

A Tiffany Studios New York "Geometric" leaded glass and bronze chandelier. The green- and sunset-hued mottled glass shade features a geometric "brick" pattern. The shade hangs from a patinated bronze suspension. A similar hanging shade is pictured in: Alastair Duncan, "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models," Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club Ltd., 2007, p. 310, plate 1244.

'Geometric Brick' Tiffany Chandelier

Tiffany Glass and Bronze "Dragonfly" Chandelier

A Tiffany Studios New York "Dragonfly" glass and bronze chandelier. This elegant chandelier is composed of a choice selection of glass, which makes this an exceptional example of Tiffany''s iconic dragonfly lamp. The dragonflies are composed of dark green glass bodies, variegated blue glass wings and red glass eyes. The cabochon glass jewels that surround this chandelier depict emeralds, sapphires and topaz. The two top and three bottom borders are made up of various colors of rippled glass. This exciting glass composition rests upon a ground of green, green/blue and brown glass. While Tiffany was largely credited for his company''s glass innovations during his lifetime, recent archival research has shed light on the unsung heroes behind his genius. Two such figures were responsible for the astounding effects of this dragonfly lamp: Tiffany had gone through four chemists before he landed on Arthur J Nash, a chemist previously employed at the White House Glass Works in Stourbridge. England. It was Nash''s formulas, developed from before his employment at Tiffany, that became the core of Tiffany''s palette. Nash was no stranger to experimentation, adding unconventional materials such as birch bark and burnt oats to create his amber glass. Clara Driscoll, head of the Tiffany Studios Women''s Glass Cutting Department, designed the dragonfly lamp, earning much acclaim for h ... er artistic prowess in her time. (For more information on her work see "A New Light on Tiffany: Clara Driscoll and the Tiffany Girls," by Martine Eidelberg, Nina Gray, and Margaret K. Hofer, 2007.) Louis Comfort Tiffany''s "Dragonfly" lamps have become so iconic and loved because the artisans who made them were not limited in color as they were when making floral and geometric shades. We can imagine that the dragonflies that adorn the lower edge of the shade are flying low across a verdant field. Similar chandeliers are pictured in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988, p. 230, plate 891-893.

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Tiffany Glass and Bronze 'Dragonfly' Chandelier

"Nasturtium" Tiffany Floor Lamp

A Tiffany Studios New York "Nasturtium" glass and bronze table lamp. The shade, depicting red, orange and pink blossoms on a variegated translucent green ground, sits atop a Tiffany Studios New York patinated bronze "Junior Onion Decorated" floor lamp base. A similar shade is pictured in: "The Lamps of Tiffany," by Dr. Egon Neustadt, New York: The Fairfield Press, 1970, p. 155, plate 218. A similar base is pictured in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988, p. 206, plate 801.

'Nasturtium' Tiffany Floor Lamp

Tiffany Studios ''Wire Mesh Poppy'' Lamp

A Tiffany Studios New York "Wire Mesh Poppy" leaded glass and patinated bronze table lamp. The shade features crimson red poppy blossoms in various stages of bloom and a band of green leaves against a mottled blue-green and brown hued ground, evocative of radiance. Wire mesh centers delineate the pistils and stamens of the blossoms in full bloom and wire mesh is also applied as the veining for the leaves. The shade is further decorated with a lower multicolored blue and deep blue brick border and sits atop a patinated bronze "Twisted Vine" base. Similar shades are pictured in: "The Lamps of Tiffany," by Dr. Egon Neustadt, New York: The Fairfield Press, 1970, pp. 108-109; and in "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988, p. 162, plate 667. A similar base is pictured in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988, p. 98, plate 392.

Tiffany Studios ''Wire Mesh Poppy'' Lamp

"Nasturtium" Tiffany Lamp

A Tiffany Studios New York "Nasturtium" leaded glass and bronze table lamp, featuring a leaded glass shade depicting red, orange and yellow blossoms on a striking translucent green and blue ground. The shade sits on a patinated bronze base carved with flowers and curling tendrils reminiscent of fern fronds. A similar shade and base are pictured in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988. Shade: p. 155, plate 642; base: p. 107, plate 434. A similar shade, in a different color palate, is also pictured in: "The Lamps of Tiffany," by Dr. Egon Neustadt, New York: The Fairfield Press, 1970, p.155, plate 218 ; and in: "The Lamps of Tiffany Studios," by William Feldstein, Jr. and Alastair Duncan, New York: Harry N. Abrams, Inc., 1983, p. 119.

'Nasturtium' Tiffany Lamp

"Peony" Border Tiffany Floor Lamp

Tiffany Studios border "Peony" floor lamp with peony blossoms ranging in color from pink to pink/red to pink/purple, surrounded by leaves in various shades of green. The background culminates at the top of the shade with rows of multihued red/blue/cyan glass. The shade is further accented by two rectangular bottom border rows. The upper one is of mottled amber/green glass, and the bottom one is of rippled green glass. The shade sits atop a patinated bronze decorated senior floor base. A similar shade is pictured in: "The Lamps of Tiffany," by Dr. Egon Neustadt, New York: The Fairfield Press, 1970, p. 29, cat. no. 111; and in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988, p. 204, plate 786. A similar base is pictured in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models", by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988, p. 200, plate 777.

'Peony' Border Tiffany Floor Lamp

"DogWood" Tiffany Lamp

A Tiffany Studios New York "Dogwood" leaded glass and patinated bronze table lamp. The shade features a bouquet of pink, white and lavender dogwood blossoms against an blue and green mottled glass ground and is textured with Tiffany''s subtle use of rippled glass. The shade sits atop a patinated bronze decorated cushion base where the vines entwine themselves around the shaft of the base, almost to replicate the feeling of tendril like roots which evokes flower bulbs with overlaid scrolling bronze vines that wrap around the stem. The Dogwood was a well recorded favorite of Tiffany, who believed that the white flowers "reliably brighten things." The symbolic tradition of these bright, white flowers is quite rich; in Victorian times Dogwood flowers were given to young women by doting young men as a symbol of his affection. If the dogwood flower was kept it was a widely understood sign of mutual interest, however, if it was returned, it was the surest symbol of unrequited love. A similar base is pictured in: Alastair Duncan, "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models", Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club Ltd., 2007: p.75, plate 229.

'DogWood' Tiffany Lamp

"Peony" Tiffany Lamp

Tiffany Studios New York "Peony" leaded glass and patinated bronze table lamp. The shade features red, pink and purple peonies with mottled green leaves against a striated blue and lavender ground. The shade sits atop a decorated patinated bronze library base. A similar shade is pictured in: "The Lamps of Tiffany," by Dr. Egon Neustadt, New York: The Fairfield Press, 1970, p. 140, plate 199. a similar base is pictured in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988, p. 74, plate 286.

'Peony' Tiffany Lamp

Tiffany Studios New York Favrile Glass and Bronze "Harp" Floor Lamp

A Tiffany Studios New York "Harp" floor lamp with patinated bronze base and green blown-glass "Damascene" shade. This "Damascene" floor lamp is composed of a transparent green, "Dychroide" glass and iridized glass decoration. Of particular note is the complexity of the iridization on the lamp that uses two distinct metallic oxides applied in two different techniques. Initially, a shell of transparent green glass was blown onto a core of opaque white glass core, forming the lamp''s white interior and thin transparent green exterior. Subsequently, "Dychroide" glass was carefully trailed twenty-nine times around the form. This particular variety of "Dychroide" glass, an innovation by Arthur J. Nash, production manager at Tiffany Furnaces, has the unique quality of appearing green in reflected light and amber in transmitted light. This innovation gives a dynamic quality to Tiffany''s lamps that proved to be a true unification of form and function. When lit, the amber of the "Dychroide" glass causes the green to perceptually vibrate, further amplifying the effect of radiation in the lamp. The network of threads was subsequently marvered into the glass and evenly iridized with gold metallic oxides in the top half of the lamp and platinum metallic oxides in the bottom half of the lamp. Gold metal oxides that transition into strokes of platinum metallic oxides were then painted o ... bliquely around the form. The piece was then blown and tooled into a dome shape. Evidence that the glass was first iridized then blown can be found in the subtle craquelure of the iridescence towards the base of the lamp. The double iridization creates a high luster and an added depth to the piece. A comb with twenty-nine teeth (equivalent to the number of "Dychroide" glass trails) was evenly raked through the semi-molten glass. The combing was purposefully offset from the trails so that they could still be seen in the final wave pattern. The green trails without "Dychroide" threads transmit the most light, creating a vivid amber starburst pattern when lit. The lamp shade is surmounted by a cast bronze aperture ring with three ball screws and a liliform heat cap, terminating in a ball-shaped finial. The ventilation holes in the heat cap are subtly concealed by the five petals of the flower. The heat cap holds a light bulb and pull chain that terminates in an acorn pendant. The heat cap is supported on both sides by a harp with two component parts, a double ogee shoulder, and a single ogee base. The two parts of the harp are held together with a pin that allow the user to change the position of the light if they so wish. This mechanism is fitted with rosette motif side knobs that beautifully complement the liliform socket holder. The base of the harp splays into petals, connecting to the globular molding of a five-foot stem which swells, tapers, reswells, straightens, then reswells at the base. The stem is supported by five dartform feet. The cast bronze stem, harp, and base all have acid etched finishes giving them a red-speckled green patina. A similar base and shade are pictured separately in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988. Shade: p. 211, plate 827; base: p. 210, plate 821.

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Tiffany Studios New York Favrile Glass and Bronze 'Harp' Floor Lamp

"Bamboo" Tiffany Lamp

A Tiffany Studios New York "Bamboo" leaded glass and bronze table lamp, featuring a leaded glass shade depicting bamboo leaves and stems in mottled green and brown glass against an opaque white ground The shade sits atop a "Bamboo" base and is adorned by a "Bamboo" finial. The base is decorated with fronds and is segmented like a bamboo stem. Provenance: Private Collection, North Carolina, circa 1970 Thence by descent to the present owner, 2004 Pictured in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware," by Alastair Duncan, Antique Collectors'' Club, 2007, page 99.

'Bamboo' Tiffany Lamp

Tiffany Studios "Bouquet" Chandelier

A Tiffany Studios New York "Bouquet" leaded glass and patinated bronze chandelier. This particular shade has a remarkable range of multi-colored red hued peony blossoms on swirled blue and purple background with a beaded top and bottom rim. Tiffany Studios manufactured a number of 28" hanging cone chandeliers. Each depicted an artist''s vision of a "dream garden," rather than reproducing natural forms and colors. These shades are among the most vibrant and colorful produced by the Studios. Although the variety of colors employed gives the impression that all these shades are unique in fact they use a single design. A similar shade is pictured in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988, p. 216, plate 851. 

Tiffany Studios 'Bouquet' Chandelier

Tiffany Studios New York "Three-Light Lily" Wall Sconces

A pair of Tiffany Studios New York "Three-Light Lily" patinated bronze sconces with gold favrile shades. The fetching sconces are made visually interesting by the unusual decision to fashion a downward-facing bloom, giving off warm halos of light to the scenes in the room they occupy, rather than to the ceiling. Similar sconces are pictured in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models", by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988, p. 350, plate 1451.

Tiffany Studios New York 'Three-Light Lily' Wall Sconces

Tiffany "Maple Leaf" Floor Lamp

A Tiffany Studios New York "Maple Leaf" leaded glass and bronze floor lamp. The shade sits atop a Tiffany Studios New York patinated bronze "Decorated Junior" floor lamp base with Onion Bulb design. The glass selector at Tiffany Studios chose "mottled" glass in hues of green, blue and orange to depict the leaves of a Sugar Maple tree in dappled sunlight. The shade has a powder blue background meant to evoke the sky. Maples must be about 30 years old before they start seeding, so Tiffany chose to represent a mature tree in autumn, with three rows of green and orange samaras dropping through the sky to the ground, ensuring the species''s survival to the next generation. This rare and unusual "Maple Leaf" design was one of the last created at the Tiffany Studios, debuting in the 1915 Price Catalog. A similar shade and base are pictured separately in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988. Shade: p. 196, plates 768-769. Base: p. 206, plates 801-802.

Tiffany 'Maple Leaf' Floor Lamp

"Poinsettia" Tiffany Lamp

A Tiffany Studios New York "Poinsettia" leaded glass and bronze table lamp. The shade features brilliant red poinsettias surrounded by multicolored green leaves and stems with yellow and yellow/orange centers on a mottled yellow ground. The shade also features a mottled green glass border at the bottom rim of this shade. The shade sits atop a patinated bronze bump base. A similar shade is pictured in: "The Lamps of Tiffany," by Dr. Egon Neustadt, New York: The Fairfield Press, 1970, p. 80, plate 112. A similar base is pictured in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models", by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988: p. 75, plate 289.

'Poinsettia' Tiffany Lamp

Tiffany Studios New York "Stalactite" Chandelier

A Tiffany Studios New York golden stalactite chandelier with iridescent gold pulled feather decoration. A similar fixture is pictured in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models" by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988, p. 294, plate 1161.

Tiffany Studios New York 'Stalactite' Chandelier

"Gentian" Tiffany Lamp

A Tiffany Studios New York "Gentian" table lamp. The shade is composed of leaded green, blue and white glass featuring floral stalks enclosed in Gothic arches. The middle row of the flaring apron is comprised of a row of uncut green gems. The patinated bronze base features openwork floral stalk decoration. This unique combination is rarely seen in Tiffany lamps. Pictured in: "The Lamps of Tiffany" by Egon Neustadt, p. 64, no. 90

'Gentian' Tiffany Lamp

"Tulip" Tiffany Lamp

A Tiffany Studios New York "Tulip" table lamp. The shade features brilliant red tulips with green leaves against a blue ground and sits atop a gilt bronze "Mock Turtle" base. The flowers are recreated with stunning realism. In some cases, all six petals of some of the blossoms can be seen. The tulips are ingeniously overlapped to create the illusion of depth. Because of the sky blue ground on the upper portion of the shade and the earthy tones present throughout the lower apron, one has the impression of gazing at a tulip bed on a sunny afternoon. The lamp base and shade are pictured separately in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models", by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antiques Collectors'' Club Ltd.: base, p. 110, cat. 454, base # 587; shade, p. 179, cat. 682, shade # 1546. A similar shade is also pictured in: "The Lamps of Tiffany", by Dr. Egon Neustadt, New York: The Fairfield Press, 1970, p. 150, plate 212.

'Tulip' Tiffany Lamp

"Crocus" Tiffany Lamp

A Tiffany Studios New York "Crocus/Tulip" leaded glass and patinated bronze table lamp. A bouquet of deep amber, red, gold and yellow hued crocus blossoms with hints of red in various stages of bloom decorates this shade with a sunset ground. The shade sits atop a four footed "Pineapple" base decorated with green glass cabochons. A similar base and shade are pictured in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988. Shade: p. 137, plate 575; base: p. 64, plate 247.

'Crocus' Tiffany Lamp

"Jonquil-Daffodil" Tiffany Lamp

A Tiffany Studios New York gilt bronze and Favrile glass "Jonquil-Daffodil" lamp featuring a dome-shaped shade divided into an upper section comprising sixteen downturned trumpet narcissi blossoms in mottled yellow and creamy white colored glass surrounded by mottled blue and green colored stems against a mottled blue, green and blue geometric band.The lower section is decorated with three undulating rows comprising forty-eight daffodil blossoms, with opalescent and creamy white colored petals and yellow orange centers, continuing to a mottled green and blue geometric border. The shade rests upon a gilt bronze "Twisted Vine" base. Pictured in "The Lamps of Tiffany" by Egon Neustadt, page 143. A similar base is pictured in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988. base: p. 94, plates 373-374.

'Jonquil-Daffodil' Tiffany Lamp

Tiffany Studios "Prism" Chandelier

A Tiffany Studios New York glass and bronze "Prism" chandelier, featuring a decorated Favrile glass shade hanging in a circular row of iridescent gold glass "Prisms," all of which are suspended from a gilt bronze crown with hanging beaded detail. The shade is encircled by six green Favrile tulip shades with pulled feather decoration. A similar fixture is pictured in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988, p. 318, plate 1271.

Tiffany Studios 'Prism' Chandelier

"Dragonfly" Tiffany Lamp

A Tiffany Studios New York leaded glass and patinated bronze "Dragonfly" table lamp. This shade features six dragonflies with green bodies and amber hued wings against a blue, green and yellow ground that fades into yellow at the top. Each dragonfly is adorned with crimson-colored glass eyes, and on one of the dragonflies the eyes are shifted so as to make it appear as if the insect is turning its head. The scene is contained in a lower border of yellow-green mottled glass with hints of blue. The shade sits atop a "Blown" glass base of alternating dark and lighter green, sitting on patinated bronze lily pads. Louis Comfort Tiffany''s "Dragonfly" lamps have become so iconic and loved because the artisans who made them were not limited in color as they were when making floral and geometric shades. Here we see the background fading from a bright green-blue to a yellow-green, and we can imagine that the dragonflies who adorn the lower edge of the shade are flying low across a verdant field. Similar shades, in various colors, are pictured in: "The Lamps of Tiffany", by Dr. Egon Neustadt, New York: The Fairfield Press, 1970, pp. 102-105. A similar base is pictured in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models", by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988, p. 39, plate 130.

'Dragonfly' Tiffany Lamp

"Daffodil" Tiffany Lamp

A Tiffany Studios New York "Daffodil" leaded glass shade featuring a bouquet of daffodil flowers with mottled green leaves and stems branching down from the top of the shade and set against a mottled golden ground. The shade is further decorated with a two-tone green and gold mottled glass brick pattern border. It sits on a patinated bronze rib base. A similar shade and base are pictured separately in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988. Shade: p. 153, plate 634; base: p. 77, plate 297. The shade is also pictured in: "The Lamps of Tiffany," by Dr. Egon Neustadt, New York: The Fairfield Press, 1970, p. 106, plate 154.

'Daffodil' Tiffany Lamp

Tiffany Studios Golden Stalactite Chandelier

A Tiffany Studios New York golden stalactite chandelier with stalactite shades in pulled feather motif suspended from a patinated bronze and brass chain and pole system. This chandelier features a larger central stalactite surrounded by 6 smaller stalactites. The stalactite shades are decorated in gold and brown on a yellow background. In 1897 Mark Twain embarked on a lengthy tour of North Africa and the Holy Land. Two years later he published "Innocents Abroad," a widely read and celebrated account of these travels. Inspired by Twain''s work, Louis Comfort Tiffany traveled to Northern Africa the same year "Innocents Abroad" was published. What he found in Northern Africa and Southern Spain was a seemingly an endless trove of artistic inspiration. Upon he returned he immediately created an oil painting titled "Market Day at Tangiers," depicting exactly that and particularly highlighting the Islamic architecture surrounding the market square in the city. Tiffany would later model the fountain court of his home at Laurelton Hall after the Court of the Lions at the Moorish palace La Alhambra in Granada. The Laurelton Hall fountain court, which was later described as "the soul of the house," by Tiffany scholars, was filled with arabesque texturing in the walls that created domed, stylized shelves called "muqarnas," a traditionally Moorish architectural feature. Tiffany so loved t ... he muqarnas walls that he designed Favrile glass forms to fit in the indentations, and, later still, Favrile glass shades, like those in this chandelier, to mimic and compliment their shape. A similar chandelier is pictured in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988, p. 299, plate 1186.

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Tiffany Studios Golden Stalactite Chandelier

"Dragonfly" Tiffany Lamp

A Tiffany Studios New York leaded glass and patinated bronze "Dragonfly" table lamp. This shade features six dragonflies with green bodies and green-hued wings against a green and yellow ground that fades into the green-hued top. Each dragonfly is adorned with amber-colored glass eyes. The scene is contained in a lower border of yellow-orange-hued mottled glass. The shade sits atop a scroll base comprised of gilt bronze scroll embellishments circling the foot of the base. Louis Comfort Tiffany''s "Dragonfly" lamps have become so iconic and loved because the artisans who made them were not limited in color as they were when making floral and geometric shades. Here we see the background fading from a bright green-blue to a yellow-green, and we can imagine that the dragonflies who adorn the lower edge of the shade are flying low across a verdant field. Note: "A Dragonfly lamp was one of Tiffany''s first recorded lampshades, having been shown at the Grafton Galleries in London in 1899. This closely related model presented here was introduced the following year at the 1900 Paris World''s Fair. Equally important, here we know the name of the lamp''s designer: Clara Driscoll. Louis C. Tiffany made it a point to suppress all mention of the names of his company''s workers but, in this instance, the information regarding authorship came from an article about Driscoll and thus bypa ... ssed Tiffany''s censorship. It (the shade) was cited on the 1913 Price List, and it remained in production for yet another decade, with some eleven examples being made between 1921 and 1924." From "The Lamps of Louis Comfort Tiffany," Eidelberg, Frelinghuysen, McClelland, and Rachen, Thames & Hudson, 2005, pp. 186-88.

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'Dragonfly' Tiffany Lamp

"Belted Turtleback" Tiffany Lamp

A Tiffany Studios New York glass and bronze "Belted Turtleback" table lamp, featuring a large band of iridescent green "Turtleback" tiles against a mottled brick pattern ground, atop a rare Tiffany Studios New York green and red patinated bronze lamp base with pierced Onion Bulb design. "Turtleback" tiles were an early invention of Tiffany''s, consisting of amber or blue glass and coated with an iridescence. His experiments predated the founding of Tiffany Studios and distinguished him as a luminary of glass innovation. For the texture of his turtleback shells, Tiffany was inspired by the Neolithic Egyptian turtle carapace scale rings and bracelets excavated in Cyprus. For his Egyptian fete (party) in 1913, Tiffany served turtle along with suckling pig and frog legs. Shade pictured in Tiffany Lamps and Metalware, An Illustrated Reference to Over 2000 Models, by Alastair Duncan, p.131, plate #1434. A similar base is pictured in: Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models, by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988, p. 85, plate 330.

'Belted Turtleback' Tiffany Lamp

"Peacock" Tiffany Lamp

A Tiffany Studios New York "Peacock" leaded glass and bronze table lamp. The peacock was one of Tiffany''s favorite motifs. Here, brilliantly vari-colored peacock feathers against a rich green/purple/blue/mauve/yellow-orange ground create the pattern of the shade, with the quills of the feathers prominently visible and the twenty peacock eyes arranged in two staggered rows. Brick borders of mauve, orange-yellow and cream/green glass and a scalloped apron further decorate the shade, which sits atop a patinated bronze "Peacock" base specially designed for it, with "Peacock" leaded mosaic glass in "eyes" at the foot of the base. The play of light through the mottled glass, with its regal color palate, imbues the shade with the beguiling mystery of real peacock feathers. A similar lamp is pictured in: "The Lamps of Tiffany", by Dr. Egon Neustadt, New York: The Fairfield Press, 1970, p. 139, plate 197. The shade is also pictured in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models", by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antiques Collectors'' Club Ltd., p. 142, cat. 592. Also pictured in: "The Lamps of Tiffany Studios", by William Feldstein, Jr. & Alastair Duncan. p. 130-131. Provenance: A prominent New York City surgeon 2019. With Macklowe Gallery New York 2015.

'Peacock' Tiffany Lamp

"Abalone Linenfold" Desk Lamp by Tiffany Studios New York

A Tiffany Studios "Abalone Linenfold" lamp on a gilt-bronze base, with mother-of-pearl decorative insets in the base and the top of the shade. The shade consists of yellow glass panels textured to resemble folded cloth. The leading is gilt to match the lamp base. A similar lamp is pictured in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988, p. 192, plate 747.

'Abalone Linenfold' Desk Lamp by Tiffany Studios New York

"Peony" Tiffany Lamp

A Tiffany Studios New York "Peony" table lamp. The shade features three different peony cultivars from Tiffany''s garden at Laurelton Hall: the Greek Peony (Paeonia parnassica), (Cup of Shining Night), and Shima Nishiki. This "Peony" lamp is an unusual variant featuring gold-Ruby drapery glass. This rare and costly glass variety was colored using gold chloride and produced in limited quantities between 1888 and 1890. Distinguishing this lamp is the nuance in coloration and texture. The palette of the lamp includes three different types of blue, five different types of green and three different types of red in a plethora of combinations and textures. The lampshade sits atop a rare Tiffany Studios New York patinated bronze lamp base with pierced Onion Bulb design. A similar shade is pictured in: "The Lamps of Louis Comfort Tiffany", by Martin Eidelberg, Alice Cooney Frelinghuysen, Nancy A. McClelland, and Lars Rachen, New York: The Vendome Press, 2005, p. 21, plate 20. A similar base is pictured in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models", by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988, p. 85, plate 330.

'Peony' Tiffany Lamp

Art Nouveau Bronze and Favrile Glass Table Candelabrum by Tiffany.

An American Art Nouveau patinated bronze and favrile glass mounted table candelabrum by Tiffany Studios New York. The candelabrum has six arms. Each candle holder is decorated with green favrile jewels. A similar candelabrum is pictured in: Alastair Duncan, "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models", Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club Ltd., 2007, p. 385, plate 1571.

Art Nouveau Bronze and Favrile Glass Table Candelabrum by Tiffany.

Tiffany Studios New York "Tel el Amarna" Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York "Tel el Amarna" Favrile glass vase with an iridescent blue body and a brilliant cobalt blue foot and rim featuring an Egyptian-inspired grey and white "Tel el Amarna" motif. Similary decorated vases are pictured in: "The Art of Louis Comfort Tiffany," by Tessa Paul, New York: Exeter Books, 1987, p. 75.

Tiffany Studios New York 'Tel el Amarna' Vase

Tiffany Studios New York "Tel el Amarna" Glass Pedestal Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York Art Nouveau Favrile glass pedestal vase. Iridescent sepia body with iridescent gold shoulders featuring a sage-green and beige Egyptian-inspired ''Tel el Armana" motif. A similar vase is pictured in: "Louis Comfort Tiffany at Tiffany & Co.," by John Loring, New York: Harry N. Abrams, Inc., 2002, p. 160.

Tiffany Studios New York 'Tel el Amarna' Glass Pedestal Vase

Glass "Paperweight" Tiffany Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York Art Nouveau ''paperweight'' glass vase. White blossoms with pink millefiori florets sprinkled throughout a green pulled-leaf motif, all featured on a clear background. The paperweight technique involved fusing thin rods of transparent glass in a variety of colors. The resulting thicker rod was cut into thin pieces and were then worked into clear glass. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: "Louis Comfort Tiffany at Tiffany & Co.," by John Loring, New York: Harry N. Abrams, Inc., 2002, p. 158.

Glass 'Paperweight' Tiffany Vase

Tiffany Studios "Grapevine" Picture Frame

An Art Nouveau gilt bronze and glass "Grapevine" picture frame by Tiffany Studios New York with an oval aperture. A similar frame is pictured in: "Tiffany Desk Sets," by William R. Holland, Atglen, PA: Schiffer, 2008, p. 95, figure 3-39.

Tiffany Studios 'Grapevine' Picture Frame

Tiffany Studios "Pine Needle" Picture Frame

An Art Nouveau gilt bronze "Pine Needle" picture frame by Tiffany Studios New York. The frame is rectangular with an oval center display and decorated in gilt bronze over mottled amber glass. A similar frame is pictured in: "Tiffany Desk Sets," by William R. Holland, Atglen, PA: Schiffer, 2008, p. 63, fig. 2-44.

Tiffany Studios 'Pine Needle' Picture Frame

Tiffany Studios New York Art "Peacock Eye" Glass Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York Art Nouveau "Peacock Eye" glass vase by Louis Comfort Tiffany. Decorated with blue peacock eye feathers on an iridescent blue and green ground.

Tiffany Studios New York Art 'Peacock Eye' Glass Vase

Tiffany Studios New York Centerpiece

A Tiffany Studios New York Art Nouveau centerpiece, featuring deep-blue green iridescent Favrile glass decorated with a iridescent green leaf and vine decoration. The centerpiece has a removable "frog" to hold cut flowers. A similar centerpiece is pictured in: "Tiffany Favrile Art Glass," by Moise S. Steeg, Jr., Atglen, PA: Schiffer, 1997, p. 149.

Tiffany Studios New York Centerpiece

Tiffany Studios Scarab and Mosaic Box

A Tiffany Studios New York "Scarab" mosaic and gilt bronze covered box. This round box is decorated with vivid mosaics of red, yellow, orange, green, turquoise blue and black. The cover has three applied favrile glass scarab beetles. The scarabs confirm Tiffany''s fascination for Egyptian archeological discoveries and are a fine expression of his inspiration. Louis Comfort Tiffany first traveled to Egypt in 1872, two years after the opening of the Suez Canal and near the height of the ensuing American "Eyptomania." Tiffany was immediately taken with the ancient cultural legacies and starkly exotic landscape of 19th Century Egypt, and upon his return to New York he devoted himself to the rendering of several large scale oil paintings depicting the landscape, ancient wonders and then modern architecture of Cairo and the surrounding area. From that point onward the aesthetic language of ancient Egypt was never far from Tiffany''s mind, and it would appear in various motif forms in various works for the rest of his artistic career. Those works that demonstrate Tiffany''s great passion and careful study of ancient Egypt are now considered among the rarest and most collectible of his oeuvre. After a second Nile River Cruise in 1908 Tiffany resolved to celebrate his long enchantment with all things Egyptian with a Fete that would be written about for decades to come. Invitatio ... ns to the strictly Egyptian-themed evening were on aged parchment in both hieroglyphs and English, and hand delivered to each of the bash''s 400 guests. Each of the attendees had to submit their costumes to astrict guidelines of authenticity overseen by a committee comprised of Egyptologists and authorities on costume art. Egyptian-inspired music, composed by Theodore Steinway, was performed by the New York Philharmonic Orchestra as Pedro de Cordoba, playing Marc Antony, brought gifts of Favrile glass to a posing Cleopatra. Tiffany''s sons-in-law were dressed as Roman lictors, while his daughters were adorned with rare scarab objects from Tiffany''s personal collection, fashioned as jewelry. Robert De Forest, the famed president of the Metropolitan Museum of American Art, arrived as the one of the Maharajas of Punjab; John D. Rockefeller attended dressed as a pharaoh and Egyptian beauty queens wearing gigantic scarab wings served them North African fare. Tiffany spared no detail and no expense to recreate the opulence of ancient Egyptian courts, and created many decorative arts especially for the occasion. Tiffany was particularly interested in the importance of the scarab beetle in Egyptian mythology, and sparingly employed decorative depictions of the insect in his works, most probably due to his understanding of the supreme and sacred nature of the motif. However, those works that did include scarabs executed in the ancient Egyptian style are considered of special personal importance to Tiffany, and are especially important to find in Tiffany collections. The Egyptian name for the beetle is derived from the verb "to be created" or "to come into the world." The Egyptians considered the beetle to be the incarnation of the creator god, who had regenerated himself cyclically. The beetle was thus understood as a potent symbol of rebirth, and was tied to understandings of the daily rising sun. A similar mosaic box is pictured in: Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models, by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988 p. 433, plate 1716; and in: Louis C. Tiffany: The Garden Museum Collection, by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 2004, p. 370.

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Tiffany Studios Scarab and Mosaic Box

Tiffany Studios Covered Box

An Art Nouveau enamel covered box by Louis Comfort Tiffany. The intricate design features vines with tendrils culminating in paisleys, almost replicating a Henna pattern. It is an example of Indian patterns that influenced Tiffany''s work. In the late 1870''s Tiffany''s partnership with Lockwood de Forest resulted in an introduction of East Indian craft motifs that contributed to their revival within the context of Gilded Age America. This covered box is an example of such influence, with its gold background and highlights of blue enamel paisleys. Several pieces of Tiffany''s enamelware are marked with a four-digit number preceded by an "S." Since there are only a handful of such objects available, it may be that Tiffany designed them for himself, or to fulfill special commissions. The Tiffany & Co. archives contains many drawings marked "S.O." for items sold as commissioned. Perhaps "S" was Louis Tiffany''s way of identifying those earmarked for an exhibition, a special client, or himself. A similar jar is featured in: "The Jewelry and Enamels of Louis Comfort Tiffany," by Janet Zapata, p. 69.

Tiffany Studios Covered Box

Tiffany Studios New York Favrile Sprinkler Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York decorated Favrile glass rose water sprinkler vase. The vase is iridescent gold, with undertones of pink and blue. This "gooseneck" design is considered one of Tiffany''s most original and delicate forms, with a molded peacock feather decoration that circles the bulbous portion of the vase and continues along the mouth until fading in the neck. The "gooseneck" design is considered one of Tiffany''s most original and delicate forms, inspired by Persian rosewater sprinklers. Tiffany first became familiar with the rosewater sprinkler through his early mentorship by Edward C. Moore of Tiffany and Company. Moore was a dedicated collector of Oriental art and a significant influence on Tiffany''s aesthetic. Moore''s 16th-century Persian rosewater sprinkler is now on view at the Metrpolitan Museum of Art. According to folklore, Persian rosewater sprinklers were used as "containers for tears." The vessel, named ashkdan, was meant to collect the sorrows of wives separated from their husbands. The story goes that a husband who had to go away for a prolonged period on business, war, or pilgrimage to Mecca gave an ashkdan to his wife so that she could weep into it during his absence and consequently prove how unhappy she had been without him. Tiffany promoted his rosewater sprinklers by using them as props in his infamous Egyptian Fete. An Egyptian slave girl, ... played by Tiffany''s friend Ethel Whitman, sprinkled rosewater to herald the entrance of Cleopatra. A similar sprinkler is pictured in: "Tiffany Favrile Art Glass", by Moise S. Steeg, Jr., Atglen, PA: Schiffer Publishing, Ltd., 1997, p. 33.

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Tiffany Studios New York Favrile Sprinkler Vase

Tiffany Studios New York Enamel Box

A Tiffany Studios New York "Olive" covered box by, executed by the Enamelware Department of Stonebridge Glass Company, New York. This fabulous masterpiece is composed of enameled copper. The cover is decorated with olives, purple-brown copper branches and deep green leaves. From Paul Doros: "This enameled covered box clearly reveals the quality and innovative artistry that led to the company winning a gold medal at that world''s fair. It is of a familiar form but features an unusual motif and palette. Both the cover and slightly ribbed body have a repoussé design of ripening olives and pendant leaves on sinuous branches, one of them forming an irregular sculptural handle. The gold background is particularly noteworthy. Most Tiffany enamels of this type have a ground in shades of either red or blue. The background used in this object is perfectly suited, as it suggests olives ripening under a warm, golden sun. Hints of gold glimmer and sparkle through the slightly iridescent aubergine and purple olives, as well as the green leaves, adding to the illusion. It was pieces such as this one that caused contemporary critics to proclaim Tiffany''s enamels as "rare works of art" as well as "visions of delight." Paul Doros is former curator of glass at the Chrysler Museum of Art (Norfolk, Virginia) and author of The Art Glass of Louis Comfort Tiffany (New York: Vendome Press) ... , 2013. PROVENANCE Parke-Bernet Galleries Inc., New York Private Collection, New York, circa 1965 Thence by descent to the present owners LITERATURE Martin Eidelberg and Nancy McClelland, "Behind the Scenes of Tiffany Glassmaking: The Nash Notebooks," New York, 2001, pp. 21 and 178 (for the model executed in pottery) Alastair Duncan, "Louis C. Tiffany: The Garden Museum Collection," Woodbridge, Suffolk, 2004, pp. 466 (for the model executed in pottery) and 471 (for the model executed in bronze pottery)

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Tiffany Studios New York Enamel Box

Tiffany Studios New York "Tel el Amarna" Vase

A rare and monumental Tiffany Studios New York "Tel el Amarna" Favrile glass vase with an iridescent cobalt blue body and a brilliant turquoise blue foot and rim. Vases with zigzag decoration such as this have been commonly called "Tel el Amarna," after the decorative motifs of ancient Egypt. However, recent research has shown that Tiffany actually intended these vases to be referred to as "Byzantine," with the exception of vases featuring the brilliant blue color associated with the blue faience of the Eighteenth Dynasty of Amarna, Egypt, circa 1346 BC. This is the largest and most brilliantly colored vase of this genre that Macklowe Gallery has had the privilege of owning in our 50 years specializing in the artistic glass of Louis Comfort Tiffany. Similary decorated vases are pictured in: "The Art of Louis Comfort Tiffany", by Tessa Paul, New York: Exeter Books, 1987, p. 75.

Tiffany Studios New York 'Tel el Amarna' Vase

Tiffany Favrile Paperweight "Daffodil" Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York Favrile paperweight glass "Daffodil" vase, featuring yellow flowers with dark centers extending above green leaves. The paperweight technique involved fusing thin rods of transparent glass in a variety of colors. The resulting thicker rod was but into thin pieces and were then worked into clear glass. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: "Louis Comfort Tiffany at Tiffany & Co.," by John Loring, New York: Harry N. Abrams, Inc., 2002, page 158.

Tiffany Favrile Paperweight 'Daffodil' Vase

Tiffany Studios New York "Tel el Amarna" Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York glass vase. A wide-shouldered, unique translucent gold body with a band of green colored Egyptian-inspired "Tel-El-Amarna" design around the neck. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: "Tiffany at Auction," by Alastair Duncan, New York: Rizzoli, 1981, p. 17, cat. no. 18.

Tiffany Studios New York 'Tel el Amarna' Vase

Tiffany Studios New York Favrile Vase

A Favrile glass vase by Tiffany Studios New York. The vase has a background of iridescent medium and turquoise blue swirls that is overlaid with thick opaque pink geometric decoration.

Tiffany Studios New York Favrile Vase

Tiffany Studios New York Glass "Gooseneck" Sprinkler Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York Favrile glass rose water sprinkler vase. The graceful vase is made of iridescent gold glass. The "gooseneck" design is considered one of Tiffany''s most original and delicate forms, inspired by Persian rosewater sprinklers. Tiffany first became familiar with the rosewater sprinkler through his early mentorship by Edward C. Moore of Tiffany and Company. Moore was a dedicated collector of Oriental art and a significant influence on Tiffany''s aesthetic. Moore''s 16th-century Persian rosewater sprinkler is now on view at the Metrpolitan Museum of Art. According to folklore, Persian rosewater sprinklers were used as "containers for tears." The vessel, named ashkdan, was meant to collect the sorrows of wives separated from their husbands. The story goes that a husband who had to go away for a prolonged period on business, war, or pilgrimage to Mecca gave an ashkdan to his wife so that she could weep into it during his absence and consequently prove how unhappy she had been without him. Tiffany promoted his rosewater sprinklers by using them as props in his infamous Egyptian Fete. An Egyptian slave girl, played by Tiffany''s friend Ethel Whitman, sprinkled rosewater to herald the entrance of Cleopatra. A similar sprinkler is pictured in: "Tiffany Favrile Art Glass," by Moise S. Steeg, Jr., Atglen, PA: Schiffer Publishing, Ltd., 1997, p. 33; and in: "Tiffany at Auction," by Alastair Duncan, New York: Rizzoli, 1981, p. 19, cat. no. 27.

Tiffany Studios New York Glass 'Gooseneck' Sprinkler Vase

Cypriote vase by Tiffany Studios New York

A silver colored Cypriote vase by Tiffany Studios New York. The body of the vase is subtly ribbed. The ribs extend into the vase''s neck, where they are more pronounced. Cypriote is a textured glass achieved at Tiffany Glass and Decorating Company by rolling glass over a marble or iron surface covered with pulverized bits of the same glass. Its iridescence and bubbles resembled the decomposed surface of Roman glass discovered during archeological explorations on the island of Cyprus, hence its name. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in:" Timeless Beauty: The Art of Louis Comfort Tiffany," Atglen, PA: Schiffer Publishing, 2016, p. 66.

Cypriote vase by Tiffany Studios New York

Floral Vase by Tiffany Studios New York

A Favrile flower form vase by Louis Comfort Tiffany. The vase is iridescent yellow, with hints of orange, and has a ruffled rim. Favrile glass vases in the shapes of stylized flowers were among the earliest creations of the Tiffany Glass and Decorating Company, forerunner of Tiffany Studios. Initial examples of this technique date from approximately 1894, although later pieces show greater refinement. Flower forms have great variety in stem length and rim shape. A similar vase is pictured in: "Tiffany at Auction," by Alastair Duncan, New York: Rizzoli, 1981, p. 24, cat. no. 44; "The Tiffany Collection of the Chrysler Museum at Norfolk," by Paul E. Doros, Richmond, VA: W. M. Brown & son, Inc., 1978, p. 32, cat. no. 26; "Louis Comfort Tiffany," by Jacob Baal-Teshuva, New York: Taschen, 2001, p. 260; "The Art Glass of Louis Comfort Tiffany," by Paul E. Doros, New York: The Vendome Press, 2013, p. 74, fig. 27.

Floral Vase by Tiffany Studios New York

Tiffany Studios New York Favrile Glass Vase

A Louis Comfort Tiffany favrile glass "Red Hooked Feather" vase, featuring a rich red color enhanced by an iridescent multicolored pulled feather motif that encircles the vase. Favrile is the trade name Tiffany gave to his blown art glass. The name derives from the Latin word fabrilis, meaning "made by hand." The technique was developed at the Tiffany Glass and Decorating Company in the mid-1890s using filaments from batches of differently colored glass and working the material while the glass was still molten. Ornamentation was added before the piece had its final shape, so that the decoration became fully integrated into the vessel. The technique was used in both decorative vases and functional pieces such as tableware (bowls, goblets, carafes) and lamp shades. Tiffany intended the favrile designation as a guarantee to current customers and future collectors of the fine quality of these objects.

Tiffany Studios New York Favrile Glass Vase

Tiffany Studios New York Bluish Green Favrile Glass Vase

A bluish green Favrile glass vase by Louis Comfort Tiffany featuring a pulled silver iridescent border. Favrile is the trade name Tiffany gave to his blown art glass. The name derives from the Latin word fabrilis, meaning "made by hand." The technique was developed at the Tiffany Glass and Decorating Company in the mid-1890s using filaments from batches of differently colored glass and working the material while the glass was still molten. Ornamentation was added before the piece had its final shape, so that the decoration became fully integrated into the vessel. The technique was used in both decorative vases and functional pieces such as tableware (bowls, goblets, carafes) and lamp shades. Tiffany intended the favrile designation as a guarantee to current customers and future collectors of the fine quality of these objects.

Tiffany Studios New York Bluish Green Favrile Glass Vase

Decorated Glass Vase by Louis Comfort Tiffany

A decorated glass vase by Louis Comfort Tiffany. This vase has a vivid iridescent blue pulled feather design on an iridescent charcoal background. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: "The Art Glass of Louis Comfort Tiffany," by Paul E. Doros, New York: The Vendome Press, 2013, p. 212, fig. 169.

Decorated Glass Vase by Louis Comfort Tiffany

Intaglio Vase by Tiffany Studios New York

A Tiffany Studios New York intaglio carved cameo glass vase, featuring white flowers with blue and purple accents, dark blue scarabs adorning the white petals and green vines with leaves against an iridescent blue/green ground.

Intaglio Vase by Tiffany Studios New York

Tiffany Studios "Agate" Vase

An Agate Favrile glass vase by Tiffany Studios New York. This vase has dark vertical lines on a beige ground. The vertical theme is further emphasized by several ribs in the body of the vase, Louis Comfort Tiffany''s love of nature extended to the pebbles and small stones that washed up on the shores of Long Island and New England. This inspired him a create a glass that imitated cut agate. Illustrated by this vase, the intent was to suggest the striations found in veined stones, which were usually very opaque.

Tiffany Studios 'Agate' Vase

Tiffany Studios New York Favrile Paperweight Vase

A Favrile "paperweight" vase by Tiffany Studios New York. The earliest examples of "paperweight" objects appeared around 1900, Louis Comfort Tiffany loved this technique of encasing a design within a dome of transparent glass because it was a great vehicle for expressing his love of nature, particularly flowers. This vase is internally decorated with gladiolus flowers with yellow, green and purple threads. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: "The Art Glass of Louis Comfort Tiffany," by Paul E. Doros, New York: The Vendome Press, 2013, p. 136, fig.82. Also pictured in "Louis Comfort Tiffany," by Jacob Baal-Teshuva, New York: Taschen, 2001, page 291.

Tiffany Studios New York Favrile Paperweight Vase

Tiffany Morning Glory Paperweight Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York "Paperweight" vase by Louis Comfort Tiffany. A major innovation in Tiffany''s work around 1900 involved the encasement of hot glass with an additional transparent layer--a technique associated with paperweights. The added layer of clear glass produced a three-dimensional effect, as though the plants existed in a lower level, beneath the surface. Most of Tiffany''s early "Paperweight" vases had a clear body with a gold iridescent core, adding to the poetic effect. This particular vase displays purple and white cream morning glories with green veined leaves and stems against an iridescent translucent light green hued ground. The difficulty of creating naturalistic imagery in hot glass should not be underestimated. The detailed representation of the morning glory blossoms with their star-like markings makes this vase highly desirable. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: "Louis C. Tiffany: Artist for the Ages," by Marilynn A. Johnson, London: Scala Publishers, Ltd., 2005, p. 150, ca. not. 56; "The Art Glass of Louis Comfort Tiffany", by Paul E. Doros, New York: The Vendome Press, 2013, p. 140, fig. 89; and in: "Louis Comfort Tiffany at Tiffany & Co.," by John Loring, New York: Harry N. Abrams, Inc., 2002, page 163.

Tiffany Morning Glory Paperweight Vase

Jeweled Bronze Candlestick by Tiffany Studios New YorK

A jeweled bronze candlestick by Tiffany Studios New York featuring a decorated foot and a slender stem. The stem branches out in three arms with candle cups adorned with iridescent glass jewels. The candle stick includes a snuffer and bronze bobeche inserts for each candle cup. PROVENANCE: From the Unreserved Estate of Lynda Cunningham. A similar candlestick is pictured in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988, p. 384, plate 1566.

Jeweled Bronze Candlestick by Tiffany Studios New YorK

Bronze Bud Vase by Tiffany Studios New York

A patinated bronze bud vase by Tiffany Studios New York. The piece has seven small vases, six of which surround a raise seventh vase. Its six curving supports rest on a base in the shape of a water lily. PROVENANCE: From the Unreserved Estate of Lynda Cunningham. A similar bud vase is pictured in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988, p. 370, plate 1517.

Bronze Bud Vase by Tiffany Studios New York

"Pine-Needle" Covered Jewelry Box by Tiffany Studios New York.

A green glass and bronze "Pine-Needle" covered jewelry box by Tiffany Studios New York. PROVENANCE: From the Unreserved Estate of a Lady Various pieces from this pattern are pictured in: "Tiffany Desk Sets," by William R. Holland, Atglen, PA: Schiffer, 2008, pp. 47-74.

'Pine-Needle' Covered Jewelry Box by Tiffany Studios New York.

Tiffany Studios New York Mosaic Candle Lamp

A Tiffany Studios New York Favrile glass and patinated bronze mosaic candle lamp. The mosaic candlestick base has inlaid panels of glass shading from green to blue running vertically along the side of the candlestick. The bronze candlestick is further decorated with blue glass tiles in a mosaic brick pattern surrounding the top of the stick. The Favrile shade adorns a green pulled feather design and is accented and outlined in gold iridescence set against a slightly iridescent tan background. A similar candlestick is pictured in the book Tiffany Lamps and Metalware by Alastair Duncan, page 385, illustration 1561. PROVENANCE: From the Unreserved Estate of Lynda Cunningham.

Tiffany Studios New York Mosaic Candle Lamp

Decorated Vase by Louis Comfort Tiffany

A Tiffany Studios New York Favrile glass decorated vase by Louis Comfort Tiffany. This vase, with a green background, is decorated with red and white swirling forms. Provenance: Important Tiffany & Glass from the Minna Rosenblatt Gallery, Christie''s, New York, 10 December, 2003 A similar vase is featured in Exhibition catalogue, "Louis C. Tiffany: Meisterwerke des Amerikanischen Jugendstil", Museum für Kunst und Gewerbe Hamburg, 1999, p. 159 model variant illustrated.

Decorated Vase by Louis Comfort Tiffany

Bronze Humidor by Tiffany Studios New York

A patinated bronze humidor by Tiffany Studios New York with cedar lining and interior cover with bronze knob. The top edge of the humidor is decorated with stylized flowers. The body has textured bumps all around. The top of the humidor has a sculpted design reminiscent of a volcanic crater. Volcanos were a central leitmotif throughout Tiffany''s oeuvre. In 1870, a 22-year-old Tiffany and the eminent Hudson River School painter Robert Swain Gifford visited Pompeii. While excavations had begun well over a century earlier, they were still mostly incomplete. The city''s dramatic history and the looming reminder of Vesuvius''s destructive potential stirred the romantic passions of 19th-century painters. The volcano reprised itself in Tiffany Studios'' largest mosaic commission, the crystal curtain at Palacio de Bellas Artes in Mexico City. The mosaic depicted the everlasting snows of Popocatepetl and Ixtaccihuatl, the extinct volcanoes that look down upon the valley of that city. Flowers blanket the volcanoes. Similarly, in the "Volcano humidor," the top edge of the humidor is decorated with stylized flowers, perhaps evoking the renewal of life after a volcanic eruption. An identical humidor belongs to the collection of Edgar Kauffman, Jr. at Frank Lloyd Wright''s Fallingwater. Fallingwater was home to an exclusively Japanese and Japonisme collection. Kauffman chose the ... humidor for its Japanese- inspired metalwork and design. A similar humidor is pictured in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988, p. 450, plate 1793; and in: "Louis Comfort Tiffany at Tiffany & Co.," by John Loring, New York: Harry N. Abrams, Inc., 2002, p. 238, "Louis Comfort Tiffany: Treasures from the Driehaus Collection," by David A. Hanks, Richard H. Driehaus, Richard H. Driehaus Museum, The Monacelli Press, LLC, 2013, p. 164 fig. 55

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Bronze Humidor by Tiffany Studios New York

Tiffany Studios "Arrowhead" Jardinere

A Tiffany Studios New York patinated bronze "Arrowhead" jardiniere with favrile mosaic glass and a copper interior. The beautifully striated blue and green glass mosaic arranged in stark geometric patterning is elegantly juxtaposed in this stunning piece by the flowing natural forms executed in bronze. A similar jardinere is pictured in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988, p. 396, plate 1608.

Tiffany Studios 'Arrowhead' Jardinere

Byzantine Bowl by Louis Comfort Tiffany

A Tiffany Studios New York Favrile glass bowl with Byzantine decoration. This delicate translucent bowl is decorated in the colors of silver, gold and green. It sits on three gold-colored scroll-shaped glass feet. Favrile is the trade name Tiffany gave to his blown art glass. The name derives from the Latin word fabrilis, meaning "made by hand." The technique was developed at the Tiffany Glass and Decorating Company in the mid-1890s using filaments from batches of differently colored glass and working the material while the glass was still molten. Ornamentation was added before the piece had its final shape, so that the decoration became fully integrated into the vessel. The technique was used in both decorative vases and functional pieces such as tableware (bowls, goblets, carafes) and lamp shades. Tiffany intended the favrile designation as a guarantee to current customers and future collectors of the fine quality of these objects. A plaque with similar decorative motif is pictured in: Louis Comfort Tiffany and Laurelton Hall: An Artist''s Country Estate, by Alice Cooney Frelinghuysen, New York: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2006, p. 110.

Byzantine Bowl by Louis Comfort Tiffany

Tiffany Studios New York "Reactive Paperweight" Vase

An extremely rare and collectible Tiffany Studios New York "Leaf and Vine" Reactive Paperweight glass vase.The "leaf and vine" design was based upon the leaves of the bindweed vine. While closely related to the Tiffany''s beloved morning glory paperweights, Tiffany chose not to let the flowers of the bindweed distract from the intricate venation of the leaves. Employing the considerable technical acumen of his chemist Parker McIlhiney and the extraordinary technical skills of his main gaffer (or glass decorator), Leslie Nash, Tiffany experimented with every glass technique imaginable. In this vase, heat-sensitive ("reactive") glass was built up from a purple interior to an orange and green decorative motif of autumnal leaves and vines, finally encased in a transparent clear layer of glass, hence the "Paperweight" title. The remarkable thing about this vase is how the glass changes color in transmitted versus reflected light. Tiffany produced very few of these vases, none with such a brilliant color as in the present example, and all are distinguished by an "X" in the signature to reflect their "Experimental" nature.

Tiffany Studios New York 'Reactive Paperweight' Vase

Tiffany Studios "Millefiori" Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York monumental glass "Aquamarine" vase, featuring iridescent yellow, blue and brown marsh marigolds against an iridescent aquamarine ground. The vase''s featured flower, the marsh marigold (Caltha palustris), was a common spring wildflower that was often seen in the marshy areas on the grounds of Tiffany''s garden estate, Laurelton Hall. While the marsh marigold motif was previously used in Tiffany''s Metalwork and Enameling Department, what distinguished Tiffany''s aquamarine vases was the decision to view an above-ground flower through a lens of water. Like many of his fellow fin-de-siècle aesthetes, Tiffany frequently vacationed in the Bahamas, at Nassau, on New Providence Island. Inspired by the island''s lush marine and aquatic life, Tiffany sent Arthur Sanders, one of his gaffers, to tour the island in a glass-bottomed boat. Invented in 1878, the glass-bottomed boat consisted of two or three decks and almost no bottom, in place of which were great panes of glass or windows. No longer impeded by the water''s optically erratic surface, tourists could view the ocean''s bottom through the boat''s floor, similar to the view through a scuba diver''s mask. The glass-bottomed boat thereafter became a popular tourist attraction in many island locales. Tiffany encased his designs in thick layers of green glass to emulate the intimate view of the glass-botto ... med boat. The complex process of internal decoration meant few vases survived the vase''s cooling stage. The artistic value and technical difficulty of the Aquamarine vases were reflected in their high price of $300.

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Tiffany Studios 'Millefiori' Vase

Tiffany Studios New York American "Lava" Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York American Art Nouveau "Lava" vase A visit to Mount Etna in Sicily during one of its eruptions is said to have inspired Tiffany to capture in glass the force and beauty of the molten volcanic flows and basaltic rock formations that he observed there. The free-form abstract drippings of gold molten glass and the speckled blue and gold ground recreate the naturalistic effects of flowing lava and make this vase an exceptional example of the form. Provenance: The Garden Museum Collection, Matsue, Japan and Important Art Nouveau from the Private Collection of Lloyd & Barbara Macklowe at Sotheby''s 1995 This vase is pictured in: "A Selection of 300 Works From Louis C. Tiffany Garden Museum," by Takeo Horiuchi, Japan: Greco Corporation Fine Art Department, 2001, p. 250. A similar piece is also in the collection of the Chrysler Museum in Norfolk, VA: "The Tiffany Collection of the Chrysler Museum at Norfolk," by Paul E. Doros, Richmond, VA: W. M. Brown & son, Inc., 1978, p. 70, plate 69. Also pictured in "Tiffany Favrile Glass and the Quest of Beauty," by Martin Eidelberg, page 29, plate 28.

Tiffany Studios New York American 'Lava' Vase

Bronze "Lily Pad" Mirror by Tiffany Studios

A Tiffany Studios New York patinated bronze "Lily Pad" dressing mirror with a lily pad base and twisted vine frame. Pictured in "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: an illustrated reference to over 2000 models" by Alastair Duncan, page 402, plate 1633, #899.

Bronze 'Lily Pad' Mirror by Tiffany Studios

Tiffany Studios New York Glass and Bronze Gimbal Candlestick with Snuffer

A Tiffany Studios New York favrile and turtleback tile glass and patinated bronze gimbal candlestick with snuffer. The shade features green pulled feathers on a cream background. It sits above a round iridescent leaded turtleback glass ball. A similar piece is pictured in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antiques Collectors'' Club Ltd., p. 377, cat. 1544, #1208.

Tiffany Studios New York Glass and Bronze Gimbal Candlestick with Snuffer

Tiffany Studios "Cypriote" Miniature Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York glass "Cypriote" vase, featuring a mottled and multi-textured lava-like finish, with an uneven border. The vase has a dark background with iridescent green, blue, purple and metallic swirls. Cypriote is a textured glass achieved at Tiffany Glass and Decorating Company by rolling glass over a marble or iron surface covered with pulverized bits of the same glass. Its iridescence and bubbles resembled the decomposed surface of Roman glass discovered during archeological explorations on the island of Cyprus, hence its name. Lava glass evolved from Cypriote glass by using thicker, brighter glass and dripping golden glass irregularly over the surface. A similar vase is pictured in: "The Art of Glass: Art Nouveau to Art Deco" by Victor Arwas, London: Andreas Papadakis, 1996, p. 40, plate 50.

Tiffany Studios 'Cypriote' Miniature Vase

Tiffany Studios New York Glass and Bronze "Peacock" Mirror

A Tiffany Studios New York glass and bronze "Peacock" mirror, featuring a finely sculpted patinated bronze base decorated with stylized peacock feathers, accented with multi-colored Favrile glass mosaic tiles. The peacock feather was a favorite motif of Louis Comfort Tiffany. Pictured in: "Tiffany at Auction," by Alastair Duncan, p. 47, cat. no. 127, and in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware," by Alastair Duncan, page 402, plate # 1626.

Tiffany Studios New York Glass and Bronze 'Peacock' Mirror

Tiffany Studios New York "Tel el Amarna" Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York "Tel el Amarna" vase featuring iridescent brown, coffee and gold Favrile glass with an Egyptian-inspired motif. A vase with similar colors and decoration is pictured in: "Tiffany at Auction" by Alastair Duncan, New York: Rizzoli, 1981, p. 17, #19.

Tiffany Studios New York 'Tel el Amarna' Vase

Tiffany Studios New York Favrile Glass Floriform Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York Favrile glass floriform vase with a bulbous bowl and elongated internal spiral twisted stem. The vase features a white pulled leaf motif outlined in deep orange/red with a white feathered swirl decoration which is also duplicated on the foot. Favrile glass vases in the shapes of stylized flowers were among the earliest creations of the Tiffany Glass and Decorating Company, forerunner of Tiffany Studios. Initial examples of this technique date from approximately 1894, although later pieces show greater refinement. Flower forms have great variety in stem length and rim shape. A vase with a similar motif is pictured in: "Tiffany Favrile Glass and the Quest of Beauty" by Martin Eidelberg, New York: Lillian Nassau LLC, 2007, p. 43.

Tiffany Studios New York Favrile Glass Floriform Vase

Tiffany Wheel Carved Favrile Glass Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York wheel carved Favrile glass vase. The vase is globe shaped and features a band of red nasturtiums and green lily pads against an opalescent glass ground. A vase with similar motif is pictured in: "Louis Comfort Tiffany" by Jacob Baal-Teshuva, New York: Taschen, 2001, p. 287; and in: Alastair Duncan, "Louis C. Tiffany: The Garden Museum Collection", Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 2004, p. 245 (top left).

Tiffany Wheel Carved Favrile Glass Vase

Tiffany Studios New York Favrile Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York Favrile decorated vase. This vase features pulled copper decoration with iridescent gold trim against a golden ivory ground. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: "Louis C. Tiffany: Artist for the Ages" by Marilynn A. Johnson, London: Scala Publishers, Ltd., 2005, p. 229, cat. no. 131. Favrile is the trade name Tiffany gave to his blown art glass. The name derives from the Latin word fabrilis, meaning "made by hand." The technique was developed at Tiffany Furnaces in the mid-1890s using filaments from batches of differently colored glass and working the material while the glass was still molten. Ornamentation was added before the piece had its final shape, so that the decoration became fully integrated into the vessel. The technique was used in both decorative vases and functional pieces such as tableware (bowls, goblets, carafes) and lamp shades. Tiffany intended the favrile designation as a guarantee to current customers and future collectors of the fine quality of these objects.

Tiffany Studios New York  Favrile Vase

Tiffany Studios New York "Paperweight" Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York "Paperweight" glass vase, featuring yellow daffodils with red centers supported by green stems. The paperweight technique involved fusing thin rods of transparent glass in a variety of colors. The resulting thicker rod was cut into thin pieces that were then worked into clear glass. A similar vase is pictured in: "Louis Comfort Tiffany at Tiffany & Co." by John Loring, New York: Harry N. Abrams, Inc., 2002, page 158.

Tiffany Studios New York  'Paperweight' Vase

Tiffany Studios New York Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York favrile vase with pulled decoration. The vase has an iridescent background graduating from opalescent through yellow and pink to orange, with dark red swirls. Favrile is the trade name Tiffany gave to his blown art glass. The name derives from the Latin word fabrilis, meaning "made by hand." The technique was developed at Tiffany Furnaces in the mid-1890s using filaments from batches of differently colored glass and working the material while the glass was still molten. Ornamentation was added before the piece had its final shape, so that the decoration became fully integrated into the vessel. The technique was used in both decorative vases and functional pieces such as tableware (bowls, goblets, carafes) and lamp shades. Tiffany intended the favrile designation as a guarantee to current customers and future collectors of the fine quality of these objects.

Tiffany Studios New York Vase

Tiffany Studios New York Glass Vase

An early Tiffany Studios New York favrile glass vase with pulled decoration. The vase features iridescent swirls in pinks and blues on a translucent pale brown background. Favrile is the trade name Tiffany gave to his blown art glass. The name derives from the Latin word fabrilis, meaning "made by hand." The technique was developed at the Tiffany Glass and Decorating Company in the mid-1890s using filaments from batches of differently colored glass and working the material while the glass was still molten. Ornamentation was added before the piece had its final shape, so that the decoration became fully integrated into the vessel. The technique was used in both decorative vases and functional pieces such as tableware (bowls, goblets, carafes) and lamp shades. Tiffany intended the favrile designation as a guarantee to current customers and future collectors of the fine quality of these objects. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: "Louis C. Tiffany: Artist for the Ages" by Marilynn A. Johnson, London: Scala Publishers, Ltd., 2005, p. 228, cat. 130. Also in the collection of the Victorian Albert Museum, documented in "Louis C. Tiffany: The Collected Works of Robert Koch," Atglen, PA: Schiffer, 2001, page 316.

Tiffany Studios New York Glass Vase

"Flower Form" Glass Vase by Tiffany

An American Art Nouveau Favrile glass "Flower Form" vase by Tiffany Studios New York. The upper portion of the vase is ornamented with green pulled feather decoration, imitative of leaves, against a graduated iridescent gold and rose colored ground and sits atop a translucent green stem that extends upwards from an iridescent gold foot. Favrile is the trade name Tiffany gave to his blown art glass. The name derives from the Latin word fabrilis, meaning "made by hand." The technique was developed at Tiffany Furnaces in the mid-1890s using filaments from batches of differently colored glass and working the material while the glass was still molten. Ornamentation was added before the piece had its final shape, so that the decoration became fully integrated into the vessel. Favrile glass vases in the shapes of stylized flowers were among the earliest creations of the Tiffany Glass and Decorating Company, forerunner of Tiffany Studios. Initial examples of this technique date from approximately 1894, although later pieces show greater refinement. Flower forms have great variety in stem length and rim shape.

'Flower Form' Glass Vase by Tiffany

Tiffany Studios "Flower-Form" Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York "Flower-Form" vase, featuring a green pulled-feather decoration on a cream ground. The vase has a goblet top and applied foot. Favrile glass vases in the shapes of stylized flowers were among the earliest creations of the Tiffany Glass and Decorating Company, forerunner of Tiffany Studios. Initial examples of this technique date from approximately 1894, although later pieces show greater refinement. Flower forms have great variety in stem length and rim shape. A similar vase is pictured in: "Louis C. Tiffany: Rebel in Glass", by Robert Koch (in "Louis C. Tiffany: The Collected Works of Robert Koch," Atglen, PA: Schiffer Publishing Ltd., 2001, p. 94).

Tiffany Studios 'Flower-Form' Vase

Favrile "Paperweight" Tiffany Glass Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York favrile "paperweight" glass vase decorated with a band of white daisies with long green stems and enhanced with red accents. The paperweight technique involved fusing thin rods of transparent glass in a variety of colors. The resulting thicker rod was cut into thin pieces and were then worked into clear glass. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: "Louis C. Tiffany: The Collected Works of Robert Koch," Atglen, PA: Schiffer Publishing Ltd., 2001, p. 106.

Favrile 'Paperweight' Tiffany Glass Vase

Glass "Paperweight" Tiffany Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York favrile glass "paperweight" vase, depicting a band of white daisies with green leaves. The paperweight technique involved fusing thin rods of transparent glass in a variety of colors. The resulting thicker rod was cut into thin pieces and were then worked into clear glass. A similar vase is pictured in: "Louis Comfort Tiffany at Tiffany & Co.," by John Loring, New York: Harry N. Abrams, Inc., 2002, page 158.

Glass 'Paperweight' Tiffany Vase

Tiffany Studios New York "Nasturtium" Paperweight Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York "Nasturtium" Paperweight vase featuring purple nasturtium blossoms with green leaves set within a golden, translucent ground. Provenance: The Garden Museum Collection, Matsue, Japan. The paperweight technique involved fusing thin rods of transparent glass in a variety of colors. The resulting thicker rod was but into thin pieces and were then worked into clear glass. This vase is pictured in: "Louis C. Tiffany: The Garden Museum Collection," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 2004, p. 260.

Tiffany Studios New York 'Nasturtium' Paperweight Vase

Tiffany Studios New York Glass "Peacock" Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York Favrile glass "Peacock" vase with iridescent pulled decoration stylized to look like peacock feathers by Louis Comfort Tiffany. The peacock feather was a favorite motif of Louis Comfort Tiffany. Shown in Strut: The Peacock and Beauty in Art at the Hudson River Museum, October 11, 2014 to January 18, 2015. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: "Tiffany Favrile Glass and the Quest of Beauty," by Martin Eidelberg, New York: Lillian Nassau LLC, 2007, p. 46.

Tiffany Studios New York Glass 'Peacock' Vase

Tiffany Studios "Pine Needle" Picture Frame

A Tiffany Studios New York gilt bronze and Favrile glass picture frame in the "Pine Needle" pattern with an square center and beaded trim, mottled amber and opaque colored glass. A similar picture frame is pictured in: "Tiffany Desk Sets," by William R. Holland, Atglen, PA: Schiffer, 2008, p. 62, figure 2-42.

Tiffany Studios 'Pine Needle' Picture Frame

Tiffany Studios "Pine Needle" Picture Frame

A Tiffany Studios New York gilt bronze and Favrile glass picture frame in the "Pine Needle" pattern with a square center and beaded trim, mottled amber and opaque colored glass. A similar picture frame is pictured in: "Tiffany Desk Sets," by William R. Holland, Atglen, PA: Schiffer, 2008, p. 62, figure 2-42.

Tiffany Studios 'Pine Needle' Picture Frame

Tiffany Studios "Cypriote" Miniature Vase

An early and unusual Tiffany Favrile glass Cypriote vase. The rounded body of the vase is decorated near the tapered neck and near the foot with an iridescent swirling motif in richly saturated tones of gold and ochre, framing a series of central pointed oval "window" panels of textured "Cypriote" glass, resting on a small circular foot, signed on the underside. Cypriote is a textured glass achieved at Tiffany Glass and Decorating Company by rolling glass over a marble or iron surface covered with pulverized bits of the same glass. Its iridescence and bubbles resembled the decomposed surface of Roman glass discovered during archeological explorations on the island of Cyprus, hence its name. Lava glass evolved from Cypriote glass by using thicker, brighter glass and dripping golden glass irregularly over the surface. Tiffany created a unique numbering system for his artistic glass. Beginning in 1892, glassware was progressively signed 1-9999. The next series deployed an "A" as a prefix, making it easy to date this "E" prefix vase to 1896. Vases with prefixes of J, N and V have dates confirmed by international exhibitions, as do vases with suffixes of J and M. Vases from 1928, the last year of production were signed with a suffix "W". It appears that starting in 1906 each new year ushered in a new letter. While the diligence of the Tiffany Studios records cannot be veri ... fied due to a catastrophic fire that closed the factory in 1928, if one follows the logic of the numbering system it is possible that as many as 490,000 artistic vases were produced at the Tiffany Studios New York from 1892-1928. A similar vase is pictured in:" The Tiffany Collection of the Chrysler Museum at Norfolk," by Paul E. Doros, Richmond, VA: W. M. Brown & son, Inc., 1978, p. 59, cat. no. 57; and in: "Timeless Beauty: The Art of Louis Comfort Tiffany," Atglen, PA: Schiffer Publishing, 2016, p. 79.

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Tiffany Studios 'Cypriote' Miniature Vase

Tiffany Studios New York "Lava" Vase

An abstract figural "Lava" Favrile vase by Louis Comfort Tiffany. The cone shaped cylindrical vase features an upward spiral in gold metallic glass in high relief against a purplish-blue lava ground. Tiffany''s "Lava" glass was inspired by a trip to the Eastern Mediterranean, during which Tiffany visited Mount Etna in Sicily. The transformation of glass into volcanic "Lava" was achieved in the following manner: lustered glass was gathered on a blow pipe, rolled with chemical particles, and then worked in flame. The heat from the fire generated a reaction in which miniature basaltic-type craters and pitting formed on the surface of the glass, which was then coated with metallic lustered glass to create the purplish-blue ground imitative of lava. Next, free-form trails of glass were applied, each piece worked in a reduction flame (one starved of oxygen), and finally sprayed with metallic oxide. When a silvered finish fully developed it was sprayed with tin oxide and, depending on the artists, finished in blue, mauve, or gold tones. The production of Lava glass was the most risky of any Tiffany technique because it incorporated metallic oxides with different coefficients of expansion. When these were blended together during numerous high-temperature firings they created hazards for the annealing process that often flawed the pieces in their final moment of creation. The powerf ... ul form of the vase and the clean articulation of the different metallic finishes make this piece incredibly rare. A similar vase is pictured in: The Tiffany Collection of the Chrysler Museum at Norfolk, by Paul E. Doros, Richmond, VA: W. M. Brown & son, Inc., 1978, p. 53, cat. no. 64.

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Tiffany Studios New York 'Lava' Vase

Tiffany Studios "Marsh Marigold" Planter

A Tiffany Studios bronze "Marsh Marigold" planter, featuring a repeating pattern of marsh marigold leaves and vines around the gilt bronze base. The marsh marigold was included in one of the first four "Dragonfly" lamps made in April, 1899, entitled "Dragonfly and Water Flowers." The lamp was a collaboration between the female designers Clara Driscoll and Alice Carmen Gouvy. Gouvy, who would later design for the Metalwork and Enameling Department created this breathtaking naturalistic design. The planter has faint reddish enameling in the design to give the illusion of a fierce sunset peeking through a dense underbrush. The truly organic shape of the leaves featured is highlighted by the undulating modeling of their forms. Identical model planter pictured in "Louis C. Tiffany''s Glass - Bronzes - Lamps: A complete collector''s guide", by Robert Koch, page 224.

Tiffany Studios 'Marsh Marigold' Planter