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French Art Nouveau Gilt Bronze Clock by Dufrène

A French Art Nouveau clock in gilt bronze by Maurice Dufrène with dancing figures modeled by Félix Voulot for the Parisian atelier La Maison Moderne. A similar model of this clock is part of the permanent collection of the Museum fur Kunst und Gewerbe, Hamburg. Signed, "F. Voulot 1900". Pictured in The Paris Salons: 1895-1914, Volume V: Objects d''Art & Metalware, by Alastair Duncan, pages 38 and 227. Also pictured in L''Ofevrerie et Le Bronze, L''Art Decoratif, by Charles Torquet, page 207.

French Art Nouveau Gilt Bronze Clock by Dufrène

Louis Zorra Art Nouveau Diamond, Amethyst, Pearl and Plique-à-Jour Enamel Brooch

An Art Nouveau 18 karat gold and plique à jour brooch with diamond, amethysts and pearl by Louis Zorra. The brooch has an old mine-cut diamond with an approximate total weight of .65 carat, 21 round bezel-set amethysts with an approximate total weight of 1.10 carats, and a hanging, enamel-capped pearl. Similar pictured in "Imperishable Beauty Art Nouveau Jewelry", by Yvonne J. Markowitz and Elyse Zorn Karlin, "MFA Publications Museum of Fine Arts", Boston, 2008, pages 8 and 68. "Zorra was possibly born in Italy, working in Paris during the Art Nouveau period)...he moved to Paris from Asti, Italy, and exhibited at the Salon des artistes français, receiving an honorable mention in 1902." Markowitz and Karlin in Imperishable Beauty, pg. 151.

Louis Zorra Art Nouveau Diamond, Amethyst, Pearl and Plique-à-Jour Enamel Brooch

Okrant et Davidonniez Paris Art Deco Diamond and Platinum Wide Bracelet

A French Art Deco platinum bracelet with diamonds by Okrant et Davidonniez. The flexible open work bracelet has 512 European-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of 38.00 carats, 2 larger diamonds with an approximate total weight of 2.00 carats, and 2 smaller flanking diamonds with an approximate total weight of 1.00 carat, VS clarity, G/H/I color grade. With original box. The Okrant et Davidonniez workshop was located in Paris at 64 rue Lafayette. They produced jewelry for all the Place Vendôme fine jewelry houses, such as Van Cleef & Arpels, Cartier, Mauboussin, and Boucheron. The firm closed in 1939. Exhibited at "Anything Goes: The Jazz Age" at the Nassau County Museum of Art, 24 March 2018 - 8 July 2018. Similar bracelets are pictured in Art Deco Jewelry, by Sylvie Raulet, Rizzoli, 1984, page 84, 154.

Okrant et Davidonniez Paris Art Deco Diamond and Platinum Wide Bracelet

Kohn Art Deco Diamond, Ruby, Emerald and Lapis Lazuli Jardiniere Brooch

An Art Deco platinum and gold brooch with diamonds, ruby, emerald and lapis lazuli by Kohn. The brooch has 38 round-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of 1.20 carats, with ruby and emerald accents. The base of the jardiniere is formed of a single piece of lapis lazuli banded with red and black enamel. Exhibited at "Anything Goes: The Jazz Age" at the Nassau County Museum of Art, 24 March 2018 - 8 July 2018.

Kohn Art Deco Diamond, Ruby, Emerald and Lapis Lazuli Jardiniere Brooch

E. M. Gattle & Co. Art Deco Diamond and Platinum Brooch

An American Art Deco platinum brooch with diamonds by E. M. Gattle & Co.. The brooch has 168 old European-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of 4.50 carats, and 5 square-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of .75 carat. The total approximate diamond weight of the brooch is 5.25 carats, H/I color, VS clarity. The brooch centers on a dimensional jardinière flanked by pierced foliate elements with a milgrain set diamond border. E.M. Gattle Co. was founded by Emanuel Gattle in the latter part of the 19th century. Originally, E.M. Gattle & Co. was located on Broadway in the theatre district. In 1907, the company moved to the corner of 38th Street and Fifth Avenue and, later, to 55th Street and Fifth Avenue, next to the St. Regis Hotel. One of their notable customers was Enrico Caruso, who shopped Gattle stores for jewelry. However, he was not only a shopper of Gattle, he also allowed his name and photograph to be used in Gattle advertising. Gattle became successful until the time they closed their doors. The firm closed in 1940, a year before the outbreak of World War II. Exhibited at "Anything Goes: The Jazz Age" at the Nassau County Museum of Art, 24 March 2018 - 8 July 2018.

E. M. Gattle & Co. Art Deco Diamond and Platinum Brooch

Petite Coupe Sur in Enamel and Gold by Thesmar

Petite coupe sur talon in enamel and 18 karat gold by André Fernand Thesmar (1843–1912). In original box. André Fernand Thesmar (1843-1912) was a French enameler. He is credited with bringing the soft-paste porcelain back into style, alongside sections with gold foil backings, in the 20th century. He also used the method of plique-à-jour, including works that were often inspired by Japanese and Chinese enameling. He showed his work at the 1900 Paris Exposition Universelle. The floral motifs that adorn this petite coupe sur talon by André Thesmar appear to float due to the expert use of plique-à-jour, a type of enamel that has no backing so that light can shine through it like leaded glass. Thesmar''s ability to create such an exceptional piece in gold and enamel shows a combination of artistry and technical genius that is very rare to come by. A similar coupe sur talon is in the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.

Petite Coupe Sur in Enamel and Gold by Thesmar

French Pâte-de-Verre Dish by Amalric Walter

A French ''Lucanes, cerf-volant'' pâte de verre by Amalric Walter and Henri Bergé. This piece features two scarabs atop a raised mound at the center of the dish. The glass of the surrounding dish graduates from opaque fiery ochre to translucent gold. A similar dish is pictured in : Amalric Walter (1870-1959), by Keith Cummings, Kingswinford: Broadfield House Glass Museum, 2006, p. 24, plate 26.

French Pâte-de-Verre Dish by Amalric Walter

Marianne Ostier Mid-20th Century Diamond and Gold Earrings

A pair of 18 karat gold earrings with diamonds by Marianne Ostier. The earrings contain 32 round-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of 2.60 carats, G/H color, VS clarity. The earrings are composed of twisted gold wire forming a cone shape which is topped with a cluster of diamonds. "A Collection of Jewelry, Designed by Marianne Ostier Ostier, Inc., one of New York''s leading jewelers dealing precious-stone jewelry of original design and superb custom craftsmanship, was closed in September of this year [1969], following the death of its co-founder, Oliver Ostier. The present sale offers the entire stock of this distinguished firm. All pieces are original designs of Marianne Ostier, co-founder with her late husband of the firm and an internationally famed designer of jewelry. "Of the decision to close the business, Marianne Ostier said: With the passing of my husband, I have had to devote more and more of my efforts to administrative duties. These demands of my time can no longer be met without artistic compromise which to me is unacceptable. "Representing the third generation of court jewelers in Austria, Oliver Ostier came to America following the Anschluss of 1938. Shortly thereafter he founded the firm of Ostier, Inc., with his wife Marianne, a talented painter and sculptress as well as an artist in the design of jewelry. Author of Jewels and the woman , the ... basic primer of the art of wearing jewelry, Marianne Ostier''s designs became major jewelry fashions and classics of modern designed jewelry. She is responsible for numerous innovations, such as the pincushion clip, the famed skin pin and free-form jewelry; she pioneered in abstract designs for jewelry and, as a sculptress, brought a new dimension to her work in jewelry design. For many years, Mrs. Ostier won the Diamond U.S.A. Award and the Diamond International Award for design excellence. The first life-time member elected to the Diamonds-International Academy, the hall of fame for modern jewelry designers, she represented the United States at the Art in Precious Jewelry exhibition at the Finch College Museum of Art in 1966, which featured the work of the foremost designers of ten countries. Among the artists, in addition to Mrs. Ostier, were Georges Braques and Salvador Dali."

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Marianne Ostier Mid-20th Century Diamond and Gold Earrings

French Art Nouveau "Mimosa" Vase by Daum

An artistic French Art Nouveau mimosa vase by Daum featuring pink cameo overlay naturalistically modeled as a languid orchid. The influences of Japanese culture permeated fin de siècle Paris and could be felt in museums and in homes. Similarly, a nascent fascination with natural forms, found in publications of the day like Ernst Haeckle''s Kunstformen der Natur, manifested itself in a proliferation of flowers in French art and design and in an intense investigation of flora where artists rivaled botanists. This piece borders on abstraction. The orchid, splayed open and surrounded by copious pollen spores, is imbued with feminine sensuality. The imaginative color palate and curving lines surpass the glass design standards of the day and render this piece a beguiling objet d''art.

French Art Nouveau 'Mimosa' Vase by Daum

Art Nouveau pâte-de-verre tray by Bergé and Walter,

A French Art Nouveau glass pâte-de-verre tray designed by Henri Bergé and executed by Amalric Walter, featuring yellow, orange and green striations. The tray is adorned with an ocean scene featuring a blue/green crab atop seaweed. A similar tray is pictured in "Almaric Walter (1870-1959)" by Keith Cummings, Kingswinford (UK): Broadfield House Glass Museum, 2006, page 73 plate 113.

Art Nouveau pâte-de-verre tray by Bergé and Walter,

Tiffany Wheel Carved Favrile Glass Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York wheel carved Favrile glass vase. The vase is globe shaped and features a band of red nasturtiums and green lily pads against an opalescent glass ground. A vase with similar motif is pictured in: "Louis Comfort Tiffany" by Jacob Baal-Teshuva, New York: Taschen, 2001, p. 287; and in: Alastair Duncan, "Louis C. Tiffany: The Garden Museum Collection", Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 2004, p. 245 (top left).

Tiffany Wheel Carved Favrile Glass Vase

Tiffany Studios New York Glass Vase

An early Tiffany Studios New York favrile glass vase with pulled decoration. The vase features iridescent swirls in pinks and blues on a translucent pale brown background. Favrile is the trade name Tiffany gave to his blown art glass. The name derives from the Latin word fabrilis, meaning "made by hand." The technique was developed at the Tiffany Glass and Decorating Company in the mid-1890s using filaments from batches of differently colored glass and working the material while the glass was still molten. Ornamentation was added before the piece had its final shape, so that the decoration became fully integrated into the vessel. The technique was used in both decorative vases and functional pieces such as tableware (bowls, goblets, carafes) and lamp shades. Tiffany intended the favrile designation as a guarantee to current customers and future collectors of the fine quality of these objects. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: "Louis C. Tiffany: Artist for the Ages" by Marilynn A. Johnson, London: Scala Publishers, Ltd., 2005, p. 228, cat. 130. Also in the collection of the Victorian Albert Museum, documented in "Louis C. Tiffany: The Collected Works of Robert Koch," Atglen, PA: Schiffer, 2001, page 316.

Tiffany Studios New York Glass Vase

Tiffany Studios New York "Nasturtium" Paperweight Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York "Nasturtium" Paperweight vase featuring purple nasturtium blossoms with green leaves set within a golden, translucent ground. Provenance: The Garden Museum Collection, Matsue, Japan. The paperweight technique involved fusing thin rods of transparent glass in a variety of colors. The resulting thicker rod was but into thin pieces and were then worked into clear glass. This vase is pictured in: "Louis C. Tiffany: The Garden Museum Collection," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 2004, p. 260.

Tiffany Studios New York 'Nasturtium' Paperweight Vase

Tiffany Studios New York Glass "Peacock" Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York Favrile glass "Peacock" vase with iridescent pulled decoration stylized to look like peacock feathers by Louis Comfort Tiffany. The peacock feather was a favorite motif of Louis Comfort Tiffany. Shown in Strut: The Peacock and Beauty in Art at the Hudson River Museum, October 11, 2014 to January 18, 2015. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: "Tiffany Favrile Glass and the Quest of Beauty," by Martin Eidelberg, New York: Lillian Nassau LLC, 2007, p. 46.

Tiffany Studios New York Glass 'Peacock' Vase

Art Nouveau "Crabe" vide-poche by Amalric Walter

A French "Crabe" pâte de verre vide-poche by Amalric Walter. The reddish-brown crab has spots of dark green, red and yellow on the top portion of its shell. It sits on a green wave with long strands of seaweed. A similar vide-poche is pictured in: Amalric Walter (1870-1959), by Keith Cummings, Kingswinford: Broadfield House Glass Museum, 2006, p. 18, cat. no. 15.

Art Nouveau 'Crabe' vide-poche by Amalric Walter

French "Crabe" Pâte de Verre Vide Poche by Amalric Walter and Henri Bergé

A French "Crab" pâte de verre vide-poche by Amalric Walter and Henri Bergé. The reddish-brown crab, with spots of deep yellow and deep green on its back, sits atop a bed of kelp on an elongated green and yellow dish. A similar vide-poche is pictured in: Amalric Walter (1870-1959), by Keith Cummings, Kingswinford: Broadfield House Glass Museum, 2006, p. 25, cat. no .30.

French 'Crabe' Pâte de Verre Vide Poche by Amalric Walter and Henri Bergé

"Langouste", pâte de verre paperweight by Walter and Bergé.

A French "Langouste" pâte de verre paperweight by Amalric Walter and Henri Bergé. The brown crayfish with red spots straddles a green and yellow curved base. A similar paperweight is pictured in: Amalric Walter (1870-1959), by Keith Cummings, Kingswinford: Broadfield House Glass Museum, 2006, p. 49, cat. no 77c.

'Langouste', pâte de verre paperweight by Walter and Bergé.

Floral Vase by Tiffany Studios New York

A Favrile flower form vase by Louis Comfort Tiffany. The vase is iridescent yellow, with hints of orange, and has a ruffled rim. Favrile glass vases in the shapes of stylized flowers were among the earliest creations of the Tiffany Glass and Decorating Company, forerunner of Tiffany Studios. Initial examples of this technique date from approximately 1894, although later pieces show greater refinement. Flower forms have great variety in stem length and rim shape. A similar vase is pictured in: "Tiffany at Auction," by Alastair Duncan, New York: Rizzoli, 1981, p. 24, cat. no. 44; "The Tiffany Collection of the Chrysler Museum at Norfolk," by Paul E. Doros, Richmond, VA: W. M. Brown & son, Inc., 1978, p. 32, cat. no. 26; "Louis Comfort Tiffany," by Jacob Baal-Teshuva, New York: Taschen, 2001, p. 260; "The Art Glass of Louis Comfort Tiffany," by Paul E. Doros, New York: The Vendome Press, 2013, p. 74, fig. 27.

Floral Vase by Tiffany Studios New York

French Art Nouveau Dragonfly Table by Émile Gallé.

A French Art Nouveau two tiered table by Émile Gallé. The table''s four legs are the carved bodies of dragonflies, their wings outstretched and frozen mid-flight. The table top rests on the dragonflies'' heads and wings, with a fluid curvature in the corners creating a crown for the winged creatures'' heads. Marquetry on the table top depicts flowers on long-leafed stems, with shadows of foliage in the background. Decoration in darker tones and larger, starker motifs, decorate the lower tier, playing on the shadows in which it is naturally shrouded. The dragonfly works of Gallé''s provoked very strong critical reaction when they were debuted in 1900, with champions of Art Nouveau lauding the modernity of the dragonfly as caryatid, while detractors were horrified by the very idea of insects as table legs. Time has certainly found favor with this design, as it has found pride of place in museum collections worldwide. A similar table is pictured in: "Gallé Furniture," by Alastair Duncan and Georges de Bartha, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 2012, p. 207, plate 192a.

French Art Nouveau Dragonfly Table by Émile Gallé.

Loïe Fuller" Lithograph by Orazi

A French "Théâtre de Loïe Fuller" lithograph by Manuel Orazi. The poster depicts the dancer Loïe Fuller with flowing red hair and her signature billowing costume, surrounded by stylized flowers. Realistically-drawn flowers descend from the poster title. The artist''s insignia appears on the lower right of the image. A similar poster is pictured in:" Loïe Fuller: Magician of Light," Exhibition at the Virginia Museum, March 12-April 22, 1979, Richmond: The Virginia Museum, 1979, p. 76; and in: "The Kogod Collection," E. Greenwich, RI: Meridian Printing, 2004, p. 242.

 Loïe Fuller' Lithograph by Orazi

Tiffany Studios New York Glass "Gooseneck" Sprinkler Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York Favrile glass rose water sprinkler vase. The graceful vase is made of iridescent gold glass. The "gooseneck" design is considered one of Tiffany''s most original and delicate forms, inspired by Persian rosewater sprinklers. Tiffany first became familiar with the rosewater sprinkler through his early mentorship by Edward C. Moore of Tiffany and Company. Moore was a dedicated collector of Oriental art and a significant influence on Tiffany''s aesthetic. Moore''s 16th-century Persian rosewater sprinkler is now on view at the Metrpolitan Museum of Art. According to folklore, Persian rosewater sprinklers were used as "containers for tears." The vessel, named ashkdan, was meant to collect the sorrows of wives separated from their husbands. The story goes that a husband who had to go away for a prolonged period on business, war, or pilgrimage to Mecca gave an ashkdan to his wife so that she could weep into it during his absence and consequently prove how unhappy she had been without him. Tiffany promoted his rosewater sprinklers by using them as props in his infamous Egyptian Fete. An Egyptian slave girl, played by Tiffany''s friend Ethel Whitman, sprinkled rosewater to herald the entrance of Cleopatra. A similar sprinkler is pictured in: "Tiffany Favrile Art Glass," by Moise S. Steeg, Jr., Atglen, PA: Schiffer Publishing, Ltd., 1997, p. 33; and in: "Tiffany at Auction," by Alastair Duncan, New York: Rizzoli, 1981, p. 19, cat. no. 27.

Tiffany Studios New York Glass 'Gooseneck' Sprinkler Vase

Tiffany Studios New York American "Lava" Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York American Art Nouveau "Lava" vase A visit to Mount Etna in Sicily during one of its eruptions is said to have inspired Tiffany to capture in glass the force and beauty of the molten volcanic flows and basaltic rock formations that he observed there. The free-form abstract drippings of gold molten glass and the speckled blue and gold ground recreate the naturalistic effects of flowing lava and make this vase an exceptional example of the form. Provenance: The Garden Museum Collection, Matsue, Japan and Important Art Nouveau from the Private Collection of Lloyd & Barbara Macklowe at Sotheby''s 1995 This vase is pictured in: "A Selection of 300 Works From Louis C. Tiffany Garden Museum," by Takeo Horiuchi, Japan: Greco Corporation Fine Art Department, 2001, p. 250. A similar piece is also in the collection of the Chrysler Museum in Norfolk, VA: "The Tiffany Collection of the Chrysler Museum at Norfolk," by Paul E. Doros, Richmond, VA: W. M. Brown & son, Inc., 1978, p. 70, plate 69. Also pictured in "Tiffany Favrile Glass and the Quest of Beauty," by Martin Eidelberg, page 29, plate 28.

Tiffany Studios New York American 'Lava' Vase

Tiffany Studios Scarab and Mosaic Box

A Tiffany Studios New York "Scarab" mosaic and gilt bronze covered box. This round box is decorated with vivid mosaics of red, yellow, orange, green, turquoise blue and black. The cover has three applied favrile glass scarab beetles. The scarabs confirm Tiffany''s fascination for Egyptian archeological discoveries and are a fine expression of his inspiration. Louis Comfort Tiffany first traveled to Egypt in 1872, two years after the opening of the Suez Canal and near the height of the ensuing American "Eyptomania." Tiffany was immediately taken with the ancient cultural legacies and starkly exotic landscape of 19th Century Egypt, and upon his return to New York he devoted himself to the rendering of several large scale oil paintings depicting the landscape, ancient wonders and then modern architecture of Cairo and the surrounding area. From that point onward the aesthetic language of ancient Egypt was never far from Tiffany''s mind, and it would appear in various motif forms in various works for the rest of his artistic career. Those works that demonstrate Tiffany''s great passion and careful study of ancient Egypt are now considered among the rarest and most collectible of his oeuvre. After a second Nile River Cruise in 1908 Tiffany resolved to celebrate his long enchantment with all things Egyptian with a Fete that would be written about for decades to come. Invitatio ... ns to the strictly Egyptian-themed evening were on aged parchment in both hieroglyphs and English, and hand delivered to each of the bash''s 400 guests. Each of the attendees had to submit their costumes to astrict guidelines of authenticity overseen by a committee comprised of Egyptologists and authorities on costume art. Egyptian-inspired music, composed by Theodore Steinway, was performed by the New York Philharmonic Orchestra as Pedro de Cordoba, playing Marc Antony, brought gifts of Favrile glass to a posing Cleopatra. Tiffany''s sons-in-law were dressed as Roman lictors, while his daughters were adorned with rare scarab objects from Tiffany''s personal collection, fashioned as jewelry. Robert De Forest, the famed president of the Metropolitan Museum of American Art, arrived as the one of the Maharajas of Punjab; John D. Rockefeller attended dressed as a pharaoh and Egyptian beauty queens wearing gigantic scarab wings served them North African fare. Tiffany spared no detail and no expense to recreate the opulence of ancient Egyptian courts, and created many decorative arts especially for the occasion. Tiffany was particularly interested in the importance of the scarab beetle in Egyptian mythology, and sparingly employed decorative depictions of the insect in his works, most probably due to his understanding of the supreme and sacred nature of the motif. However, those works that did include scarabs executed in the ancient Egyptian style are considered of special personal importance to Tiffany, and are especially important to find in Tiffany collections. The Egyptian name for the beetle is derived from the verb "to be created" or "to come into the world." The Egyptians considered the beetle to be the incarnation of the creator god, who had regenerated himself cyclically. The beetle was thus understood as a potent symbol of rebirth, and was tied to understandings of the daily rising sun. A similar mosaic box is pictured in: Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models, by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988 p. 433, plate 1716; and in: Louis C. Tiffany: The Garden Museum Collection, by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 2004, p. 370.

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Tiffany Studios Scarab and Mosaic Box

Tiffany Studios New York Favrile Sprinkler Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York decorated Favrile glass rose water sprinkler vase. The vase is iridescent gold, with undertones of pink and blue. This "gooseneck" design is considered one of Tiffany''s most original and delicate forms, with a molded peacock feather decoration that circles the bulbous portion of the vase and continues along the mouth until fading in the neck. The "gooseneck" design is considered one of Tiffany''s most original and delicate forms, inspired by Persian rosewater sprinklers. Tiffany first became familiar with the rosewater sprinkler through his early mentorship by Edward C. Moore of Tiffany and Company. Moore was a dedicated collector of Oriental art and a significant influence on Tiffany''s aesthetic. Moore''s 16th-century Persian rosewater sprinkler is now on view at the Metrpolitan Museum of Art. According to folklore, Persian rosewater sprinklers were used as "containers for tears." The vessel, named ashkdan, was meant to collect the sorrows of wives separated from their husbands. The story goes that a husband who had to go away for a prolonged period on business, war, or pilgrimage to Mecca gave an ashkdan to his wife so that she could weep into it during his absence and consequently prove how unhappy she had been without him. Tiffany promoted his rosewater sprinklers by using them as props in his infamous Egyptian Fete. An Egyptian slave girl, ... played by Tiffany''s friend Ethel Whitman, sprinkled rosewater to herald the entrance of Cleopatra. A similar sprinkler is pictured in: "Tiffany Favrile Art Glass", by Moise S. Steeg, Jr., Atglen, PA: Schiffer Publishing, Ltd., 1997, p. 33.

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Tiffany Studios New York Favrile Sprinkler Vase

Walter and Bergé Pâte de Verre Lizards Tray

A French Art Nouveau pâte de verre tray by Amalric Walter. This tray is decorated with a spotted green lizard lying on the outer rim of the yellow dish. A similar dish is pictured in: Amalric Walter (1870-1959), by Keith Cummings, Kingswinford: Broadfield House Glass Museum, 2006, p. 19, plate 16.

Walter and  Bergé  Pâte de Verre Lizards Tray

Art Nouveau Paperweight crab by Amalric Walter

A French Art Nouveau "Crabe" pâte de verre paperweight by Amalric Walter and Henri Bergé, decorated with a relief of a reddish-brown crab poised upon a bright contrast of green and yellow algae. A similar paperweight is pictured in: Amalric Walter (1870-1959), by Keith Cummings, Kingswinford: Broadfield House Glass Museum, 2006, p. 43, cat. no. 63b.

Art Nouveau Paperweight crab by Amalric Walter

Tiffany Studios New York Enamel Box

A Tiffany Studios New York "Olive" covered box by, executed by the Enamelware Department of Stonebridge Glass Company, New York. This fabulous masterpiece is composed of enameled copper. The cover is decorated with olives, purple-brown copper branches and deep green leaves. From Paul Doros: "This enameled covered box clearly reveals the quality and innovative artistry that led to the company winning a gold medal at that world''s fair. It is of a familiar form but features an unusual motif and palette. Both the cover and slightly ribbed body have a repoussé design of ripening olives and pendant leaves on sinuous branches, one of them forming an irregular sculptural handle. The gold background is particularly noteworthy. Most Tiffany enamels of this type have a ground in shades of either red or blue. The background used in this object is perfectly suited, as it suggests olives ripening under a warm, golden sun. Hints of gold glimmer and sparkle through the slightly iridescent aubergine and purple olives, as well as the green leaves, adding to the illusion. It was pieces such as this one that caused contemporary critics to proclaim Tiffany''s enamels as "rare works of art" as well as "visions of delight." Paul Doros is former curator of glass at the Chrysler Museum of Art (Norfolk, Virginia) and author of The Art Glass of Louis Comfort Tiffany (New York: Vendome Press) ... , 2013. PROVENANCE Parke-Bernet Galleries Inc., New York Private Collection, New York, circa 1965 Thence by descent to the present owners LITERATURE Martin Eidelberg and Nancy McClelland, "Behind the Scenes of Tiffany Glassmaking: The Nash Notebooks," New York, 2001, pp. 21 and 178 (for the model executed in pottery) Alastair Duncan, "Louis C. Tiffany: The Garden Museum Collection," Woodbridge, Suffolk, 2004, pp. 466 (for the model executed in pottery) and 471 (for the model executed in bronze pottery)

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Tiffany Studios New York Enamel Box

French Art Nouveau Pâte-de-Verre Vide-Poche by Walter

A French "Chameleon" pâte de verre vide-poche by Amalric Walter. This piece features an intricately textured green chameleon sitting on the edge of a yellow and orange dish. A similar vide-poche is pictured in: Amalric Walter (1870-1959), by Keith Cummings, Kingswinford: Broadfield House Glass Museum, 2006, p. 23, cat. no. 24.

French Art Nouveau Pâte-de-Verre Vide-Poche by Walter

French Art Nouveau Patinated Bronze Sculpture by Sarah Bernhardt

A French Art Nouveau patinated bronze sculpture by Sarah Bernhardt. This sculpture is known to be a self-portrait with a chimera personification. The Chimera was, according to Greek mythology, a monstrous fire-breathing hybrid creature of Lycia in Asia Minor, composed of the parts of more than one animal. The term chimera has come to describe any mythical or fictional animal with parts taken from various animals, or to describe anything composed of very disparate parts, or perceived as wildly imaginative, implausible, or dazzling. This work has be accessioned into the permanent collections of The Museum of Fine Art Boston, The Virginia Museum of Fine Art and the Princeton Museum. There was also a sculpture given by the artist to King Edward VII and Queen Alexandra, and it remains in the Royal Collection Trust.

French Art Nouveau Patinated Bronze Sculpture by Sarah Bernhardt

"Langouste," pâte de verre vide-poche by Walter and Bergé.

A French Art Nouveau pâte de verre vide-poche by Amalric Walter and Henri Bergé. This piece features a brown "Langouste" resting on a blue-green shaped dish. A similar vide-poche is pictured in: Amalric Walter (1870-1959), by Keith Cummings, Kingswinford: Broadfield House Glass Museum, 2006, p. 24, cat. no. 28b.

'Langouste,' pâte de verre vide-poche by Walter and Bergé.

Decorated Vase by Louis Comfort Tiffany

A Tiffany Studios New York Favrile glass decorated vase by Louis Comfort Tiffany. This vase, with a green background, is decorated with red and white swirling forms. Provenance: Important Tiffany & Glass from the Minna Rosenblatt Gallery, Christie''s, New York, 10 December, 2003 A similar vase is featured in Exhibition catalogue, "Louis C. Tiffany: Meisterwerke des Amerikanischen Jugendstil", Museum für Kunst und Gewerbe Hamburg, 1999, p. 159 model variant illustrated.

Decorated Vase by Louis Comfort Tiffany

Tiffany Studios "Cypriote" Miniature Vase

An early and unusual Tiffany Favrile glass Cypriote vase. The rounded body of the vase is decorated near the tapered neck and near the foot with an iridescent swirling motif in richly saturated tones of gold and ochre, framing a series of central pointed oval "window" panels of textured "Cypriote" glass, resting on a small circular foot, signed on the underside. Cypriote is a textured glass achieved at Tiffany Glass and Decorating Company by rolling glass over a marble or iron surface covered with pulverized bits of the same glass. Its iridescence and bubbles resembled the decomposed surface of Roman glass discovered during archeological explorations on the island of Cyprus, hence its name. Lava glass evolved from Cypriote glass by using thicker, brighter glass and dripping golden glass irregularly over the surface. Tiffany created a unique numbering system for his artistic glass. Beginning in 1892, glassware was progressively signed 1-9999. The next series deployed an "A" as a prefix, making it easy to date this "E" prefix vase to 1896. Vases with prefixes of J, N and V have dates confirmed by international exhibitions, as do vases with suffixes of J and M. Vases from 1928, the last year of production were signed with a suffix "W". It appears that starting in 1906 each new year ushered in a new letter. While the diligence of the Tiffany Studios records cannot be veri ... fied due to a catastrophic fire that closed the factory in 1928, if one follows the logic of the numbering system it is possible that as many as 490,000 artistic vases were produced at the Tiffany Studios New York from 1892-1928. A similar vase is pictured in:" The Tiffany Collection of the Chrysler Museum at Norfolk," by Paul E. Doros, Richmond, VA: W. M. Brown & son, Inc., 1978, p. 59, cat. no. 57; and in: "Timeless Beauty: The Art of Louis Comfort Tiffany," Atglen, PA: Schiffer Publishing, 2016, p. 79.

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Tiffany Studios 'Cypriote' Miniature Vase

Bronze Humidor by Tiffany Studios New York

A patinated bronze humidor by Tiffany Studios New York with cedar lining and interior cover with bronze knob. The top edge of the humidor is decorated with stylized flowers. The body has textured bumps all around. The top of the humidor has a sculpted design reminiscent of a volcanic crater. Volcanos were a central leitmotif throughout Tiffany''s oeuvre. In 1870, a 22-year-old Tiffany and the eminent Hudson River School painter Robert Swain Gifford visited Pompeii. While excavations had begun well over a century earlier, they were still mostly incomplete. The city''s dramatic history and the looming reminder of Vesuvius''s destructive potential stirred the romantic passions of 19th-century painters. The volcano reprised itself in Tiffany Studios'' largest mosaic commission, the crystal curtain at Palacio de Bellas Artes in Mexico City. The mosaic depicted the everlasting snows of Popocatepetl and Ixtaccihuatl, the extinct volcanoes that look down upon the valley of that city. Flowers blanket the volcanoes. Similarly, in the "Volcano humidor," the top edge of the humidor is decorated with stylized flowers, perhaps evoking the renewal of life after a volcanic eruption. An identical humidor belongs to the collection of Edgar Kauffman, Jr. at Frank Lloyd Wright''s Fallingwater. Fallingwater was home to an exclusively Japanese and Japonisme collection. Kauffman chose the ... humidor for its Japanese- inspired metalwork and design. A similar humidor is pictured in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988, p. 450, plate 1793; and in: "Louis Comfort Tiffany at Tiffany & Co.," by John Loring, New York: Harry N. Abrams, Inc., 2002, p. 238, "Louis Comfort Tiffany: Treasures from the Driehaus Collection," by David A. Hanks, Richard H. Driehaus, Richard H. Driehaus Museum, The Monacelli Press, LLC, 2013, p. 164 fig. 55

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Bronze Humidor by Tiffany Studios New York

Art Nouveau "Crabe" Vide Poche by Amalric Walter

A French Art Deco pâte de verre vide poche by Amalric Walter and Henri Bergé. The tray features a black and brown crab with yellow highlights against a blue and yellow mottled background. The hexagonal form and radiating lines out of the crab''s back plant this piece firmly in the Art Deco aesthetic of geometry and symmetry. A similar dish is pictured in: "Amalric Walter (1870-1959)", by Keith Cummings, Kingswinford: Broadfield House Glass Museum, 2006, p. 18, plate 13.

Art Nouveau 'Crabe' Vide Poche by Amalric Walter

"Langouste", pâte de verre paperweight by Walter and Bergé.

A French Art Nouveau pâte de verre paperweight (presse papiers) by Amalric Walter and Henri Bergé. The paperweight has a brown "Langouste" resting on a sculpted pâte de verre base. There is great detail in the claws and the sections of the tail. A similar paperweight is pictured in: Amalric Walter (1870-1959), by Keith Cummings, Kingswinford: Broadfield House Glass Museum, 2006, p. 49, cat. no. 77c.

'Langouste', pâte de verre paperweight by Walter and Bergé.

Art Deco Platinum, Diamond, and Enamel Jabot Pin

A French Art Deco platinum, diamond and enamel jabot pin designed in a floral motif with flowers at each end, set with 100 old European-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of 2.90 carats, and black enamel forming the two flowers. This type of brooch, usually long and vertically shaped, consists of a single central pin with two decorative ornaments at either end. The lower ornament, which either clicks or screws into place, is detachable, allowing the connecting pin to be slipped through the garment. When fastened, the pin is invisible, so the two ornaments seem to float on the fabric. In the 1920''s and 1930''s, Cartier was famed for its jeweled jabots, which it called cliquet pins or brooches (named for the "click" made when the detachable ornament is snapped on to the pin). Exhibited at "Anything Goes: The Jazz Age" at the Nassau County Museum of Art, 24 March 2018 - 8 July 2018.

Art Deco Platinum, Diamond, and Enamel Jabot Pin

Tiffany & Co. Art Deco Diamond, Ruby, Emerald and Platinum Watch/Brooch

An American Art Deco platinum and enamel watch/brooch with diamonds, rubies and emeralds by Tiffany & Co. The watch/brooch has 215 round-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of 4.65 carats, and 14 baguette diamonds with an approximate total weight of 1.00 carat, 20 square-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of .90 carat, 6 cabochon rubies and 1 carved bead ruby with an approximate total weight of .52 carat and 11 cabochon and calibre-cut emeralds with an approximate total weight of .33 carat. "The style for decorative arts of the 1920''s was streamlined; form was reduced to basic geometry and the color palette was made strong and bold as opposed to the delicate pastels that were fashionable in the decades before the war. This trend became solidly established at the 1925 Paris Exposition des Arts Décoratifs, Industriels et Modernes, where visitors were electrified by the explosion of contrasting primary colors, geometric pattern and stylized natural subjects that burst on the scene," Falino and Markowitz. Similar pictured and discussed in American Luxury Jewels from the House of Tiffany, by Falino and Markowitz, editors, Antique Collectors'' Club, 2009, page 144, Plate 91. Exhibited at "Anything Goes: The Jazz Age" at the Nassau County Museum of Art, 24 March 2018 - 8 July 2018.

Tiffany & Co. Art Deco Diamond, Ruby, Emerald and Platinum Watch/Brooch

French Art Nouveau Pâte-de-Verre Paperweight by Walter

A French Art Nouveau pâte-de-verre paperweight by Almaric Walter and Henri Bergé featuring an intricately textured blue and green chameleon sitting on a rock. A similar paperweight is pictured in Amalric Walter (1870-1959), by Keith Cummings, Kingswinford: Broadfield House Glass Museum, 2006, p. 19, cat. no. 16c.

French Art Nouveau Pâte-de-Verre Paperweight by Walter

"Langouste", Pâte de Verre Paperweight by Walter and Bergé.

A French Art Nouveau pâte de verre by Amalric Walter and Henri Bergé. The paperweight has a brown "Langouste" resting on a sculpted pâte de verre base. There is great detail in the claws and the sections of the tails. A similar paperweight is pictured in: Amalric Walter (1870-1959), by Keith Cummings, Kingswinford: Broadfield House Glass Museum, 2006, p. 49, cat. no. 77c.

'Langouste', Pâte de Verre Paperweight by Walter and Bergé.

Byzantine Bowl by Louis Comfort Tiffany

A Tiffany Studios New York Favrile glass bowl with Byzantine decoration. This delicate translucent bowl is decorated in the colors of silver, gold and green. It sits on three gold-colored scroll-shaped glass feet. Favrile is the trade name Tiffany gave to his blown art glass. The name derives from the Latin word fabrilis, meaning "made by hand." The technique was developed at the Tiffany Glass and Decorating Company in the mid-1890s using filaments from batches of differently colored glass and working the material while the glass was still molten. Ornamentation was added before the piece had its final shape, so that the decoration became fully integrated into the vessel. The technique was used in both decorative vases and functional pieces such as tableware (bowls, goblets, carafes) and lamp shades. Tiffany intended the favrile designation as a guarantee to current customers and future collectors of the fine quality of these objects. A plaque with similar decorative motif is pictured in: Louis Comfort Tiffany and Laurelton Hall: An Artist''s Country Estate, by Alice Cooney Frelinghuysen, New York: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2006, p. 110.

Byzantine Bowl by Louis Comfort Tiffany

French Floriform Candlesticks by Paul Follot

A pair of French Art Nouveau silvered metal floriform candlesticks by Paul Follot. Follot was one of the main artists represented by "La Maison Moderne," a Parisian gallery that championed the avant-garde artists of the day. Follot was one of the few French artists to achieve success in both the Art Nouveau and Art Deco periods, and his work can be found in museum collections worldwide. Similar candlesticks are pictured in: "The Paris Salons 1895-1915, Vol. V: Objects d''Art and Metalware", by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1999, p. 263.

French Floriform Candlesticks by Paul Follot

French Art Nouveau Gilt Bronze Lighted Sculpture of Loie Fuller by Raoul Larche

A French Art Nouveau gilt bronze lighted sculpture, "Loïe Fuller," designed and sculpted by François-Raoul Larche. This is the most famous of all bronzes to be made in the Art Nouveau aesthetic, representing the famous American dancer and choreographer, Loïe Fuller performing one of her dances. Her flowing robes and fabrics conceal two light bulbs. This sculpture has been the subject of numerous museum exhibitions, most notably at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts and the Villa Stuck Museum in Germany.

French Art Nouveau Gilt Bronze Lighted Sculpture of Loie Fuller by Raoul Larche

Paul Follot Coffee and Tea Service

A rare and important French Art Nouveau silvered metal coffee and tea service by Paul Follot. The set includes a tray, tea and a coffee pots, and containers for sugar and cream. The set is decorated with whiplash curves, fabric-like folds and a spray of monnaie du pape ("the Pope''s money") leaves. This set was manufactured by Metallwarren Fabrik, F.w. Quist, Esslingen, Germany. All five pieces are signed "Follot". The service was exhibited at the Salon Décorateurs in 1904. The model is in the Musée d''Orsay, the Victoria and Albert Museum, and the Brohan Museum (Berlin). In the year 2000, an identical set was exhibited in Art Nouveau 1890-1914 at the Victoria & Albert Museum and the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC. Provenance: Purchased in Wiesbaden, Germany from a prominent lady who is now in her late sixties. This tea service, with its original box, was her mother''s wedding gift. Similar set pictured in: "Art Nouveau: The French Aesthetic," by Victor Arwas, p. 393 Art Nouveau Belgium France, by Yvonne Brunhammer, p. 206, pl. 306 "Art Nouveau: 1890-1914," by Paul Greenhalgh, p. 234, pl. 14.13. "The French Decorative Arts, the Societé des Artistes Décorateurs 1900-1942," by Cf. Y. Brunhammer + S. Tise, Paris 1990, p. 16-17. "Art Nouveau," by Judith Miller, page 180. Dimensions: 16¾" wide x 24¼" long (tray)

Paul Follot Coffee and Tea Service

French Art Nouveau Gilt Bronze Clock by Dufrène

A French Art Nouveau clock in green and brown patinated bronze, by Maurice Dufrène. The clock has dancing figures of a man and a woman, modeled by Félix Voulot for the Parisian atelier La Maison Moderne. A similar model of this clock is part of the permanent collection of the Museum fur Kunst und Gewerbe, Hamburg. Signed, "F. Voulot 1900". Pictured in The Paris Salons: 1895-1914, Volume V: Objects d''Art & Metalware, by Alastair Duncan, pages 38 and 227. Also pictured in L''Ofevrerie et Le Bronze, L''Art Decoratif By Charles Torquet, page 207.

French Art Nouveau Gilt Bronze Clock by Dufrène

Tiffany Studios New York "Lava" Vase

An abstract figural "Lava" Favrile vase by Louis Comfort Tiffany. The cone shaped cylindrical vase features an upward spiral in gold metallic glass in high relief against a purplish-blue lava ground. Tiffany''s "Lava" glass was inspired by a trip to the Eastern Mediterranean, during which Tiffany visited Mount Etna in Sicily. The transformation of glass into volcanic "Lava" was achieved in the following manner: lustered glass was gathered on a blow pipe, rolled with chemical particles, and then worked in flame. The heat from the fire generated a reaction in which miniature basaltic-type craters and pitting formed on the surface of the glass, which was then coated with metallic lustered glass to create the purplish-blue ground imitative of lava. Next, free-form trails of glass were applied, each piece worked in a reduction flame (one starved of oxygen), and finally sprayed with metallic oxide. When a silvered finish fully developed it was sprayed with tin oxide and, depending on the artists, finished in blue, mauve, or gold tones. The production of Lava glass was the most risky of any Tiffany technique because it incorporated metallic oxides with different coefficients of expansion. When these were blended together during numerous high-temperature firings they created hazards for the annealing process that often flawed the pieces in their final moment of creation. The powerf ... ul form of the vase and the clean articulation of the different metallic finishes make this piece incredibly rare. A similar vase is pictured in: The Tiffany Collection of the Chrysler Museum at Norfolk, by Paul E. Doros, Richmond, VA: W. M. Brown & son, Inc., 1978, p. 53, cat. no. 64.

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Tiffany Studios New York 'Lava' Vase

French Art Nouveau Table by Majorelle

A French Art Nouveau mahogany salon table with fruitwood marquetry by Louis Majorelle. The table top is decorated with leaves and vines. The legs have carved flowers. Provenance Property from the Geyer Collection Louis C. Tiffany Garden Museum Collection, Matsue, Japan Sotheby''s Paris, Chefs-d''Ouevre Art Nouveau, Ancienne Collection du Garden Museum, Japon, February 16, 2013, lot 57 Acquired from the above by the present owner Literature Alastair Duncan, "Louis C. Tiffany: The Garden Museum Collection," Woodbridge, Suffolk, 2004, p. 619 (for related examples from the Garden Museum Collection)

French Art Nouveau Table by Majorelle