View by page         View All
Search Results for

"glass lamp"

Related Articles

Art Nouveau Bronze and Favrile Glass Table Candelabrum by Tiffany.

An American Art Nouveau bronze and favrile glass mounted table candelabrum by Tiffany Studios New York. The candelabrum has six arms. Each candle holder is decorated with green favrile jewels. A similar candelabrum is pictured in: Alastair Duncan, "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models", Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club Ltd., 2007, p. 385, plate 1571.

Art Nouveau Bronze and Favrile Glass Table Candelabrum by Tiffany.

Tiffany Studios New York "Five-Light Lily" Wall Sconces

A pair of Tiffany Studios New York patinated bronze and favrile glass "Five-Light Lily" sconces. Similar sconces are pictured in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988, p. 351, plate 1454.

Tiffany Studios New York 'Five-Light Lily' Wall Sconces

Gallé Lamp – Celebration of Spring

An Art Nouveau cameo glass and Vienna Faience glazed figural lamp by Emile Gallé and Podany. The porcelain base is formed from three dancing women with outstretched arms holding a garland of pink roses. The blossoms echo the elegant dome-shaped rosy-hued shade. Both the inside and the outside of the shade are decorated with pink and green flowers in carved relief.

Gallé Lamp – Celebration of Spring

Tiffany Studios New York Glass and Bronze "Peacock" Mirror

A Tiffany Studios New York glass and bronze "Peacock" mirror, featuring a finely sculpted patinated bronze base decorated with stylized peacock feathers, accented with multi-colored Favrile glass mosaic tiles. The peacock feather was a favorite motif of Louis Comfort Tiffany. Pictured in: "Tiffany at Auction," by Alastair Duncan, p. 47, cat. no. 127, and in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware," by Alastair Duncan, page 402, plate # 1626.

Tiffany Studios New York Glass and Bronze 'Peacock' Mirror

Tiffany Studios New York Favrile Glass Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York Favrile glass vase with iridescent pulled decoration in the style of a Hopi vase. Louis Comfort Tiffany had more than five hundred Native North American objects, including baskets, implements, and articles of clothing from the Pacific Nothwest on display at his home in Laurelton Hall. Many of these objects were on view in a special oblong room that had once been a bowling alley. Baskets, pottery, and textiles also served as decorative accents throughout the house. This vase pays tribute to Tiffany''s collection. In its color, shape, and decoration it resembles a work of Native American Hopi pottery and shows the influence of this art form on Tiffany''s own work. Favrile is the trade name Tiffany gave to his blown art glass. The name derives from the Latin word fabrilis, meaning "made by hand." The technique was developed at the Tiffany Glass and Decorating Company in the mid-1890s using filaments from batches of differently colored glass and working the material while the glass was still molten. Ornamentation was added before the piece had its final shape, so that the decoration became fully integrated into the vessel. The technique was used in both decorative vases and functional pieces such as tableware (bowls, goblets, carafes) and lamp shades. Tiffany intended the favrile designation as a guarantee to current customers and future collectors of the fine quality of these objects.

Tiffany Studios New York Favrile Glass Vase

Tiffany Studios New York Favrile Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York Favrile decorated vase. This vase features pulled copper decoration with iridescent gold trim against a golden ivory ground. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: "Louis C. Tiffany: Artist for the Ages" by Marilynn A. Johnson, London: Scala Publishers, Ltd., 2005, p. 229, cat. no. 131. Favrile is the trade name Tiffany gave to his blown art glass. The name derives from the Latin word fabrilis, meaning "made by hand." The technique was developed at Tiffany Furnaces in the mid-1890s using filaments from batches of differently colored glass and working the material while the glass was still molten. Ornamentation was added before the piece had its final shape, so that the decoration became fully integrated into the vessel. The technique was used in both decorative vases and functional pieces such as tableware (bowls, goblets, carafes) and lamp shades. Tiffany intended the favrile designation as a guarantee to current customers and future collectors of the fine quality of these objects.

Tiffany Studios New York  Favrile Vase

"Gentian" Tiffany Lamp

A Tiffany Studios New York "Gentian" table lamp. The shade is composed of leaded green, blue and white glass featuring floral stalks enclosed in Gothic arches. The middle row of the flaring apron is comprised of a row of uncut green gems. The patinated bronze base features openwork floral stalk decoration. This unique combination is rarely seen in Tiffany lamps. Pictured in: "The Lamps of Tiffany" by Egon Neustadt, p. 64, no. 90

'Gentian' Tiffany Lamp

Tiffany Studios New York Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York favrile vase with pulled decoration. The vase has an iridescent background graduating from opalescent through yellow and pink to orange, with dark red swirls. Favrile is the trade name Tiffany gave to his blown art glass. The name derives from the Latin word fabrilis, meaning "made by hand." The technique was developed at Tiffany Furnaces in the mid-1890s using filaments from batches of differently colored glass and working the material while the glass was still molten. Ornamentation was added before the piece had its final shape, so that the decoration became fully integrated into the vessel. The technique was used in both decorative vases and functional pieces such as tableware (bowls, goblets, carafes) and lamp shades. Tiffany intended the favrile designation as a guarantee to current customers and future collectors of the fine quality of these objects.

Tiffany Studios New York Vase

"Counter Balance" Tiffany Lamp

A Tiffany Studios New York "Counter Balance" glass and bronze table lamp, featuring a green Favrile glass "Damascene" shade on a patinated turtleback counter balance base. A similar shade and base are pictured separately in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988. Shade: p. 87, plate 342; base: p. 87, plate 341.

'Counter Balance' Tiffany Lamp

"Crocus" Tiffany Lamp

A Tiffany Studios New York "Crocus/Tulip" leaded glass and patinated bronze table lamp. A bouquet of deep amber, red, gold and yellow hued crocus blossoms with hints of red in various stages of bloom decorates this shade with a sunset ground. The shade sits atop a four footed "Pineapple" base decorated with green glass cabochons. A similar base and shade are pictured in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988. Shade: p. 137, plate 575; base: p. 64, plate 247.

'Crocus' Tiffany Lamp

Tiffany Studios New York Favrile Glass Vase

A Louis Comfort Tiffany favrile glass "Red Hooked Feather" vase, featuring a rich red color enhanced by an iridescent multicolored pulled feather motif that encircles the vase. Favrile is the trade name Tiffany gave to his blown art glass. The name derives from the Latin word fabrilis, meaning "made by hand." The technique was developed at the Tiffany Glass and Decorating Company in the mid-1890s using filaments from batches of differently colored glass and working the material while the glass was still molten. Ornamentation was added before the piece had its final shape, so that the decoration became fully integrated into the vessel. The technique was used in both decorative vases and functional pieces such as tableware (bowls, goblets, carafes) and lamp shades. Tiffany intended the favrile designation as a guarantee to current customers and future collectors of the fine quality of these objects.

Tiffany Studios New York Favrile Glass Vase

"Nasturtium" Tiffany Floor Lamp

A Tiffany Studios New York "Nasturtium" glass and bronze table lamp. The shade, depicting red, orange and pink blossoms on a variegated translucent green ground, sits atop a Tiffany Studios New York patinated bronze "Junior Onion Decorated" floor lamp base. A similar shade is pictured in: "The Lamps of Tiffany," by Dr. Egon Neustadt, New York: The Fairfield Press, 1970, p. 155, plate 218. A similar base is pictured in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988, p. 206, plate 801.

'Nasturtium' Tiffany Floor Lamp

Tiffany Studios New York Bluish Green Favrile Glass Vase

A bluish green Favrile glass vase by Louis Comfort Tiffany featuring a pulled silver iridescent border. Favrile is the trade name Tiffany gave to his blown art glass. The name derives from the Latin word fabrilis, meaning "made by hand." The technique was developed at the Tiffany Glass and Decorating Company in the mid-1890s using filaments from batches of differently colored glass and working the material while the glass was still molten. Ornamentation was added before the piece had its final shape, so that the decoration became fully integrated into the vessel. The technique was used in both decorative vases and functional pieces such as tableware (bowls, goblets, carafes) and lamp shades. Tiffany intended the favrile designation as a guarantee to current customers and future collectors of the fine quality of these objects.

Tiffany Studios New York Bluish Green Favrile Glass Vase

Tiffany Glass and Bronze "Dragonfly" Chandelier

A Tiffany Studios New York "Dragonfly" glass and bronze chandelier. This elegant chandelier is composed of a choice selection of glass, which makes this an exceptional example of Tiffany''s iconic dragonfly lamp. The dragonflies are composed of dark green glass bodies, variegated blue glass wings and red glass eyes. The cabochon glass jewels that surround this chandelier depict emeralds, sapphires and topaz. The two top and three bottom borders are made up of various colors of rippled glass. This exciting glass composition rests upon a ground of green, green/blue and brown glass. While Tiffany was largely credited for his company''s glass innovations during his lifetime, recent archival research has shed light on the unsung heroes behind his genius. Two such figures were responsible for the astounding effects of this dragonfly lamp: Tiffany had gone through four chemists before he landed on Arthur J Nash, a chemist previously employed at the White House Glass Works in Stourbridge. England. It was Nash''s formulas, developed from before his employment at Tiffany, that became the core of Tiffany''s palette. Nash was no stranger to experimentation, adding unconventional materials such as birch bark and burnt oats to create his amber glass. Clara Driscoll, head of the Tiffany Studios Women''s Glass Cutting Department, designed the dragonfly lamp, earning much acclaim for h ... er artistic prowess in her time. (For more information on her work see "A New Light on Tiffany: Clara Driscoll and the Tiffany Girls," by Martine Eidelberg, Nina Gray, and Margaret K. Hofer, 2007.) Louis Comfort Tiffany''s "Dragonfly" lamps have become so iconic and loved because the artisans who made them were not limited in color as they were when making floral and geometric shades. We can imagine that the dragonflies that adorn the lower edge of the shade are flying low across a verdant field. Similar chandeliers are pictured in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988, p. 230, plate 891-893.

< View More >
Tiffany Glass and Bronze 'Dragonfly' Chandelier

"Three-Light Piano Lily" Tiffany Lamp

A Tiffany Studios New York glass and bronze piano table lamp featuring a "Three-Light-Lily" with golden Favrile glass shades suspended above a patinated bronze decorated "Artichoke" base. A similar lamp is pictured in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988, p. 59, plate 212.

'Three-Light Piano Lily' Tiffany Lamp

"Geometric Brick" Tiffany Chandelier

A Tiffany Studios New York "Geometric" leaded glass and bronze chandelier. The green- and sunset-hued mottled glass shade features a geometric "brick" pattern. The shade hangs from a patinated bronze suspension. A similar hanging shade is pictured in: Alastair Duncan, "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models," Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club Ltd., 2007, p. 310, plate 1244.

'Geometric Brick' Tiffany Chandelier

"Nasturtium" Tiffany Lamp

A Tiffany Studios New York "Nasturtium" leaded glass and bronze table lamp, featuring a leaded glass shade depicting red, orange and yellow blossoms on a striking translucent green and blue ground. The shade sits on a patinated bronze base carved with flowers and curling tendrils reminiscent of fern fronds. A similar shade and base are pictured in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988. Shade: p. 155, plate 642; base: p. 107, plate 434. A similar shade, in a different color palate, is also pictured in: "The Lamps of Tiffany," by Dr. Egon Neustadt, New York: The Fairfield Press, 1970, p.155, plate 218 ; and in: "The Lamps of Tiffany Studios," by William Feldstein, Jr. and Alastair Duncan, New York: Harry N. Abrams, Inc., 1983, p. 119.

'Nasturtium' Tiffany Lamp

"Laburnum" Tiffany Lamp

A Tiffany Studios New York "Laburnum" table lamp. The shade features an upper portion of branches and foliage and cascading flower clusters, ending in an irregular border. The irregular undulating patterned border of the shade, comprised of three long flower clusters each surrounded by three smaller clusters, is one of its distinguishing characteristics. This exquisitely colored shade is decorated with olive green leaves and spotted lemon yellow, oriental yellow, light green and mauve flowers suspended from brown branches. The flowers are set against a brilliant bleu de roi background. Its unique design is attributed to Clara Driscoll, the head of the Tiffany Studios Women''s Glass Cutting Department. The shade sits on a patinated bronze "Twisted Vine" base. A similar lamp is pictured in: "A new light on Tiffany: Clara Driscoll and the Tiffany Girls," by Martin Eidelberg, Nina Gray, Martin K. Hofer, 2007. [On the occasion of the exhibition "A New Light on Tiffany", organized by the New-York Historical Society and on view February 23-May 28, 2007]. New York: New-York Historical Society, p. 192, fig. 100.

'Laburnum' Tiffany Lamp

"Three-Light Piano Lily" Tiffany Lamp

A Tiffany Studios New York "Three-Light-Lily" glass and bronze piano lamp. The lamp features three golden Favrile glass shades suspended above a patinated bronze decorated "Artichoke" base. PROVENANCE: From a Los Angeles, CA Collection. A similar lamp is pictured in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988, p. 59, plate 212.

'Three-Light Piano Lily' Tiffany Lamp

"Peony" Tiffany Lamp

Tiffany Studios New York "Peony" leaded glass and patinated bronze table lamp. The shade features red, pink and purple peonies with mottled green leaves against a striated blue and lavender ground. The shade sits atop a decorated patinated bronze library base. A similar shade is pictured in: "The Lamps of Tiffany," by Dr. Egon Neustadt, New York: The Fairfield Press, 1970, p. 140, plate 199. a similar base is pictured in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988, p. 74, plate 286.

'Peony' Tiffany Lamp

"Geometric Brick" Tiffany Chandelier

A Tiffany Studios New York leaded glass and bronze "Geometric" chandelier. The glass shade features a geometric "brick" pattern and is decorated in hues of green, flame orange and amber mottled glass. The shade hangs from a patinated bronze suspension. A similar hanging shade is pictured in: Alastair Duncan, "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models," Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club Ltd., 2007, p. 310, plate 1244.

'Geometric Brick' Tiffany Chandelier

"Peony" Border Tiffany Floor Lamp

Tiffany Studios border "Peony" floor lamp with peony blossoms ranging in color from pink to pink/red to pink/purple, surrounded by leaves in various shades of green. The background culminates at the top of the shade with rows of multihued red/blue/cyan glass. The shade is further accented by two rectangular bottom border rows. The upper one is of mottled amber/green glass, and the bottom one is of rippled green glass. The shade sits atop a patinated bronze decorated senior floor base. A similar shade is pictured in: "The Lamps of Tiffany," by Dr. Egon Neustadt, New York: The Fairfield Press, 1970, p. 29, cat. no. 111; and in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988, p. 204, plate 786. A similar base is pictured in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models", by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988, p. 200, plate 777.

'Peony' Border Tiffany Floor Lamp

"Flowering Water Lily" Tiffany Lamp

A Tiffany Studios New York "Flowering Water Lily" leaded glass and bronze table lamp. This very rare shade reveals the designer''s clever use of perspective in the handling of the lily pads. While the artist''s forking angle foreshortens all those at the lower edge, turning them into ovals and ellipses, their true roundness is observed in the upper reaches of the shade. One, right off center, has an uplifted edge, as if caught in a gust of wind. The pads are constructed of green glass, mottled with pink and orange. The pattern also contains numerous large lilies, with pink-white petals supported by round pinkish-brown stems. Flower buds are visible. All are laid against a mysterious blue glass watery ground. A band of green rippled glass, interrupted by an occasional bud, rims the aperture. A similar band, broken by both leaves and stems, encircles the shade almost at its bottom edge. The design, which is repeated three times, resumes below this row and continues right down to the lower border. Its depth of color, brilliance of design, and relative rarity combine to make this Flowering Water Lily one of the most impressive of all Tiffany lamp shades, fully entitled to the dash number (indicating a special order) awarded it. The shade sits atop a patinated bronze "cat tail" base. A similar shade is pictured in: "The Lamps of Tiffany," by Dr. Egon Neustadt, New York: The Fai ... rfield Press, 1970, p. 181, plate 146. A similar base is pictured in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988, p. 104, plate 414. A similar base is pictured in:" Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988, p. 94, plate 374.

< View More >
'Flowering Water Lily' Tiffany Lamp

"Eighteen-Light Lily" Tiffany Lamp

A Tiffany Studios New York Favrile glass and patinated bronze "Eighteen-light Lily" lamp with 18 golden iridescent glass "Lily" shades suspended over a patinated bronze "Lily Pad" base. Tiffany took this model to the Paris and Turin World''s Fairs around the turn of the century, where the American lamp made waves in the French Art Nouveau movement. Praised for its elegance, the Tiffany "Lily" has been called the "Aristocrat of the Garden." This particular lamp is of special historical importance, even compared with other models of the same design, because it is one of the earliest examples of the "Eighteen-Light Lily." It is outfitted with shades of particular delicacy and iridescence that would have accommodated the weak light from the then newly-invented light bulbs. The shades are mounted on slender curving stems that grow out of a base in the shape of water lily flowers and pads. A similar lamp is pictured in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988, p. 80, plate 313.

'Eighteen-Light Lily' Tiffany Lamp

"Wisteria" Tiffany Lamp

A Tiffany Studios New York "Wisteria" table lamp. A very fine and unusually rare lamp composed of a palette of wisteria blossoms in shades of blue, green, cream and white that cascade down the shade to an irregular border. The blossoms are surrounded by abundant leaves in varying shades of green and are delicately interspersed with "confetti" glass, lending them added three-dimensionality. The shade has a latticework top, portraying the branches and stems of a wisteria vine. The base, designed specifically to hold the shade, is also embelished with vegetal, vine-like properties. A similar lamp is pictured in: "The Lamps of Tiffany," by Dr. Egon Neustadt, New York: The Fairfield Press, 1970, p. 215, plate 287.

'Wisteria' Tiffany Lamp

"Venetian" Tiffany Lamp

A Tiffany Studios New York "Venetian" glass and bronze desk lamp with geometric and floral motif in gold, blue, red, and green hues. The lamp features three rows of graduated medallions framed in deep golden colored glass. The bottom row has green stylized trees with red accents on a blue ground. The middle row has golden and green geometric designs on a blue ground. The top row has green stylized leaves, also on a blue ground. The shade sits on a gilt bronze base decorated with open scrolling work, dark green glass cabochons and a series of small animals on the lower edge. All of the leading on the shade has gilt patina matching the gilt patina on the base. An interesting fact about this lamp is that Venetian lamps, when first offered for sale, had a list price of $250, while the Wisteria lamps were priced at $400, giving an indication of the importance of this design style. This was stated in the J. Walter Thompson price list of 1906. Circa 1900 A similar lamp is pictured in: "The Lamps of Tiffany," by Dr. Egon Neustadt, New York: The Fairfield Press, 1970 p.72, plate 104. "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988, p. 102, plate 403.

'Venetian' Tiffany Lamp

"Bamboo" Tiffany Lamp

A Tiffany Studios New York "Bamboo" leaded glass and bronze table lamp, featuring a leaded glass shade depicting bamboo leaves and stems in mottled green and brown glass against an opaque white ground The shade sits atop a "Bamboo" base and is adorned by a "Bamboo" finial. The base is decorated with fronds and is segmented like a bamboo stem. Provenance: Private Collection, North Carolina, circa 1970 Thence by descent to the present owner, 2004 Pictured in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware," by Alastair Duncan, Antique Collectors'' Club, 2007, page 99.

'Bamboo' Tiffany Lamp

"Jonquil-Daffodil" Tiffany Lamp

A Tiffany Studios New York gilt bronze and Favrile glass "Jonquil-Daffodil" lamp featuring a dome-shaped shade divided into an upper section comprising sixteen downturned trumpet narcissi blossoms in mottled yellow and creamy white colored glass surrounded by mottled blue and green colored stems against a mottled blue, green and blue geometric band.The lower section is decorated with three undulating rows comprising forty-eight daffodil blossoms, with opalescent and creamy white colored petals and yellow orange centers, continuing to a mottled green and blue geometric border. The shade rests upon a gilt bronze "Twisted Vine" base. Pictured in "The Lamps of Tiffany" by Egon Neustadt, page 143. A similar base is pictured in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988. base: p. 94, plates 373-374.

'Jonquil-Daffodil' Tiffany Lamp

Tiffany Studios New York Mosaic Candle Lamp

A Tiffany Studios New York Favrile glass and patinated bronze mosaic candle lamp. The mosaic candlestick base has inlaid panels of glass shading from green to blue running vertically along the side of the candlestick. The bronze candlestick is further decorated with blue glass tiles in a mosaic brick pattern surrounding the top of the stick. The Favrile shade adorns a green pulled feather design and is accented and outlined in gold iridescence set against a slightly iridescent tan background. A similar candlestick is pictured in the book Tiffany Lamps and Metalware by Alastair Duncan, page 385, illustration 1561. PROVENANCE: From the Unreserved Estate of Lynda Cunningham.

Tiffany Studios New York Mosaic Candle Lamp

Tiffany Studios "Bouquet" Chandelier

A Tiffany Studios New York "Bouquet" leaded glass and patinated bronze chandelier. This particular shade has a remarkable range of multi-colored red hued peony blossoms on swirled blue and purple background with a beaded top and bottom rim. Tiffany Studios manufactured a number of 28" hanging cone chandeliers. Each depicted an artist''s vision of a "dream garden," rather than reproducing natural forms and colors. These shades are among the most vibrant and colorful produced by the Studios. Although the variety of colors employed gives the impression that all these shades are unique in fact they use a single design. A similar shade is pictured in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988, p. 216, plate 851. 

Tiffany Studios 'Bouquet' Chandelier

Tiffany Studios "Arrowhead" Jardinere

A Tiffany Studios New York patinated bronze "Arrowhead" jardiniere with favrile mosaic glass and a copper interior. The beautifully striated blue and green glass mosaic arranged in stark geometric patterning is elegantly juxtaposed in this stunning piece by the flowing natural forms executed in bronze. A similar jardinere is pictured in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988, p. 396, plate 1608.

Tiffany Studios 'Arrowhead' Jardinere

Tiffany Studios New York Glass and Bronze Gimbal Candlestick with Snuffer

A Tiffany Studios New York favrile and turtleback tile glass and patinated bronze gimbal candlestick with snuffer. The shade features green pulled feathers on a cream background. It sits above a round iridescent leaded tuttleback glass ball. A similar piece is pictured in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antiques Collectors'' Club Ltd., p. 377, cat. 1544, #1208.

Tiffany Studios New York Glass and Bronze Gimbal Candlestick with Snuffer

"Daffodil" Tiffany Lamp

A Tiffany Studios New York "Daffodil" leaded glass shade featuring a bouquet of daffodil flowers with mottled green leaves and stems branching down from the top of the shade and set against a mottled golden ground. The shade is further decorated with a two-tone green and gold mottled glass brick pattern border. It sits on a patinated bronze rib base. A similar shade and base are pictured separately in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988. Shade: p. 153, plate 634; base: p. 77, plate 297. The shade is also pictured in: "The Lamps of Tiffany," by Dr. Egon Neustadt, New York: The Fairfield Press, 1970, p. 106, plate 154.

'Daffodil' Tiffany Lamp

Tiffany Studios New York Favrile Glass and Bronze "Harp" Floor Lamp

A Tiffany Studios New York "Harp" floor lamp with patinated bronze base and green blown-glass "Damascene" shade. This "Damascene" floor lamp is composed of a transparent green, "Dychroide" glass and iridized glass decoration. Of particular note is the complexity of the iridization on the lamp that uses two distinct metallic oxides applied in two different techniques. Initially, a shell of transparent green glass was blown onto a core of opaque white glass core, forming the lamp''s white interior and thin transparent green exterior. Subsequently, "Dychroide" glass was carefully trailed twenty-nine times around the form. This particular variety of "Dychroide" glass, an innovation by Arthur J. Nash, production manager at Tiffany Furnaces, has the unique quality of appearing green in reflected light and amber in transmitted light. This innovation gives a dynamic quality to Tiffany''s lamps that proved to be a true unification of form and function. When lit, the amber of the "Dychroide" glass causes the green to perceptually vibrate, further amplifying the effect of radiation in the lamp. The network of threads was subsequently marvered into the glass and evenly iridized with gold metallic oxides in the top half of the lamp and platinum metallic oxides in the bottom half of the lamp. Gold metal oxides that transition into strokes of platinum metallic oxides were then painted o ... bliquely around the form. The piece was then blown and tooled into a dome shape. Evidence that the glass was first iridized then blown can be found in the subtle craquelure of the iridescence towards the base of the lamp. The double iridization creates a high luster and an added depth to the piece. A comb with twenty-nine teeth (equivalent to the number of "Dychroide" glass trails) was evenly raked through the semi-molten glass. The combing was purposefully offset from the trails so that they could still be seen in the final wave pattern. The green trails without "Dychroide" threads transmit the most light, creating a vivid amber starburst pattern when lit. The lamp shade is surmounted by a cast bronze aperture ring with three ball screws and a liliform heat cap, terminating in a ball-shaped finial. The ventilation holes in the heat cap are subtly concealed by the five petals of the flower. The heat cap holds a light bulb and pull chain that terminates in an acorn pendant. The heat cap is supported on both sides by a harp with two component parts, a double ogee shoulder, and a single ogee base. The two parts of the harp are held together with a pin that allow the user to change the position of the light if they so wish. This mechanism is fitted with rosette motif side knobs that beautifully complement the liliform socket holder. The base of the harp splays into petals, connecting to the globular molding of a five-foot stem which swells, tapers, reswells, straightens, then reswells at the base. The stem is supported by five dartform feet. The cast bronze stem, harp, and base all have acid etched finishes giving them a red-speckled green patina. A similar base and shade are pictured separately in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988. Shade: p. 211, plate 827; base: p. 210, plate 821.

< View More >
Tiffany Studios New York Favrile Glass and Bronze 'Harp' Floor Lamp

"Counter Balance" Tiffany Lamp

A Tiffany Studios New York "Favrile" glass and patinated bronze desk lamp with a highly rare iridescent blue glass "Wave" design shade. This richly decorated shade is Dichroic, meaning it appears purple with silver highlights in reflected light, then changes to turquoise and royal blue when illuminated. The lamp base''s counterweight is decorated with a band of Tiffany''s famous "Turtleback" iridescent glass. The bottom of the base has an "artichoke feather" design. A similar lamp is pictured in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models," A. Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988, p. 87, plate 341.

'Counter Balance' Tiffany Lamp

Jeweled Bronze Candlestick by Tiffany Studios New YorK

A jeweled bronze candlestick by Tiffany Studios New York featuring a decorated foot and a slender stem. The stem branches out in three arms with candle cups adorned with iridescent glass jewels. The candle stick includes a snuffer and bronze bobeche inserts for each candle cup. PROVENANCE: From the Unreserved Estate of Lynda Cunningham. A similar candlestick is pictured in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988, p. 384, plate 1566.

Jeweled Bronze Candlestick by Tiffany Studios New YorK

"Poinsettia" Tiffany Lamp

A Tiffany Studios New York "Poinsettia" leaded glass and bronze table lamp. The shade features brilliant red poinsettias surrounded by multicolored green leaves and stems with yellow and yellow/orange centers on a mottled yellow ground. The shade also features a mottled green glass border at the bottom rim of this shade. The shade sits atop a patinated bronze bump base. A similar shade is pictured in: "The Lamps of Tiffany," by Dr. Egon Neustadt, New York: The Fairfield Press, 1970, p. 80, plate 112. A similar base is pictured in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models", by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988: p. 75, plate 289.

'Poinsettia' Tiffany Lamp

Tiffany "Maple Leaf" Floor Lamp

A Tiffany Studios New York "Maple Leaf" leaded glass and bronze floor lamp. The shade sits atop a Tiffany Studios New York patinated bronze "Decorated Junior" floor lamp base with Onion Bulb design. The Glass Selector at Tiffany Studios chose "mottled" glass in hues of green, blue and orange to depict the leaves of a Sugar Maple tree in dappled sunlight. The shade has a powder blue background meant to evoke the sky. Maples must be about 30 years old before they start seeding, so Tiffany chose to represent a mature tree in autumn, with three rows of green and orange samaras dropping through the sky to the ground, ensuring the species''s survival to the next generation. This rare and unusual "Maple Leaf" design was one of the last created at the Tiffany Studios, debuting in the 1915 Price Catalog. A similar shade and base are pictured separately in: A Tiffany Studios New York "Favrile" glass and patinated bronze desk lamp with a highly rare iridescent blue glass "Wave" design shade. This richly decorated shade is Dichroic, meaning it appears purple with silver highlights in reflected light, then changes to turquoise and royal blue when illuminated. The lamp base''s counterweight is decorated with a band of Tiffany''s famous "Turtleback" iridescent glass. The bottom of the base has an "artichoke feather" design. A similar shade and base are pictured separately in: ... "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988. Shade: p. 196, plates 768-769. Base: p. 206, plates 801-802.

< View More >
Tiffany 'Maple Leaf' Floor Lamp

Tiffany Studios ''Wire Mesh Poppy'' Lamp

A Tiffany Studios New York "Wire Mesh Poppy" leaded glass and patinated bronze table lamp. The shade features crimson red poppy blossoms in various stages of bloom and a band of green leaves against a mottled blue-green and brown hued ground, evocative of radiance. Wire mesh centers delineate the pistils and stamens of the blossoms in full bloom and wire mesh is also applied as the veining for the leaves. The shade is further decorated with a lower multicolored blue and deep blue brick border and sits atop a patinated bronze "Twisted Vine" base. Similar shades are pictured in: "The Lamps of Tiffany," by Dr. Egon Neustadt, New York: The Fairfield Press, 1970, pp. 108-109; and in "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988, p. 162, plate 667. A similar base is pictured in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988, p. 98, plate 392.

Tiffany Studios ''Wire Mesh Poppy'' Lamp

"Dragonfly" Tiffany Lamp

A Tiffany Studios New York leaded glass and patinated bronze "Dragonfly" table lamp. This shade features six dragonflies with green bodies and amber hued wings against a blue, green and yellow ground that fades into yellow at the top. Each dragonfly is adorned with crimson-colored glass eyes, and on one of the dragonflies the eyes are shifted so as to make it appear as if the insect is turning its head. The scene is contained in a lower border of yellow-green mottled glass with hints of blue. The shade sits atop a "Blown" glass base of alternating dark and lighter green, sitting on patinated bronze lily pads. Louis Comfort Tiffany''s "Dragonfly" lamps have become so iconic and loved because the artisans who made them were not limited in color as they were when making floral and geometric shades. Here we see the background fading from a bright green-blue to a yellow-green, and we can imagine that the dragonflies who adorn the lower edge of the shade are flying low across a verdant field. Similar shades, in various colors, are pictured in: "The Lamps of Tiffany", by Dr. Egon Neustadt, New York: The Fairfield Press, 1970, pp. 102-105. A similar base is pictured in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models", by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988, p. 39, plate 130.

'Dragonfly' Tiffany Lamp

Tiffany Studios New York ''Wisteria" Leaded Glass Window

An Art Nouveau ''Wisteria" leaded glass window by Tiffany Studios New York. Each blue wisteria panel is plated on the back side with various panels of confetti and striated glass forming individual petals of the wisteria flower, giving great depth of color. A large panel of striated amber glass is painted on the backside with a scenic design of a tree and pond, which is then plated over with a red panel creating great depth in the window. Wisteria flowers and vines are also the subject of a window pictured in: "Tiffany Windows: The indispensable book on Louis C. Tiffany''s masterworks," by Alastair Duncan, New York: Simon and Schuster, 1980, fig. 96.

Tiffany Studios New York ''Wisteria' Leaded Glass Window

Tiffany Studios Golden Stalactite Chandelier

A Tiffany Studios New York golden stalactite chandelier with stalactite shades in pulled feather motif suspended from a patinated bronze and brass chain and pole system. This chandelier features a larger central stalactite surrounded by 6 smaller stalactites. The stalactite shades are decorated in gold and brown on a yellow background. In 1897 Mark Twain embarked on a lengthy tour of North Africa and the Holy Land. Two years later he published "Innocents Abroad," a widely read and celebrated account of these travels. Inspired by Twain''s work, Louis Comfort Tiffany traveled to Northern Africa the same year "Innocents Abroad" was published. What he found in Northern Africa and Southern Spain was a seemingly an endless trove of artistic inspiration. Upon he returned he immediately created an oil painting titled "Market Day at Tangiers," depicting exactly that and particularly highlighting the Islamic architecture surrounding the market square in the city. Tiffany would later model the fountain court of his home at Laurelton Hall after the Court of the Lions at the Moorish palace La Alhambra in Granada. The Laurelton Hall fountain court, which was later described as "the soul of the house," by Tiffany scholars, was filled with arabesque texturing in the walls that created domed, stylized shelves called "muqarnas," a traditionally Moorish architectural feature. Tiffany so loved t ... he muqarnas walls that he designed Favrile glass forms to fit in the indentations, and, later still, Favrile glass shades, like those in this chandelier, to mimic and compliment their shape. A similar chandelier is pictured in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988, p. 299, plate 1186.

< View More >
Tiffany Studios Golden Stalactite Chandelier

"Geometric" Tiffany Lamp

A Tiffany Studios New York glass and bronze "Geometric" table lamp, featuring a mottled orange, yellow and green leaded glass shade atop an intricately sculpted patinated bronze base. This is one of the few Tiffany lamps where the base and shade were exclusively shown together, making this as much a piece of illuminated sculpture as a functional lamp. Pictured in: "Tiffany at Auction", by Alastair Duncan, Rizzoli International Publications, New York, 1981. Page 87, plate 232.

'Geometric' Tiffany Lamp

Tiffany "Turtleback Ball" Desk Lamp

A Tiffany Studios New York "Turtleback Ball" desk lamp with favrile glass shade and patinated bronze base. The base features a long swing arm culminating in a single blue iridescent tulip shade with green highlights. The incredible balance between the beautiful, undulating weight of the turtleback glass in the piece''s base and the light, feathery iridescent shade creates a work that is, as a whole, quite complex and incredibly special among Tiffany''s oeuvre. A similar base and shade are pictured separately in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models, by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988. Sh"ade: p. 100, plate 396; base: p. 97, plate 382.

Tiffany  'Turtleback Ball' Desk Lamp

Byzantine Bowl by Louis Comfort Tiffany

A Tiffany Studios New York Favrile glass bowl with Byzantine decoration. This delicate translucent bowl is decorated in the colors of silver, gold and green. It sits on three scroll-shaped glass feet. Favrile is the trade name Tiffany gave to his blown art glass. The name derives from the Latin word fabrilis, meaning "made by hand." The technique was developed at the Tiffany Glass and Decorating Company in the mid-1890s using filaments from batches of differently colored glass and working the material while the glass was still molten. Ornamentation was added before the piece had its final shape, so that the decoration became fully integrated into the vessel. The technique was used in both decorative vases and functional pieces such as tableware (bowls, goblets, carafes) and lamp shades. Tiffany intended the favrile designation as a guarantee to current customers and future collectors of the fine quality of these objects.

Byzantine Bowl by Louis Comfort Tiffany

"Greek Key" Tiffany Lamp

A Tiffany Studios New York "Greek Key" table lamp. The shade features an orange and gold mottled glass ground with a Greek key border in highly contrasting tones of light green, cyan and honey colored glass. The shade sits atop a "Wave" bronze base with a warm brown patina given a Japonist touch by the gold highlighted waves at the top and bottom of the base. A similar shade and base are pictured separately in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988. Shade: p. 184, plate 724; base: p. 110, plate 450.

'Greek Key' Tiffany Lamp

"Dragonfly" Tiffany Lamp

A Tiffany Studios New York leaded glass and patinated bronze "Dragonfly" table lamp. This shade features six dragonflies with green bodies and green-hued wings against a green and yellow ground that fades into the green-hued top. Each dragonfly is adorned with amber-colored glass eyes. The scene is contained in a lower border of yellow-orange-hued mottled glass. The shade sits atop a scroll base comprised of gilt bronze scroll embellishments circling the foot of the base. Louis Comfort Tiffany''s "Dragonfly" lamps have become so iconic and loved because the artisans who made them were not limited in color as they were when making floral and geometric shades. Here we see the background fading from a bright green-blue to a yellow-green, and we can imagine that the dragonflies who adorn the lower edge of the shade are flying low across a verdant field. Note: "A Dragonfly lamp was one of Tiffany''s first recorded lampshades, having been shown at the Grafton Galleries in London in 1899. This closely related model presented here was introduced the following year at the 1900 Paris World''s Fair. Equally important, here we know the name of the lamp''s designer: Clara Driscoll. Louis C. Tiffany made it a point to suppress all mention of the names of his company''s workers but, in this instance, the information regarding authorship came from an article about Driscoll and thus bypa ... ssed Tiffany''s censorship. It (the shade) was cited on the 1913 Price List, and it remained in production for yet another decade, with some eleven examples being made between 1921 and 1924." From "The Lamps of Louis Comfort Tiffany," Eidelberg, Frelinghuysen, McClelland, and Rachen, Thames & Hudson, 2005, pp. 186-88.

< View More >
'Dragonfly' Tiffany Lamp

Pair of Gilt "Six-Light Lily" Tiffany Lamps

A pair of Tiffany Studios New York "Six-Light Lily" Favrile glass and gilt bronze lamps. Although American, Tiffany participated fully in the French Art Nouveau movement. He exhibited at the World''s Fairs in Paris and Turin, where his "Lily" lamp won widespread acclaim. Praised for its elegance, the "Lily" has been called the "Aristocrat of the Garden." A similar lamp is pictured in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988, p. 57, plate 197.

Pair of Gilt 'Six-Light Lily' Tiffany Lamps

"Peony" Tiffany Lamp

A Tiffany Studios New York "Peony" table lamp. The shade features three different peony cultivars from Tiffany''s garden at Laurelton Hall: the Greek Peony (Paeonia parnassica), (Cup of Shining Night), and Shima Nishiki. This "Peony" lamp is an unusual variant featuring gold-Ruby drapery glass. This rare and costly glass variety was colored using gold chloride and produced in limited quantities between 1888 and 1890. Distinguishing this lamp is the nuance in coloration and texture. The palette of the lamp includes three different types of blue, five different types of green and three different types of red in a plethora of combinations and textures. The lampshade sits atop a rare Tiffany Studios New York patinated bronze lamp base with pierced Onion Bulb design. A similar shade is pictured in: "The Lamps of Louis Comfort Tiffany", by Martin Eidelberg, Alice Cooney Frelinghuysen, Nancy A. McClelland, and Lars Rachen, New York: The Vendome Press, 2005, p. 21, plate 20. A similar base is pictured in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models", by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988, p. 85, plate 330.

'Peony' Tiffany Lamp

Tiffany Studios "Marsh Marigold" Planter

A Tiffany Studios bronze "Marsh Marigold" planter, featuring a repeating pattern of marsh marigold leaves and vines around the gilt bronze base. The marsh marigold was included in one of the first four "Dragonfly" lamps made in April, 1899, entitled "Dragonfly and water flowers." The lamp was a collaboration between the female designers Clara Driscoll and Alice Carmen Gouvy. Gouvy, who would later design for the metalwork and enameling department created this breathtaking naturalistic design. The planter has faint reddish enameling in the design to give the illusion of a fierce sunset peaking through a dense underbrush. The truly organic shape of the leaves featured is highlighted by the undulating modeling of their forms. Identical model planter pictured in "Louis C. Tiffany''s Glass - Bronzes - Lamps: A complete collector''s guide", by Robert Koch, page 224.

Tiffany Studios 'Marsh Marigold' Planter

"Peacock" Tiffany Lamp

A Tiffany Studios New York "Peacock" leaded glass and bronze table lamp. The peacock was one of Tiffany''s favorite motifs. Here, brilliantly vari-colored peacock feathers against a rich green/purple/blue/mauve/yellow-orange ground create the pattern of the shade with the quills of the feathers prominently visible and the twenty peacock eyes arranged in two staggered rows. Brick borders of mauve, orange-yellow and cream/green glass and a scalloped apron further decorate the shade which sits atop a patinated bronze "Peacock" base specially designed for it, with "Peacock" leaded mosaic glass in "eyes" at the foot of the base. The play of light through the mottled glass, with its regal color palate, imbues the shade with the beguiling mystery of real peacock feathers. Circa 1910. A similar lamp is pictured in: "The Lamps of Tiffany", by Dr. Egon Neustadt, New York: The Fairfield Press, 1970, p. 139, plate 197. The shade is also pictured in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models", by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antiques Collectors'' Club Ltd., p. 142, cat. 592. Also pictured in: "The Lamps of Tiffany Studios", by William Feldstein, Jr. & Alastair Duncan. p. 130-131. Provenance: A prominent New York City surgeon 2019. With Macklowe Gallery New York 2015.

'Peacock' Tiffany Lamp

"Belted Turtleback" Tiffany Lamp

A Tiffany Studios New York glass and bronze "Belted Turtleback" table lamp, featuring a large band of iridescent green "Turtleback" tiles against a mottled brick pattern ground, atop a rare Tiffany Studios New York green and red patinated bronze lamp base with pierced Onion Bulb design. "Turtleback" tiles were an early invention of tiffany''s consisting of amber or blue glass and coated with an iridescence. His experiments predated the founding of Tiffany studios and distinguished him as a luminary of glass innovation. For the texture of his turtleback shells, Tiffany was inspired by the Neolithic Egyptian turtle carapace scale rings and bracelets excavated in cyprus. For his Egyptian fete (party) in 1913, Tiffany served turtle along with suckling pig and frog legs. Shade pictured in Tiffany Lamps and Metalware, An Illustrated Reference to Over 2000 Models, by Alastair Duncan, p.131, plate #1434. A similar base is pictured in: Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models, by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988, p. 85, plate 330.

'Belted Turtleback' Tiffany Lamp

Tiffany Studios "Prism" Chandelier

A Tiffany Studios New York glass and bronze "Prism" chandelier, featuring a decorated Favrile glass shade hanging in a circular row of iridescent gold glass "Prisms," all of which are suspended from a gilt bronze crown with hanging beaded detail. The shade is encircled by six green Favrile tulip shades with pulled feather decoration. A similar fixture is pictured in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988, p. 318, plate 1271.

Tiffany Studios 'Prism' Chandelier

"Favrile" Tiffany Lamp

A Tiffany Studios New York "Damascene" Favrile glass and patinated bronze base. This "Damascene" table lamp is composed of transparent green, "Dychroide" glass and iridized glass combed decoration. Of particular note is the complexity of the iridization on the lamp that uses two distinct metallic oxides applied in two different techniques. Initially, a shell of transparent green glass was blown onto a core of opaque white glass core, forming the lamp''s white interior and thin transparent green exterior. Subsequently, "Dychroide" glass was carefully trailed twenty-nine times around the form. This particular variety of "Dychroide" glass, an innovation by Arthur J. Nash, production manager at the Tiffany Furnaces, has the unique quality of appearing green in reflected light and amber in transmitted light. This innovation gives a dynamic quality to Tiffany''s lamps that proved to be a true unification of form and function. When lit, the amber of the "Dychroide" glass causes the green to perceptually vibrate, further amplifying the effect of radiation in the lamp. The network of threads was subsequently marvered into the glass and evenly iridized with gold metallic oxides in the top half of the lamp and platinum metallic oxides in the bottom half of the lamp. Gold metal oxides that transition into strokes of platinum metallic oxides were then painted obliquely around the form. ... The piece was then blown and tooled into a dome shape. Evidence that the glass was first iridized then blown can be found in the subtle craquelure of the iridescence towards the base of the lamp. The double iridization creates a high luster and an added depth to the piece. A comb with twenty-nine teeth (equivalent to the number of "Dychroide" glass trails) was evenly raked through the semi-molten glass. The combing was purposefully offset from the trails so that they could still be seen in the final wave pattern. The green trails without "Dychroide" threads transmit the most light, creating a vivid amber starburst pattern when lit. The shade sits on a patinated bronze urn-shaped base with three arms supporting the shade. Provenance: Property from the Geyer Collection A similar base and shade are pictured separately in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988. Shade: p. 59, plate 209; base: p. 32, plate 89.

< View More >
'Favrile' Tiffany Lamp

"DogWood" Tiffany Lamp

A Tiffany Studios New York "Dogwood" leaded glass and patinated bronze table lamp. The shade features a bouquet of pink, white and lavender dogwood blossoms against an blue and green mottled glass ground and is textured with Tiffany''s subtle use of rippled glass. The shade sits atop a patinated bronze decorated cushion base where the vines entwine themselves around the shaft of the base, almost to replicate the feeling of tendril like roots which evokes flower bulbs with overlaid scrolling bronze vines that wrap around the stem. The Dogwood was a well recorded favorite of Tiffany, who believed that the white flowers "reliably brighten things." The symbolic tradition of these bright, white flowers is quite rich; in Victorian times Dogwood flowers were given to young women by doting young men as a symbol of his affection. If the dogwood flower was kept it was a widely understood sign of mutual interest, however, if it was returned, it was the surest symbol of unrequited love. A similar base is pictured in: Alastair Duncan, "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models", Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club Ltd., 2007: p.75, plate 229.

'DogWood' Tiffany Lamp