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French Pâte-de-Verre Plaque by Cros

A French bas-relief glass pâte-de-verre plaque by Henri Cros, depicting a mythical dragon or sea creature in hues of pink, against a crystal-like ground. This is an experimental plaque by the originator of the revival of the ancient pâte-de-verre process.

French Pâte-de-Verre Plaque by Cros

French Art Nouveau Ceramic Covered Jar by Rupert Carabin

A French Art Nouveau ceramic covered jar by Rupert Carabin, depicting a female nude wrapped around a gourd form, with a deep green glaze. All of Carabin''s ceramic work was done by his own hand. This piece was made by Moulines, 20, rue Laffite. Pictured in: "L''oeuvre de Rupert Carabin 1862.1932," by Colette Merklen, page 228 and in "Dynamic Beauty: Sculpture of Art Nouveau Paris," by Macklowe Gallery, The Studley Press, 2011, p. 81.

French Art Nouveau Ceramic Covered Jar by Rupert Carabin

Van Cleef & Arpels Paris Mid-20th Century Coral, Diamond and Gold ''Clematis'' ''Rose de Noel'' Brooch

A French Mid-20th Century 18 karat gold "Clematis" brooch with diamonds and Mediterranean red coral by Van Cleef & Arpels. The brooch has 8 round-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of .64 carat forming the cluster center, surrounded by a yellow gold stamen, and 5 Mediterranean red coral petals. The flower has a polished gold stem and textured gold leaf. Of a similar motif as the ''Rose de Noel'' Collection. Circa 1960''s. A similar brooch is pictured in Living Jewels, by Ruth Peltason, Vendome Press, 2010, page 173.

Van Cleef & Arpels Paris Mid-20th Century Coral, Diamond and Gold ''Clematis'' ''Rose de Noel'' Brooch

French Armchairs by Louis Majorelle

A pair of French Art Nouveau "Pommes de Pins" walnut armchairs by Louis Majorelle. The chair backs and seats are upholstered in green fabric. They have carved arms, legs and spindle sides. This model of arm chair was used in the bed chamber of Madam Majorelle. Pictured in: "Majorelle: Une Aventure Moderne," by Roselyne Bouvier, Paris: La Bibliothèque des Arts, 1991, page 118, plate 120.

French Armchairs by Louis Majorelle

Austrian Vase by Karl Koepping

An Austrian slender and tall vase in deep purple glass by Karl Koepping. The vase''s color is reminiscent of the purple traditionally made from the spiny dye-myrex snail at great expense and associated with royalty. A similar vase is pictured in the "Art Decoratif 1899 2" page 211.

Austrian Vase by Karl Koepping

French Pâte-de-Verre Dish by Amalric Walter

A French ''Lucanes, cerf-volant'' pâte de verre by Amalric Walter and Henri Bergé. This piece features two scarabs atop a raised mound at the center of the dish. The glass of the surrounding dish graduates from opaque fiery ochre to translucent gold. A similar dish is pictured in : Amalric Walter (1870-1959), by Keith Cummings, Kingswinford: Broadfield House Glass Museum, 2006, p. 24, plate 26.

French Pâte-de-Verre Dish by Amalric Walter

Art Nouveau Enameled and Etched Glass Vase by Daum

A French Art Nouveau enameled and etched glass vase by Daum. The curved stems of the organic scene are mimicked by the amphoric body of the vase. This bright vase is dominated by two planes of mottled glass, golden yellow on top of deep purple, which together create a landscape scene. The vase is decorated with etched and enameled flowers. The flora seem to grow from the base of the vase because of the landscape effect achieved in the ground behind the scene. At the base, the leaves and stems of the flowers appear as shadows, as they are only etched into the dark ground. Once the flora break through into the golden section of the vase, the etched scene is enhanced by bright, verdant green enamel, which gives way to vibrant red orchids. The scene is completed by a curious bee floating up to the blossom. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: Daum: Maitres Verriers, 1890-1980, by Noël Daum, Lausanne: Edita Denoël, 1980, p. 122.

Art Nouveau Enameled and Etched Glass Vase by Daum

Art Nouveau Enameled and Etched Glass Vase by Daum

A French Art Nouveau enameled and etched glass vase by Daum. This vase is an elliptic cylinder, a shape which Daum used because it lends itself to undulating and soft nature scenes. This bright vase is dominated by two planes of mottled glass, golden yellow on top of deep purple, which together create a landscape scene. The vase is decorated with etched and enameled flowers. The flora seem to grow from the base of the vase because of the landscape effect achieved in the ground behind the scene. At the base, the leaves and stems of the flowers appear as shadows, as they are only etched into the dark ground. Once the flora break through into the golden section of the vase, the etched scene is enhanced by bright, verdant green enamel, which gives way to vibrant red orchids. The scene is completed by a curious bee floating up to the blossom, ready to pollinate it. The presence of the bee implies that this springtime scene is not entirely completed in the vase, but that it is rather just a part of a fleeting moment rendered in glass. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: Daum: Maitres Verriers, 1890-1980, by Noël Daum, Lausanne: Edita Denoël, 1980, p. 122.

Art Nouveau Enameled and Etched Glass Vase by Daum

Mid-20th Century Diamond and Platinum Bracelet

A Mid-20th Century platinum bracelet with diamonds. The flexible bracelet contains 178 baguette diamonds with an approximate total weight of 20.00 carats, centering on a square-cut diamond with an approximate total weight of 1.00 carat, and 98 round-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of 9.50 carats. The approximate total weight of diamonds is 30.50 carats, G/H/I color, VS clarity. Similar bracelets are pictured in Les Bijoux Des Annees 50, by Melissa Gabardi, Les éditions de l''amateur, 1987, page 127, 131-132.

Mid-20th Century Diamond and Platinum Bracelet

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

A French Art Nouveau cameo glass vase by Daum, decorated with deeply wheel-carved green flowers on rose and pink ground, with applied foot. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: "Daum Nancy III" by Katharina Büttiker, Zurich: Galerie Katharina Büttiker, 2009, p. 88 ("Fern" Vase).

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

A French Art Nouveau cameo glass boat-form vase by Daum, featuring an applied wheel-carved pink flowers and etched green leaves. This small, delicate vase has an unusual shape. A similar vase is pictured in: "Daum" by Clotilde Bacri, Noël Daum and Claude Pétry, Paris: Michel Aveline Éditeur, 1992, p. 91.

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

A French Art Nouveau wheel-carved cameo glass vase by Daum, featuring a decoration of blue flowers and light blue and grey stems and leaves on an opaque, mottled white and yellow ground. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: "Daum Frères: Maîtres Verriers, 1892-1935," by Katharina Büttiker-Weber, Zurich: Galerie Katharina Büttiker, 1986, cat. no. 114.

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

A French Art Nouveau wheel-carved and acid-etched cameo glass vase by Daum, featuring a carved mottled pink flower against an opaque textured ground. An identical vase is pictured in: "Daum: Collection du muse des Beaux-Arts de Nancy," Paris: Réunion des musées nationaux, 2000, cat. no. 219.

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

A French Art Nouveau cameo glass vase by Daum, featuring deep blue flowers on a mottled white and blue ground. The vase has both wheel-carving and martelé techniques. A similar vase is pictured in: "Daum Nancy III: Daum Frères – Verreries de Nancy, 1880-1930," by Katharina Büttiker, Zurich: Galerie Katharina Büttiker, 2009, p. 149.

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

A French Art Nouveau wheel-carved cameo glass pitcher by Daum, featuring an applied flowering white jonquils with yellow centers, flower buds and blades of grass against a mottled blue and white ground. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: "Daum Nancy: Maîtres Verriers" by Katharina Büttiker, Zurich: Galerie Katharina Büttiker, 2001, p. 125, cat. no. 76.

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass "Blooming Flower" Vase by Daum

A French Art Nouveau wheel-carved cameo glass vase by Daum, featuring a blooming flower in a deep blue, on an opaque white and mottled blue ground. A vase decorated in a similar style is pictured in: "Daum: Collection du muse des Beaux-Arts de Nancy," Paris: Réunion des musées nationaux, 2000, cat. no. 206.

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass 'Blooming Flower' Vase by Daum

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

A French Art Nouveau wheel-carved cameo glass vase by Daum, featuring blue flowers and dark green stems and leaves against a mottled white and blue ground. A vase decorated in a similar style is pictured in: "Daum: Collection du muse des Beaux-Arts de Nancy," Paris: Réunion des musées nationaux, 2000, cat. no. 224.

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

A French Art Nouveau satin-finished cameo glass vase, "Fleur de Coloquinte", by Daum, featuring the depiction of zucchini leaves and flowers in pale green, against a mottled opaque white and orange ground. The vase features the soufflé, or "blown-out" technique, making the leaves and flowers stand out from the shape of the vase. Pictured in: "Daum - Maitres Verriers" by Edita Denoel, Edita S.A. Lausanne, 1980, p. 61.

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

French Art Nouveau "Snow Drop" Vase by Daum

A French Art Nouveau cameo glass "Snow Drop" vase by Daum, featuring carved light blue flowers on brown stems against a mottled white and blue ground. A similar vase is pictured in: "Daum Nancy: Maîtres Verriers" by Katharina Büttiker, Zurich: Galerie Katharina Büttiker, 2001, p. 68, cat. no. 43.

French Art Nouveau 'Snow Drop' Vase by Daum

French Art Nouveau Glass and Wood Footed Bowl by Emile Gallé

A French Art Nouveau glass and wood footed bowl by Emile Gallé, featuring a multicolored pinched-sided glass bowl in yellow, purple, and green. The bowl sits atop a carved walnut foot with openwork floral design and scrolled base. Pictured in "Meubles et Ensembles Style 1900" by Edith Mannoni, page 54. Provenance: Private collection of Mr. Robert S. Walker.

French Art Nouveau Glass and Wood Footed Bowl by Emile Gallé

French Art Nouveau Wheel Carved Cameo Glass Bottle

A French Art Nouveau wheel-carved cameo glass bottle with stopper. The bottle is decorated with an iris flower on an opalescent background. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: "Liberty: Natura e materia" by Donata Patrussi and Giovanni Renzi, Milan: Giunti, 2011, p. 85.

French Art Nouveau Wheel Carved Cameo Glass Bottle

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

A French Art Nouveau wheel-carved cameo glass vase by Daum, featuring a decoration of blue flowers and light blue/grey stems and leaves on an opaque, mottled white and yellow ground. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: "French Cameo Glass" by Berniece and Henry Blount, Des Moines: Dr.& Mrs. Henry Blount, Jr., 1968, p. 74, cat. no. 102.

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

A French Art Nouveau cameo glass vase by Daum, comprised of three pinkish-red poppy flowers wheel carved to show different stages of bloom, against a sky blue martelé technique background, with brown foliage and peach tones towards the bottom to represent the rising sun. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: "Daum: Maitres Verriers, 1890-1980," by Noël Daum, Lausanne: Edita Denoël, 1980, p. 115 (bottom left); and in: "Daum Nancy III: Daum Frères – Verreries de Nancy, 1880-1930," by Katharina Büttiker, Zurich: Galerie Katharina Büttiker, 2009, p. 118.

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

French Art Nouveau "Mimosa" Vase by Daum

An artistic French Art Nouveau mimosa vase by Daum featuring pink cameo overlay naturalistically modeled as a languid orchid. The influences of Japanese culture permeated fin de siècle Paris and could be felt in museums and in homes. Similarly, a nascent fascination with natural forms, found in publications of the day like Ernst Haeckle''s Kunstformen der Natur, manifested itself in a proliferation of flowers in French art and design and in an intense investigation of flora where artists rivaled botanists. This piece borders on abstraction. The orchid, splayed open and surrounded by copious pollen spores, is imbued with feminine sensuality. The imaginative color palate and curving lines surpass the glass design standards of the day and render this piece a beguiling objet d''art.

French Art Nouveau 'Mimosa' Vase by Daum

French Art Nouveau Vase "Squash Blossom" by Daum

A French Art Nouveau clear glass vase with green cameo overlay in a squash blossom motif by Daum. The vase has deep green leaves, buds, flowers and a squash suspended from sinuous vines. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: "Daum: Collection du muse des Beaux-Arts de Nancy," Paris: Réunion des musées nationaux, 2000, cat. no. 224.

French Art Nouveau Vase 'Squash Blossom' by Daum

"Rose de France" Vase by Emile Gallé

A French Art Nouveau "Rose de France" vase by Emile Gallé. In 1870, Nancy, the home of Gallé, was annexed by Germany as a result of the defeat of France in the Franco-Prussian war. Gallé chose to use the motif of the red rose, which only bloomed in the Mt. Saint-Quentin province of Lorraine, as a symbol of his strident patriotism. In 1902 a vase from this series was presented to the Russian emperor as a prestigious gift from France. The vase shows Gallé''s innovative technique of glass marquetry which involved the incorporation of glass fragments of various thickness, shapes and colors into the still malleable glass. The multi-layering of glass and the use of metallic foils behind the glass make this piece so exceptional. A similar vase is pictured in: "Gallé", catalogue for the exhibition at le Musée du Luxembourg, Paris, November 1985-February 1986, "Paris: Éditions de la Réunion des muse nationaux", 1985, p. 149.

'Rose de France' Vase by Emile Gallé

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

A French Art Nouveau wheel-carved cameo glass vase by Daum, featuring green leaves and orange berries against a dark orange and mottled light green ground. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: "Daum" by Clotilde Bacri, Noël Daum and Claude Pétry, Paris: Michel Aveline Éditeur, 1992, p. 95.

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

French Art Nouveau Ceramic Vase by de Feure

A French Art Nouveau porcelain vase by Georges de Feure, featuring a blue and pink floral decoration on a glazed cream-white ground. Made for La Maison Art Nouveau Bing. Similar vase in the collection of the Musée des Arts Décoratifs. Similar vases pictured in: "Art Nouveau Bing: Paris Style 1900" by Gabriel Weisberg, p. 204, pl. 198.

French Art Nouveau Ceramic Vase by de Feure

French Art Nouveau Ceramic "Gourd" Vase by Ernest Bussière

A French Art Nouveau ceramic "Gourd" vase designed by Ernest Bussière and produced by Keller et Guérin, featuring stylized high-relief berries on the gourd form, with green and purple enameled glazes. This vase was shown at the Exposition de l''Ecole de Nancy in Paris in 1903 (see "The Paris Salons 1895-1915, Vol. IV: Ceramics and Glass," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1998, p.261).

French Art Nouveau Ceramic 'Gourd' Vase by Ernest Bussière

French Art Nouveau Ceramic Vase by Bussière

A French Art Nouveau vase designed by Ernest Bussière and produced by Keller et Guérin, depicting two lizards in high relief wrapped around the rim. The vase features iridescent milky-green and mauve glazes with iridescent highlights. A similar vase was shown at the Exposition de l''Ecole de Nancy in Paris in 1903 (see "The Paris Salons 1895-1915, Vol. IV: Ceramics and Glass," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1998, p.260).

French Art Nouveau Ceramic Vase by Bussière

French Art Nouveau Ceramic Vase by Bussière

A French Art Nouveau vase by Keller and Guérin, from a design by Ernest Bussière, featuring the form of a closed flower in relief, with iridescent milky-green and mauve glazes. A similar vase was shown at the Exposition de l''Ecole de Nancy in Paris in 1903 (see "The Paris Salons 1895-1915, Vol. IV: Ceramics and Glass," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1998, p. 260).

 French Art Nouveau Ceramic Vase by Bussière

French Art Nouveau "Ombellifère" Ceramic Vase by Bussière

A French Art Nouveau iridescent glazed ceramic "Ombellifère" vase designed by Ernest Bussière and produced by Keller et Guérin, depicting ombelle blossoms in low relief, with six flowers whose stems extend away from the body of the vase to form delicate handles. A similar vase was shown at the Exposition de l''Ecole de Nancy in Paris in 1903 (see "The Paris Salons 1895-1915, Vol. IV: Ceramics and Glass," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1998, p.260).

French Art Nouveau 'Ombellifère' Ceramic Vase by Bussière

French Art Nouveau Ceramic Vase by Bussière

A French Art Nouveau ceramic vase designed by Ernest Bussière and produced by Keller et Guérin. The vase is decorated with vegetal forms and has a glaze of pale green with traces of purple. A similar vase was shown at the Exposition de l''Ecole de Nancy in Paris in 1903 (see "The Paris Salons 1895-1915, Vol. IV: Ceramics and Glass," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1998, p.260).

French Art Nouveau Ceramic Vase by Bussière

French Art Nouveau Covered Porcelain Jar by de Feure

A French Art Nouveau covered porcelain jar designed by Georges de Feure and manufactured by Dufraisseix & Abbot, Limoges for Art Nouveau Bing. In the manner of de Feure''s renowned textiles, this piece is decorated with elegantly painted abstract floral and vegetal designs. Pictured in "The Paris Salons 1895-1914: Volume IV Ceramics & Glass," by Alastair Duncan, Page 159.

French Art Nouveau Covered Porcelain Jar by de Feure

French Art Nouveau Games Table by Gallé

A French Art Nouveau games table by Emile Gallé, featuring inlaid fruitwood marquetry depicting thistles and card suit symbols. The table''s apron has a series of carved card suit symbols on all four sides. A similar table is pictured in: "Gallé Furniture" by Alastair Duncan and Georges de Bartha, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 2012, p. 130, plate 1.

French Art Nouveau Games Table by Gallé

French Art Nouveau "Aux Pins" Armchair by Majorelle

A French Art Nouveau carved walnut upholstered armchair, "Aux Pins," by Louis Majorelle. The chair has carved wooden sections depicting pine cones, a recurring motif in Majorelle''s naturalist vocabulary. A similar chair appears in "Majorelle - Nancy: décorations d''intérieurs: meubles, tentures, bronzes, ferronneries" (the 1906 Majorelle catalogue), as Cabinet de Travail "Les Pins", and in "The Paris Salons, 1895-1910, Volume III: Furniture," by Alastair Duncan, Antique Collectors'' Club, Publishers, page 407.

French Art Nouveau 'Aux Pins' Armchair by Majorelle

French Art Nouveau Wooden "Ombelle" Table by Emile Gallé

A French Art Nouveau "Ombelle" carved walnut table, by Emile Gallé. The table is decorated with fruitwood marquetry featuring a butterfly alighting on an ombelle blossom and has three carved feet. A similar table is pictured in: "Gallé Furniture" by Alastair Duncan and Georges de Bartha, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 2012, p. 202, plate 182.

French Art Nouveau Wooden 'Ombelle' Table by Emile Gallé

French Art Nouveau Games Table by Gallé

A French Art Nouveau games table in cedar and walnut by Emile Gallé, featuring inlaid marquetry when closed and open. When closed, the marquetry decoration is of tree branches with buds and flowers and can serve as an end table. Opened, the motif is more foliate. A similar table is pictured in: "Gallé Furniture" by Alastair Duncan and Georges de Bartha, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 2012, p. 134, plates 8 and 8a.

French Art Nouveau Games Table by Gallé

French Art Nouveau Desk

A French Art Nouveau mahogany Ecole de Nancy desk, featuring a hand-tooled leather top, letter rack and bronze drawer pulls with a floral motif. The rounded carved details also draw inspiration from vegetal forms.

French Art Nouveau Desk

Mellerio dits Meller French Mid-20th Century Diamond and Platinum Necklace Bracelet and Tiara

A French Mid-20th Century platinum and diamond necklace/tiara by Mellerio dits Meller. The necklace is composed of 200 round-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of 44.25 carats, and 200 baguette diamonds with an approximate total weight of 45.75 carats. Approximate total carat weight is 90.00 carats, G/H color, VS clarity. The triple row necklace is formed of two outer rows of round-cut diamonds and a center row of baguette diamonds. The necklace separates forming a separate bracelet. The tiara frame is decorated with 7 round cut pastes. Mellerio fitted box. Mellerio dits Meller, the French jewelry house, was founded in 1613, and is still active today. "With jewelry for Marie-Antoinette, brooches for Princess Mathilde and tiaras for the court of the Netherlands, some of the biggest names in European royal history have cameos in the history of Mellerio dits Meller. The story of this jeweler to kings and queens has been written in gold and precious stones ever since Marie de Medicis lent her support to the house in 1613." Vincent Meylan, Mellerio historian.

Mellerio dits Meller French Mid-20th Century Diamond and Platinum Necklace Bracelet and Tiara

Art Nouveau pâte-de-verre tray by Bergé and Walter,

A French Art Nouveau glass pâte-de-verre tray designed by Henri Bergé and executed by Amalric Walter, featuring yellow, orange and green striations. The tray is adorned with an ocean scene featuring a blue/green crab atop seaweed. A similar tray is pictured in "Almaric Walter (1870-1959)" by Keith Cummings, Kingswinford (UK): Broadfield House Glass Museum, 2006, page 73 plate 113.

Art Nouveau pâte-de-verre tray by Bergé and Walter,

Walter and Finot Glass Tray

"La Femme Couchée", A French Art Nouveau glass pâte-de-verre paperweight (press-papiers) designed by A. Finot and executed by Amalric Walter, cast in the form of a female nude with light brown hair reclining on a bed of leaves colored in various tones of yellowish/orange and green. A similar piece, entitled Femme couchée, is pictured in: La pâte de verre, by Nöel Daum, Paris: Edition Denöel, 1984, page 105, plate 129.

Walter and Finot Glass Tray

French Art Nouveau pâte-de-verre Vase, titled "Primeveres" by Rousseau,

A French Art Deco pâte-de-verre vase, titled "Primevères" (Primroses) by Gabriel Argy-Rousseau featuring purple and red organic organic decoration in relief agains a multi-colored ground. The vase is further decorated with a purple art deco ornamental upper border. Pictured in: "G.Argy-Rousseau: Les Pâtes de Verres, catalogue raisonné" by Janine Bloch-Dermant (Paris: Les Editions de l''Amateur, 1990), page 196, cat. no. 24.02.

French Art Nouveau pâte-de-verre Vase, titled 'Primeveres' by Rousseau,

Art Nouveau Bisque Ceramic Sculpture by Agathon Leonard titled "Danseuse au Cothurne"

A French Art Nouveau bisque ceramic figural sculpture by Agathon Léonard, featuring a woman holding her dress with her right hand. Titled "Danseuse au cothurne" from "Le jeu de l''écharpe." This figure is one of the "la danse" (the dance) set, originally produced and cast by Sèvres and presented by the artist at the 1900 Paris Exposition Universelle. A cothurne (English translation cothurnus) was a laced boot worn by actors in Greek and Roman tragedies. Le jeu d''écharpe, created by Agathon Léonard at the turn of the 20th century, consists of 15 sculptures of young women in various poses. Some women dance with scarves; others hold musical instruments or carry flaming torches. Each of the 15 dancers is unique in terms of her pose, hair style and dress. Their dresses exhibit fluid drapery with flowing sleeves. The series was produced in both bronze and ceramic. Le jeu d''echarpe was inspired by the dancer Loïe Fuller. This smaller size series is extremely rare. A similar model is pictured in "Agathon Léonard: Le geste Art Nouveau" by Ingelore Boestge, Somogy editions d''art, Paris 2003, p.51, Plate number 13.

Art Nouveau Bisque Ceramic Sculpture by Agathon Leonard titled 'Danseuse au Cothurne'

Art Nouveau Patinated Bronze Figural Sculpture by Ségoffin

A French Art Nouveau patinated bronze figural sculpture, depicting a dancer with scarves and cymbals by Victor Ségoffin (1867-1925). Born in Toulouse, educated at Ecole nationale superieure des Beaux-Arts in Paris under Louis-Ernest Barrias and Pierre-Jules Cavelier, Segoffin won the Prix de Rome for sculpture in 1897.

Art Nouveau Patinated Bronze Figural Sculpture by Ségoffin

French Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

A French wheel carved cameo glass vase by Daum. The creation of this vase combined the technique of hammering for the foot and wheel carving for the flower decorations. The background is made of opalescent glass, with green and orange flowers standing against it. The hammered foot is in a darker orange/red color.

French Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

French Cameo and Martelé Glass "Crocus" Vase by Daum

A French wheel carved cameo and martelé glass "Crocus" vase by Daum. This Daum vase has gray cameo glass. It is decorated with stems and leaves ascending from the bulbous foot leading to padded and wheel-carved crocus flowers. The crocus flowers are arranged in a variation of purple and orange over white. The overall decoration is set against a background of mottled blue, shading to yellow and lavender. A similar vase is pictured in: "Daum Frères: Maîtres Verriers, 1892-1935," by Katharina Büttiker-Weber, Zurich: Galerie Katharina Büttiker, 1986, cat. no. 73.

French Cameo and Martelé Glass 'Crocus' Vase by Daum

French ''Ecureuils dans l''herbe", pâte de verre vase by Argy-Rousseau

A French ''Ecureuils dans l''herbe" pâte de verre vase by Gabriel Argy-Rousseau. Nature, notably flowers and insects, held an important place among the themes developed by Argy-Rousseau. He belongs to this generation of artists who, rebelling against a growing urbanization, seek refuge in nature, This vase depicts a squirrel playing in the grass. A similar piece is pictured in: cf. J. Bloch-Dermont, Les Pâtes de Verre G. Argy-Rousseau Catalogue Raisonné, Paris, 1990, p. 216, no. 28.05. for another vase of this model.

French ''Ecureuils dans l''herbe', pâte de verre vase by Argy-Rousseau

French Art Nouveau cameo glass vase by Émile Gallé

A French Art Nouveau cameo glass vase by Émile Gallé. This large vase is decorated with wheel carved purple trumpet-creepers and vines against a green background. The flowers and vines climb up the ribbed neck of the vase. The "liseron" vase is a flattened baluster form vase with an everted mouth, rounded and polished rim, long slender-waisted neck, short globular body, and an applied disk foot. The vase features an intercalaire layer of coarse jade frit in the top three-quarters of the vase and fine indigo frit in the bottom quarter of the vase. To construct the vase, a bubble was blown into the gather, which was cased and parison inflated into a dip mold with 19 ribs. The stem was subsequently plucked out and twisted counterclockwise. Finally, a soffieta was used to open the mouth and a pair of jacks was used to evert the rim. The vase was later cameo cut with exquisite detailing in the venation and the hirsute texture of the leaves. The vase depicts eight heads of Liseron japonais (Ipomoea nil ([Japanese morning glory].) The flower was introduced to Nancy by Takashima Hokkai, a fellow member of the Ecole de Nancy and Japanese Director of Forestry. Hokkai was invited as a juror for the Central Nancy Horticultural society exhibition of 1887. At the exhibition, Gallé presented Hokkai a Japanese morning glory in thanks for his contributions to the field of horticulture. ... The Japanese morning glory adorned the walls of Gallé''s studio until his death in 1904. To accompany this oriental flower, Gallé has given the morning glories a jade background. Commonly featured in the eighteenth century Shigemasa Kitao birds and flower prints that Gallé consulted, the creation of a jade simulant is only fitting for this oriental flower.

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French Art Nouveau cameo glass vase by Émile Gallé

French Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

A French cameo glass vase by Daum. This beautiful vase, moving from blue to yellow and orange, imitates the sun setting on water, represented by water lilies.

French Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

French ''Grande berce des prés'' Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

A French ''Grande berce des prés'' cameo glass vase by Daum. The vase is a progression from green hammered glass on the top to a clearer glass with shades of pink and finally back to the hammering technique on the foot. It is decorated with flowers and leaves on long stems.

French ''Grande berce des prés'' Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

French "Musiciens Grecs" pâte de verre Vase by Gabriel Argy-Rousseau

A French "Musiciens Grecs" pâte de verre vase by Gabriel Argy-Rousseau. One of Argy-Rousseau''s most important source of inspiration was Ancient Greece, and the subject matter of this vase relates to that theme. Against a pale pink background stands a musician playing the lyre, one of the most emblematic Greek instruments. The frieze on the bottom of the vase reminds one of the magnificent friezes in Greek temples. A similar piece is pictured in: cf. J. Bloch-Dermont, Les Pâtes de Verre G. Argy-Rousseau Catalogue Raisonné, Paris, 1990, p. 216, no. 28.03 for another vase of this model.

French 'Musiciens Grecs' pâte de verre Vase by Gabriel Argy-Rousseau

"Femme au Pieuvre" French Art Nouveau Glazed Ceramic Inkwell by Rupert Carabin

A French Art Nouveau "Femme-Pieuvre," brown glazed ceramic inkwell by Rupert Carabin, wherein a woman ecstatically rips open the head of an octopus, spilling its ink. A beautiful play on an ancient means of sourcing ink, this sculpture''s tranquility and solidity give it the aura of an ancient carving. Pictured in: "The Paris Salons 1895-1914, volume IV: Ceramics and Glass" by Alastair Duncan, p.76; "L''Oeuvre de Rupert Carabin 1862-1932, Catalogue D''exposition, Galerie du Luxembourg", 1974, pp.229 and 232; "Art Nouveau, Sculpture" by Alastair Duncan, Academy Edition, 1978, p.20; and in: "Le Modern style" by Laurence Buffet-Challié, p.74, plat 2.

'Femme au Pieuvre' French Art Nouveau Glazed Ceramic Inkwell by Rupert Carabin

French Art Nouveau Ceramic Inkwell by Carabin

A French Art Nouveau "Femme à la Coloquinte," glazed ceramic inkwell by François-Rupert Carabin. The inkwell features a nude woman embracing an unusually large gourd. A similar sculpture is pictured in: "L''ouevre de Rupert Carabin, 1982-1932," catalogue of the exhibition at le Musée du Luxembourg, Paris, 1974, p. 230, cat. no. 189.

French Art Nouveau Ceramic Inkwell by Carabin

Art Nouveau "Crabe" vide-poche by Amalric Walter

A French "Crabe" pâte de verre vide-poche by Amalric Walter. The reddish-brown crab has spots of dark green, red and yellow on the top portion of its shell. It sits on a green wave with long strands of seaweed. A similar vide-poche is pictured in: Amalric Walter (1870-1959), by Keith Cummings, Kingswinford: Broadfield House Glass Museum, 2006, p. 18, cat. no. 15.

Art Nouveau 'Crabe' vide-poche by Amalric Walter

"Tale of Genji" Commode by Émile Gallé

A French Art Nouveau marquetry commode by Émile Gallé. With original key. The syncretic influence of Japanese art is keenly felt in Gallé''s commode. The beginning of Galle''s fascination with Japanese art can be traced back to his friendship with Hokkai Takashima (1850-1931), a fellow botanist and member of the École de Nancy. Their botanical dialogue was facilitated by the Shokobutsu mei-i, a book of Japanese names for botanical species. It is from Hokkai that Gallé gained a spiritual and symbolic understanding of nature. Along with other École de Nancy artists, Hokkai and Gallé exhibited together in the display window of René Wiener''s papeterie. The store served as the office of Wiener''s arts journal, the Nancy artiste, which regularly featured on its covers contemporary examples of Gansai (Japanese watercolor), Byobu (folding screens) from the Rinpa school, Sumi-e (ink painting), and Ukiyo-e (woodblock prints). As a show of gratitude, Hokkai bequeathed a vast art book collection to Wiener. It is from this record that we know with certainty of which Japanese artists Gallé had knowledge. One of the books in Hokkai''s collection was Hokusai''s Les cent paysages du Fuji (Fugaku hyakkei.) This 1835 expansion of Hokusai''s 36 views of Mount Fuji contained more elaborate iterations of his original compositions. The commode features two drawers and four cabriole legs. ... The front of the drawers features a marquetry panel with mountains, unkai (sea of clouds) and usugumo (wisps of clouds) motifs. It is likely from works like Hokusai''s Yama mata yama (Mountains Upon Mountains) that Gallé assimilated the unkai (??) motif. The Yama mata yama is the album''s only zenithal view, allowing this phenomenon which is normally only visible from high elevations. On the top of the commode, a sunset mirage overlooks the entire scene. Meanwhile in the foreground, Gallé has included a usugumo motif rendered in warm brown wood. The wisps of cloud motif originates in a stanza in the Tale of Genji in his mourning for Fujitsubo. Those thin wisps of cloud trailing there over Mountains caught in sunset light Seem to wish to match their hue To the sleeves of the bereaved. There is a distinct temporal quality in the commode''s composition. The left side panel depicts a diurne while the right side panel depicts a nocturne. The juxtaposition of day and night in Japanese ukiyo-e was a subject much beloved by Hokusai and Hiroshige and was termed chuya (chu meaning day and ya meaning night). The Japanese nocturne was clearly a subject of great fascination to Gallé as well as evidenced by his "Nuit Japonais" vase. A similar commode is pictured in: "Gallé Furniture", by Alastair Duncan and Georges de Bartha, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 2012, p. 329, plate 15.

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'Tale of Genji' Commode by Émile Gallé

French "Crabe" Pâte de Verre Vide Poche by Amalric Walter and Henri Bergé

A French "Crab" pâte de verre vide-poche by Amalric Walter and Henri Bergé. The reddish-brown crab, with spots of deep yellow and deep green on its back, sits atop a bed of kelp on an elongated green and yellow dish. A similar vide-poche is pictured in: Amalric Walter (1870-1959), by Keith Cummings, Kingswinford: Broadfield House Glass Museum, 2006, p. 25, cat. no .30.

French 'Crabe' Pâte de Verre Vide Poche by Amalric Walter and Henri Bergé

"Langouste", pâte de verre paperweight by Walter and Bergé.

A French "Langouste" pâte de verre paperweight by Amalric Walter and Henri Bergé. The brown crayfish with red spots straddles a green and yellow curved base. A similar paperweight is pictured in: Amalric Walter (1870-1959), by Keith Cummings, Kingswinford: Broadfield House Glass Museum, 2006, p. 49, cat. no 77c.

'Langouste', pâte de verre paperweight by Walter and Bergé.

Cartier London Mid-20th Century Diamond and Gold ''Coffee Bean'' Brooch

An English Mid-20th Century 18 karat gold "Grain de café" brooch with diamonds by Cartier London. Designed as a cluster coffee bean leaves, highlighted by 4 round brilliant-cut diamonds, approximate total weight .28 carat. Under the direction of Jeanne Toussaint, Cartier first presented this design in the 1930s. It was intended as an homage to Paris'' fabulous café culture and the famous artists, writers and philosophers who infused it with both glamor and intellectual vigor. Grain de café jewels - brooches, necklaces, and earclips - were popular on both sides of the Atlantic well into the 1950s. A favorite design of Hollywood royalty, Grace Kelly was one actor frequently photographed on both casual and formal occasions wearing her own demi-parure of coffee bean necklace and earclips.

Cartier London Mid-20th Century Diamond and Gold ''Coffee Bean'' Brooch

Schlumberger for Tiffany & Co. French Mid-20th Century Lapis Lazuli and Turquoise Cuff Links

A pair of French Mid-20th Century 18 karat gold cuff links with lapis lazuli and turquoise by Jean Schlumberger for Tiffany & Co. The cuff links have a total of 22 cabochon turquoise stones set into the 4 lapis lazuli balls. Made in the Schlumberger Paris workroom. Similar pictured in The Jewels of Jean Schlumberger, by Chantal Bizot, Marie-Noel de Gary, Evelyne Posseme, Preface by Helene David-Weil, Harry N. Abrama, Inc. Publishers, 1995, page 64.

Schlumberger for Tiffany & Co. French Mid-20th Century Lapis Lazuli and Turquoise Cuff Links

Gueridon Table by Louis Majorelle

A French Art Nouveau marble top guéridon by Louis Majorelle. The legs, apron and cross piece of this triangular table are carved with flowers, vines and leaves. Fashioned of marble and carved and molded mahogany, the Chevrefuille guéridon''s sophisticated and dynamic design is enhanced by the sinuous curves of its chevrefuille (honeysuckle) motif. In this piece, Majorelle breathes new life into old tradition.The tabletop is inset with the highest grade rosso di verona marble: white veined orange nodules set within a red matrix. The guéridon''s top, apron, legs and stretcher are carved with chevrefuille (honeysuckle) motif. The two words that make up chevrefoil, chevre (from chevreuil (roe deer)) and feuille (leaf), reveal the vine''s negative connotation within French culture. Chevreuil fauns putatively became intoxicated from the shoots of the chevrefeuille. The chevreuil was so named after the chevre (goat) due to its goat like head. The goat with its nineteenth century evocation of the occult and sexuality only added to the plant''s profanity. The Chevrefuille guéridon refers to Marie de France''s thirteenth century "Chevrefeuille", a French variation of the Tristan Legend. Majorelle had previously created furniture based on the flowers of the Tristan legend, but none so magnificently convey the essence of the story as this guéridon. With the ubiquity of Wagner''s Tri ... stan und Isolde in fin-de-siecle France, contemporary artistic circles would have easily understood the work''s iconography. Isolde had told Tristan that if a chevrefuille (honeysuckle vine) wraps itself around a branch of hazelwood (noisitier), the two could not be separated without killing them both. While lying in wait for Isolde, Tristan carves a line into a hazelwood branch and plants it along her courtly procession: "Belle amie, ainsi en est-il de nous: Ni vous sans moi, ni moi sans vous!" "Beautiful friend so it is with us: neither you without me, or me without you." After the lover''s commit suicide, a hazel entwined by a honeysuckle emerge from their grave despite King Mark''s attempt to exterminate them. Despite the illicit nature of the lover''s affair, the couple never consummate, thus maintaining Isolde''s virginity. The honeysuckle''s deforms the hazel tree, minimizing its utility. Through the form of the table and the honeysuckle''s iconographic meaning, Majorelle creates drama between the sacred and the profane. The form of the guéridon evokes the architecture of the gothic church, from the reuleaux shape of the tabletop to the y-shaped dome of the stretcher. The honeysuckle twists about the table without corrupting the table''s divine form, thereby creating the purity of the union in death. This message was communicated in "Liebestod", the climactic end of Tristan und Isolde that literally means love-death. A similar gueridon appears in "Majorelle - Nancy: décorations d''intérieurs: meubles, tentures, bronzes, ferronneries" (the 1906 Majorelle catalogue).

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Gueridon Table by Louis Majorelle

Cartier Paris Mid-20th Century Gold ''Coffee Bean'' Earrings

A pair of French Mid-20th Century 18 karat gold "Grain de Café" earrings by Cartier. Each highly three dimensional earring is composed of ribbed coffee bean motifs arranged in a stylized floral form. With a signed Cartier Box. Under the direction of Jeanne Toussaint, Cartier first presented this design in the 1930s. It was intended as an homage to Paris'' fabulous café culture and the famous artists, writers and philosophers who infused it with both glamor and intellectual vigor. Grain de café jewels - brooches, necklaces, and earclips - were popular on both sides of the Atlantic well into the 1950s. A favorite design of Hollywood royalty, Grace Kelly was one actor frequently photographed on both casual and formal occasions wearing her own demi-parure of coffee bean necklace and earclips.

Cartier Paris Mid-20th Century Gold ''Coffee Bean'' Earrings

Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase with Serpents by Ernest Leveillé

An Art Nouveau cameo glass vase by Ernest Leveillé for Escalier de Cristal, with two wheel carved red serpents in high relief intertwined around the outer surface. The background glass has a moss-like texture trapped within the vessel. The vase sits within a bronze mount at the bottom. The style of the background glass is the same as in many of his sophisticated pieces and the technique is the same as in many of his hand carved (wheel-carved) glass vases. The vase was retailed by Escalier de Cristal of Paris, one of the great proponents of Art Nouveau at the turn of the 20th century.

Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase with Serpents by Ernest Leveillé

French Art Nouveau Dragonfly Table by Émile Gallé.

A French Art Nouveau two tiered table by Émile Gallé. The table''s four legs are the carved bodies of dragonflies, their wings outstretched and frozen mid-flight. The table top rests on the dragonflies'' heads and wings, with a fluid curvature in the corners creating a crown for the winged creatures'' heads. Marquetry on the table top depicts flowers on long-leafed stems, with shadows of foliage in the background. Decoration in darker tones and larger, starker motifs, decorate the lower tier, playing on the shadows in which it is naturally shrouded. The dragonfly works of Gallé''s provoked very strong critical reaction when they were debuted in 1900, with champions of Art Nouveau lauding the modernity of the dragonfly as caryatid, while detractors were horrified by the very idea of insects as table legs. Time has certainly found favor with this design, as it has found pride of place in museum collections worldwide. A similar table is pictured in: "Gallé Furniture," by Alastair Duncan and Georges de Bartha, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 2012, p. 207, plate 192a.

French Art Nouveau Dragonfly Table by Émile Gallé.

Loïe Fuller" Lithograph by Orazi

A French "Théâtre de Loïe Fuller" lithograph by Manuel Orazi. The poster depicts the dancer Loïe Fuller with flowing red hair and her signature billowing costume, surrounded by stylized flowers. Realistically-drawn flowers descend from the poster title. The artist''s insignia appears on the lower right of the image. A similar poster is pictured in:" Loïe Fuller: Magician of Light," Exhibition at the Virginia Museum, March 12-April 22, 1979, Richmond: The Virginia Museum, 1979, p. 76; and in: "The Kogod Collection," E. Greenwich, RI: Meridian Printing, 2004, p. 242.

 Loïe Fuller' Lithograph by Orazi

French Art Nouveau Vitrine by Emile Gallé

A French Art Nouveau "le cerisier" (cherry tree) vitrine by Emile Gallé featuring marquetry and carving throughout with original stylized fleur-de-lys brass shelf rests. The interior back of the vitrine is highly decorated with beautiful floral marquetry. This unusual piece was originally electrified when manufactured. Circa 1915. This unusual piece was originally electrified when manufactured. The beginning of Gallé''s fascination with Japanese art can be traced back to his friendship with Hokkai Takashima (1850-1931), a Japanese nobleman, fellow botanist and member of the École de Nancy. Takashima introduced Gallé to a mesmerizing world of Japanese woodblock prints and textile designs, which he frequently incorporated into his work. Gallé''s early success at the 1900 Paris Exposition Universelle was with his "Japonisante" vitrine, a piece that featured "cherry blossom" openwork. In Gallé''s personal life, the cherry blossom held sentimental value, reminding him of his trips to Saillon, Switzerland. In his journal, Gallé mused "the cherries ripen in the snow falling from the dandelions." The gentle dark wood ripples in the marquetry evoke alpine mist and clouds taking the viewer to this enchanting scene. A similar vitrine is pictured in: "Gallé Furniture," by Alastair Duncan and Georges de Bartha, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 2012, p. 295, plate 17.

French Art Nouveau Vitrine by Emile Gallé

A French Art Nouveau Wooden Pedestal by Emile Gallé

A French Art Nouveau two-tiered square pedestal with carved and marquetry decoration by Emile Gallé. The pedestal has two marquetry shelves depicting leaves. Its four sinuous legs are enhanced with carved arch supports. A similar selette is pictured in: "Gallé Furniture," by Alastair Duncan and Georges de Bartha, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 2012, p. 253, plate 18.

A French Art Nouveau Wooden Pedestal by Emile Gallé

French Art Nouveau silver and plique-à-jour enamel coupe d''ornement by Eugène Feuillâtre

A French Art Nouveau silver and plique-à-jour enamel coupe d''ornement by Eugène Feuillâtre. This exceptional compote features delicate and stylized floral patterns on the upper and lower portions. Green leaves encircle the base of the piece and the sinewy stem of the petite cup appears to grow out of the foliage below, and a spray of pink flowers blooms at the top of the compote. Feuillâtre complimented the deeply rooted organic motifs of his quintessentially Art Nouveau compote by adorning the piece with small green enamel buds on the top and bottom of the stem. This compote is particularly remarkable because it is made almost entirely of plique-à-jour enamel. Eugene Feuillâtre (1870-1916) was a sculptor, enamelist, silversmith and jeweler. He worked for Lalique at the end of the 19th century and established his own firm in 1899, specializing in plique-à-jour decorated objects. He also perfected the technique of enameling on silver and platinum. Provenance: the Collection of Joseph R. Ritman. A nearly identical coupe d''ornement resides in the Musee D''Orsay in Paris.

French Art Nouveau silver and plique-à-jour enamel coupe d''ornement by Eugène Feuillâtre

"Winter Scene" Glass Vase by Daum.

A French Art Nouveau "Winter Scene" cameo glass vase by Daum Nancy. A group of bare trees in the foreground sit on snowy ground under a yellow and orange sky. A larger group of bare trees are in the background. PROVENANCE: From an Unreserved Texas Estate. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: Daum Frères: Maîtres Verriers, 1892-1935, by Katharina Büttiker-Weber, Zurich: Galerie Katharina Büttiker, 1986, cat. no 27.

'Winter Scene' Glass Vase by Daum.

"Aux Nénuphars" Two-Tier Table by Majorelle

Table Aux Nénuphars – A French Art Nouveau two-tier mahogany, tamarind wood and gilt bronze table by Louis Majorelle in the "water lily" motif, featuring applied bronze lily pad and vine decoration. The organic shape and rounded dip in each of the table''s two tiered planes mimics the appearance of a water lily suspended in water, creating a beautiful cohesion in the design. Known as the master furniture maker of the Art Nouveau style, Louis Majorelle was the recipient of the Grand Prize at the St. Louis World''s Fair, and international acclaim at the Paris Exposition Universelle of 1900. He remains among the most sought after designers of the early 20th century, and the most celebrated of the Nancy Art Nouveau artists. Those works by Majorelle that feature gilt bronze accents, produced by his team of highly skilled craftsman with the utmost attention to detail, are considered the most exceptional of the artist''s oeuvre, and are among the most collectible. A similar table is pictured in: "The Paris Salons 1895-1915, Vol. III: Furniture", by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1996, p. 382, and in: "Majorelle - Nancy: décorations d''intérieurs: meubles, tentures, bronzes, ferronneries" (the 1906 Majorelle catalogue) -- see Cabinet de Travail "Nénuphars".

 'Aux Nénuphars' Two-Tier Table by Majorelle

French Art Nouveau "Winter Landscape" Vase by Daum Nancy

A French Art Nouveau "Winter Landscape" vase with an inverted lip, by Daum Nancy. The etched and enameled glass vase depicts trees in a barren meadow, a forested background against an amber and orange sky. PROVENANCE: From an Unreserved Texas Estate. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: Daum Frères: Maîtres Verriers, 1892-1935, by Katharina Büttiker-Weber, Zurich: Galerie Katharina Büttiker, 1986, cat. no 27.

French Art Nouveau 'Winter Landscape' Vase by Daum Nancy

French Art Nouveau Vitrine by Emile Gallé

A French carved and fruitwood marquetry inlaid Ombelliféres vitrine by Emile Gallé. The vitrine has marquetry ombelle flowers in its interior and on the panel below the bottom shelf. The interior has two small carved half shelves. The top and bottom have elaborately carved ombelle decorations. It sits on four sinuously carved feet. The vitrine''s front marquetry panel features three Berce des prés composed in a similar manner to Kitao Shigemasa''s Tree peony and Finch. Through Takashima Hokkai, Gallé was able to borrow a copy of Fleurs, oiseaux par Shigemasa (Kachoe shashin zue). Like Shigemasa, Gallé worked in the aesthetic of kacho-e (birds and flower painting) with a thorough understanding of the grammar of ikebana (flower arrangement). Gallé''s expertise was so great that he was entrusted with organizing an ikebana retrospective for the 1900 Exposition Universelle. Ikebana is composed of three elements: shin (heaven, sun, male), soe (earth, female), and hikae/tai (humanity, child.) Gallé has arranged his flowers according to the Moribana school, a style of ikebana that came at the apex of the Meiji restoration. Shigemasa had his peonies according to Moribana principles: the right most "soe" flower leans at 45°, the middle "shin" flower at 10° and the leftmost "hikae" flower at 75°. Pivotal to ikebana is the principles of harmony and balance. It is the function of the 4 ... 5° soe flower through angle to balance out the 75° hikae flower. While Gallé did not follow the rigid rules of Moribana, this should not be seen as an indication of inferiority. Rather, Gallé has merely solved the problem of balance in a different manner. While Shigemasa created a sense of balance through angle, Gallé made rendered the leftmost flower in madagascar ebony . The dark value serves as a visual weight, balancing an arrangement that otherwise approaches imbalance. Next to the Berce des prés is an Écaille martre (Tiger moth). Native to the same prairies as the Berce des prés, the inclusion of the Écaille martre gives the vitrine the crepuscular setting that Gallé loved so much. Literature: Alastair Duncan and Georges de Bartha, "Gallé Furniture," Woodbridge, Antique Collector''s Club, 2012, p. 307, pl.42, for a similar example.

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French Art Nouveau Vitrine by Emile Gallé

A French Art Nouveau Marquetry Vase by Émile Gallé

A French Art Nouveau marquetry vase by Émile Gallé. The vase features crocus flowers in hues of orange and purple against a cream ground with stripes in pink and red. The vase is accented with an applied band of tendrils backed by silver foil inclusions. A similar vase is pictured in: Émile Gallé et le Verre, la Collection du musée de l''École de Nancy, Parks: Somogy editions d''art, 2004, p. 137, ca. not. 222.

A French Art Nouveau Marquetry Vase by Émile Gallé

French Art Nouveau Glass Vase by Émile Gallé,

A French Art Nouveau carved cameo glass vase by Émile Gallé, decorated with oak leaves and a staghorn beetle.. On a background that changes gradually from pale yellow to pale orange, a brown staghorn beetle climbs a brown branch toward green leaves. A similar vase is pictured in: Émile Gallé, by Philippe Garner, London: Academy Editions, 1976, p. 112.

French Art Nouveau Glass Vase by Émile Gallé,

Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

A French Art Nouveau cameo glass vase by Daum, featuring a scene of red blooming flowers on an opaque white martelé ground. The flowers, which have dark centers, are suspended from dark curving stems that emerge from dark green carved leaves. Pictured in Glass, Art Nouveau to Art Deco, by Victor Arwass, page 83. Art Nouveau, the French Aesthetic,by Victor Arwas, page 506.

Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

French Armchairs by Louis Majorelle

A pair of French Art Nouveau "Pommes de Pin" armchairs by Louis Majorelle. The chairs have meticulous carving of pine cones on their arms, legs and backs, as well as on the seat apron.They are upholstered in a rich green velour. Similar armchairs are pictured in: "Majorelle - Nancy: décorations d''intérieurs: meubles, tentures, bronzes, ferronnerie"s (the 1906 Majorelle catalogue) (Salon "Pommes de Pins").

French Armchairs by Louis Majorelle

"Irises" French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Burgun & Schverer

A French Art Nouveau "Irises" cameo glass vase by Burgun & Schverer with intercalaire decoration of lavender irises with green stems on a carved brilliant rose colored ground.

'Irises' French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Burgun & Schverer

Van Cleef & Arpels Paris Late-20th Century Diamond Sapphire and Platinum ''Camilia'' Earrings

A pair of Mid-20th Century platinum "Camélia" earrings with diamonds and blue sapphires by Van Cleef & Arpels. The camellia flower earrings set with 36 sapphires, approximate total weight of 3.60 carats, and 86 round diamonds with an approximate total weight of 3.90 carats, F-G color, VVS-VS clarity. Made in France, sold at Van Cleef & Arpels, New York. These striking flower earrings with highly three dimensional shaping are a modern interpretation of the iconic Asian flower which had so captured the European imagination in the 20th century, According to Évelyne Possémé, head curator at the Musée des Arts Decoratifs, Paris, "At the same time as the Indian influence, a rather more classical vein was still found in earrings such as the Camellia clips, leaves composed of bead and prong-set rubies (and sapphires) and diamonds," Earclips of the same design as these, with rubies and diamonds, are pictured in Van Cleef & Arpels: L''Art De La Haute Joaillerie, by Évelyne Possémé, Les Arts Decoratifs, 2013, page 187.

Van Cleef & Arpels Paris Late-20th Century Diamond Sapphire and Platinum ''Camilia'' Earrings

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass by Émile Gallé

A French Art Nouveau cameo glass vase by Émile Gallé. The carved blooming flowers are painted in reds and whites, with green accents. Some of the carved stems are also painted, in reds and greens.

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass by Émile Gallé

French Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

A French cameo glass vase by Daum. The vase, with martelé background, has red wheel-carved lily flowers rising on green stems from its carved green base. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: Daum Nancy III: Daum Frères – Verreries de Nancy, 1880-1930, by Katharina Büttiker, Zurich: Galerie Katharina Büttiker, 2009, pp. 52-53.

French Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

Tiffany Studios Scarab and Mosaic Box

A Tiffany Studios New York "Scarab" mosaic and gilt bronze covered box. This round box is decorated with vivid mosaics of red, yellow, orange, green, turquoise blue and black. The cover has three applied favrile glass scarab beetles. The scarabs confirm Tiffany''s fascination for Egyptian archeological discoveries and are a fine expression of his inspiration. Louis Comfort Tiffany first traveled to Egypt in 1872, two years after the opening of the Suez Canal and near the height of the ensuing American "Eyptomania." Tiffany was immediately taken with the ancient cultural legacies and starkly exotic landscape of 19th Century Egypt, and upon his return to New York he devoted himself to the rendering of several large scale oil paintings depicting the landscape, ancient wonders and then modern architecture of Cairo and the surrounding area. From that point onward the aesthetic language of ancient Egypt was never far from Tiffany''s mind, and it would appear in various motif forms in various works for the rest of his artistic career. Those works that demonstrate Tiffany''s great passion and careful study of ancient Egypt are now considered among the rarest and most collectible of his oeuvre. After a second Nile River Cruise in 1908 Tiffany resolved to celebrate his long enchantment with all things Egyptian with a Fete that would be written about for decades to come. Invitatio ... ns to the strictly Egyptian-themed evening were on aged parchment in both hieroglyphs and English, and hand delivered to each of the bash''s 400 guests. Each of the attendees had to submit their costumes to astrict guidelines of authenticity overseen by a committee comprised of Egyptologists and authorities on costume art. Egyptian-inspired music, composed by Theodore Steinway, was performed by the New York Philharmonic Orchestra as Pedro de Cordoba, playing Marc Antony, brought gifts of Favrile glass to a posing Cleopatra. Tiffany''s sons-in-law were dressed as Roman lictors, while his daughters were adorned with rare scarab objects from Tiffany''s personal collection, fashioned as jewelry. Robert De Forest, the famed president of the Metropolitan Museum of American Art, arrived as the one of the Maharajas of Punjab; John D. Rockefeller attended dressed as a pharaoh and Egyptian beauty queens wearing gigantic scarab wings served them North African fare. Tiffany spared no detail and no expense to recreate the opulence of ancient Egyptian courts, and created many decorative arts especially for the occasion. Tiffany was particularly interested in the importance of the scarab beetle in Egyptian mythology, and sparingly employed decorative depictions of the insect in his works, most probably due to his understanding of the supreme and sacred nature of the motif. However, those works that did include scarabs executed in the ancient Egyptian style are considered of special personal importance to Tiffany, and are especially important to find in Tiffany collections. The Egyptian name for the beetle is derived from the verb "to be created" or "to come into the world." The Egyptians considered the beetle to be the incarnation of the creator god, who had regenerated himself cyclically. The beetle was thus understood as a potent symbol of rebirth, and was tied to understandings of the daily rising sun. A similar mosaic box is pictured in: Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models, by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988 p. 433, plate 1716; and in: Louis C. Tiffany: The Garden Museum Collection, by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 2004, p. 370.

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Tiffany Studios Scarab and Mosaic Box

French Glass Vase by Daum

A French enameled and etched glass vase with applied handles by Daum. The vase has a pink martelé background. There is carving on the dark green footed base. It is decorated with lighter green wheel-carved flowers and vines. Additional wheel-carved vines hang from the rim.

French Glass Vase by Daum

Art Nouveau Pâte de Verre Plaque by Amalric Walter

A French Art Nouveau pâte de verre "Crab" plaque by Amalric Walter. The red-brown crab, which has green and yellow accents on its shell and claws, sits on a mottled pale gray background. It is surrounded by red seaweed and yellow seashells.

Art Nouveau Pâte de Verre Plaque by Amalric Walter

Tiffany Studios Covered Box

An Art Nouveau enamel covered box by Louis Comfort Tiffany. The intricate design features vines with tendrils culminating in paisleys, almost replicating a Henna pattern. It is an example of Indian patterns that influenced Tiffany''s work. In the late 1870''s Tiffany''s partnership with Lockwood de Forest resulted in an introduction of East Indian craft motifs that contributed to their revival within the context of Gilded Age America. This covered box is an example of such influence, with its gold background and highlights of blue enamel paisleys. Several pieces of Tiffany''s enamelware are marked with a four-digit number preceded by an "S." Since there are only a handful of such objects available, it may be that Tiffany designed them for himself, or to fulfill special commissions. The Tiffany & Co. archives contains many drawings marked "S.O." for items sold as commissioned. Perhaps "S" was Louis Tiffany''s way of identifying those earmarked for an exhibition, a special client, or himself. A similar jar is featured in: "The Jewelry and Enamels of Louis Comfort Tiffany," by Janet Zapata, p. 69.

Tiffany Studios Covered Box

Art Nouveau Pâte de Verre Plaque by Amalric Walter

A French Art Nouveau pâte de verre "Langouste" plaque by Amalric Walter. This six-sided plaque shows a green lobster surrounded by yellow seaweed and shells, on a pale background.

Art Nouveau Pâte de Verre Plaque by Amalric Walter

French Art Nouveau Vase, "Eucalyptus," by Gabriel Argy-Rousseau

A French Art Nouveau pâte de verre vase, "Eucalyptus," by Gabriel Argy-Rousseau. The vase has three isolated brown branches, each with curving purple and green leaves, and flower buds, also in purple and green, in relief. Provenance: Mr. Kenneth W. Davis, Fort Worth, Texas. An example of this vase is pictured in: G. Argy Rousseau: Glassware as Art, by Janine Bloch-Dermant, London: Thames and Hudson, Ltd., 1991, p. 180, cat. no 19.06.

French Art Nouveau Vase, 'Eucalyptus,' by Gabriel Argy-Rousseau

Walter and Bergé Pâte de Verre Lizards Tray

A French Art Nouveau pâte de verre tray by Amalric Walter. This tray is decorated with a spotted green lizard lying on the outer rim of the yellow dish. A similar dish is pictured in: Amalric Walter (1870-1959), by Keith Cummings, Kingswinford: Broadfield House Glass Museum, 2006, p. 19, plate 16.

Walter and  Bergé  Pâte de Verre Lizards Tray

French Art Nouveau ''Fleurs de Pommier'' Cameo Glass Vase by Émile Gallé.

A French Art Nouveau ''Fleurs de pommier'' cameo glass vase by Émile Gallé. This ovular vase features crimson leaves and crisp red apple blossoms on a gold ground. The flora are rendered in slightly translucent glass, which makes a remarkable contrast against the opaque ground. Gallé had a remarkable ability to convey feeling and time in his work. With a static sky and vividly warm color, this vase has the essence of a summer sunset. A similar vase is pictured in: Glass by Gallé, by Alastair Duncan and Georges de Bartha, New York: Harry N. Abrams, Inc., 1984, p. 195, plate 295.

French Art Nouveau ''Fleurs de Pommier'' Cameo Glass Vase by Émile Gallé.

"Spiders and Brambles" Cameo Glass Vase by Gabriel Argy-Rousseau

A French "Spiders and Brambles" cameo glass vase by Gabriel Argy-Rousseau. The vase features entwined pink, green, and brown bramble leaves. The mottled white glass ground is dominated by a bas relief white spider web, giving the visual effect of a floating gossamer on the vase. A spindly black spider sits in the center of the web. A similar vase is pictured in "G. Argy-Rousseau Glassware As Art," by Janine Bloch-Dermant, in the catalog raisonne section pg. 181, figure 20.05.

'Spiders and Brambles' Cameo Glass Vase by Gabriel Argy-Rousseau

Art Nouveau Paperweight crab by Amalric Walter

A French Art Nouveau "Crabe" pâte de verre paperweight by Amalric Walter and Henri Bergé, decorated with a relief of a reddish-brown crab poised upon a bright contrast of green and yellow algae. A similar paperweight is pictured in: Amalric Walter (1870-1959), by Keith Cummings, Kingswinford: Broadfield House Glass Museum, 2006, p. 43, cat. no. 63b.

Art Nouveau Paperweight crab by Amalric Walter

French Pate de Verre Vase by Gabriel Argy-Rousseau

A French Art Deco pâte-de-verre glass vase, "Lions," by Gabriel Argy-Rousseau, depicting a series of three mottled brown roaring lions in various running poses against a mottled cream ground. The lions are surrounded by cream colored calla lily flowers above them and red fern fronds below. Pictured in "Les Pâtes de Verre, Catalogue Raisonne", G.Argy-Rousseau, by Janine Bloch-Dermant, p. 78 and p. 209, cat. no. 26.08.

French Pate de Verre Vase by Gabriel Argy-Rousseau

Art Nouveau Enameled and Etched Glass Vase by Daum

A French Art Nouveau enameled and etched "Fleurs et Abeilles" glass vase by Daum. This vase is features a shape which Daum used because it lends itself to undulating and soft nature scenes. This bright vase is dominated by two planes of mottled glass, golden yellow on top of deep purple, which together create a landscape scene. The vase is decorated with etched and enameled flowers. The flora seem to grow from the base of the vase because of the landscape effect achieved in the ground behind the scene. At the base, the leaves and stems of the flowers appear as shadows, as they are only etched into the dark ground. Once the flora break through into the golden section of the vase, the etched scene is enhanced by bright, verdant green enamel, which gives way to vibrant red orchids. The scene is completed by a curious bee floating up to the blossom, ready to pollinate it. The presence of the bee implies that this springtime scene is not entirely completed in the vase, but that it is rather just a part of a fleeting moment rendered in glass. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: Daum: Maitres Verriers, 1890-1980, by Noël Daum, Lausanne: Edita Denoël, 1980, p. 122.

Art Nouveau Enameled and Etched Glass Vase by Daum

French Art Nouveau Cylindrical Snail Vase by Daum

A French Art Nouveau "Vigne et Escargots" vase by Daum. The vase features grape clusters, vines and leaves in low relief with an an applied snail on one of the upper leaves, all against a mottled amber, pink, red, plum and white glass ground. Some of the grapes are also applied to to heighten the natural effects of the grape clusters. The scene is loosely landscape-based, with roots at the bottom and vines hanging down from the top, but the complex composition makes the piece entirely surreal. During the Art Nouveau period artists frequently used scenes from nature to convey human emotion, and vice versa. This autumnal piece is dark and mysterious, with gnarls, roots, and snails slithering on it. The motifs, patterns, and textures on the vase imply a time of transience, like the changing of the seasons. The "Vigne et Escargots" vase was produced in five layers beginning with a colorless glass core. The top two thirds of the intercalaire layer is colored with sulfure de cadmium inclusions and the bottom third is powdered with améthyste inclusions. After being cased with colorless glass, the glass was colored with translucent white inclusions in the top two thirds of the vase and améthyste in the bottom two thirds. Cirrus clouds at sunset were created with améthyste inclusions sprinkled atop burgundy inclusions. The base features a spattering of opaque verte de paris in ... clusions. To create a soot-like atmosphere, bistre inclusions were sprinkled about the grapes. The final layer consists of burgundy inclusions in the top third and améthyste, opaque verte de paris, and translucent white inclusions in the bottom two thirds. The vase was subsequently blown into an inverted baluster form with an undulating trefoil mouth and a splayed thick concave firing foot. In the constriction between the body and foot, the body was twisted counter-clockwise, while the constriction between body and neck was twisted clockwise. The striation created by the twisting of the intercalated layers create a sense of rising air. The bodies of the burgundy snails were subsequently created with drawn out upper and lower tentacles and fused with yellow powdered glass. For the snails'' shells, a core of colorless glass was coated in light gray-brown, dark gray-brown and black powdered glass and cased in another layer of colorless glass. The snail shells were fused to the body using this very powdered glass mixture. After the design was painted in wax upon the vase, the background and snails were acid-etched, allowing the intercalated layers to show through and the snails to be given a frosted appearance. The grape vine design and snails were subsequently hand carved, taking care to detail the snail shell''s bands. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: Daum Frères: Maîtres Verriers, 1892-1935, by Katharina Büttiker-Weber, Zurich: Galerie Katharina Büttiker, 1986, cat. no. 79.

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French Art Nouveau Cylindrical Snail Vase by Daum

French Art Nouveau Pâte-de-Verre Vide-Poche by Walter

A French "Chameleon" pâte de verre vide-poche by Amalric Walter. This piece features an intricately textured green chameleon sitting on the edge of a yellow and orange dish. A similar vide-poche is pictured in: Amalric Walter (1870-1959), by Keith Cummings, Kingswinford: Broadfield House Glass Museum, 2006, p. 23, cat. no. 24.

French Art Nouveau Pâte-de-Verre Vide-Poche by Walter

French Art Nouveau "Pivoines" Table Lamp by Émile Gallé

A French Art Nouveau "Pivoines" table lamp by Émile Gallé. The lamp features a vibrant detailed decoration of crimson red peonies wrapped around the base and shade, surrounded by foliage of plum-colored leaves. The patinated bronze mounts replicate the foliage theme and have scarab beetle terminals. A similar lamp is pictured in A. Duncan, G. de Bartha, "Gallé Le Verre," London, 1984, p. 153, pl. 214.

French Art Nouveau 'Pivoines' Table Lamp by Émile Gallé

French Art Nouveau "Nénuphars" Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

A French Art Nouveau "Nénuphars" cameo glass vase by Daum. The opalescent body of the vase features wheel-carved orange and brown water lilies in varied states of maturity against a blue martelé ground.

French Art Nouveau 'Nénuphars' Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

Art Nouveau Enameled and Etched Glass Vase by Daum

A French Art Nouveau enameled and etched glass vase by Daum. This vase is a shape which Daum used because it lends itself to undulating and soft nature scenes. This bright vase is dominated by two planes of mottled glass, golden yellow on top of deep purple, which together create a landscape scene. The vase is decorated with etched and enameled flowers. The flora seem to grow from the base of the vase because of the landscape effect achieved in the ground behind the scene. At the base, the leaves and stems of the flowers appear as shadows, as they are only etched into the dark ground. Once the flora break through into the golden section of the vase, the etched scene is enhanced by bright, verdant green enamel, which gives way to vibrant red flowers. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: Daum: Maitres Verriers, 1890-1980, by Noël Daum, Lausanne: Edita Denoël, 1980, p. 122.

Art Nouveau Enameled and Etched Glass Vase by Daum

French Art Deco Pâte-de-Verre Glass Vase by Gabriel Argy-Rousseau

A French Art Deco pâte-de-verre vase, "Le Jardin des Hespérides (Garden of the Hesperides)," by Gabriel Argy-Rousseau, depicting three women in various poses picking apples from a tree. The women are in red; the apples are vibrant red. All are on a pale ground. Each woman picks from a tree with a brown trunk. The lower portion of the vase is darker red, resembling a floor, with a Greek key motif. Pictured in: "G. Argy-Rousseau: Les Pâtes de Verres", catalogue raisonné by Janine Bloch-Dermant (Paris: Les Editions de l''Amateur, 1990), pages 72-73 & 208, cat. no. 26.01; color pictures in: "G. Argy-Rousseau: Glassware as Art" by Janine Bloch-Dermant, New York, Thames and Hudson, Inc., 1991, pages 72-73. Bloch-Dermant describes this vase as "a hymn to nature," and "a masterpiece... outside of time." She adds that it is "a reference to Greece," from which Argy-Rousseau "inherited his feeling for nature." Bloch-Dermant cites Attic vases of the fifth century B.C., or the tragicomic theme of Greek masks as influences. "(G. Argy-Rousseau: Glassware as Art" by Janine Bloch-Dermant, New York, Thames and Hudson, Inc., 1991, pages 35, 41, 66).

French Art Deco Pâte-de-Verre Glass Vase by Gabriel Argy-Rousseau

"Langouste," pâte de verre vide-poche by Walter and Bergé.

A French Art Nouveau pâte de verre vide-poche by Amalric Walter and Henri Bergé. This piece features a brown "Langouste" resting on a blue-green shaped dish. A similar vide-poche is pictured in: Amalric Walter (1870-1959), by Keith Cummings, Kingswinford: Broadfield House Glass Museum, 2006, p. 24, cat. no. 28b.

'Langouste,' pâte de verre vide-poche by Walter and Bergé.

"Papillon" Bowl by Gabriel Argy-Rousseau

A French Art Nouveau pâte de verre "Papillon" bowl by Gabriel Argy-Rousseau. The bowl has three Luna moths with brown bodies and textured green wings with red spots. They sit just below the bowl''s rim in a background of mottled purple and pink, fading to opalescence. A similar bowl is pictured in: "G. Argy Rousseau: Glassware as Art, by Janine Bloch-Dermant, London: Thames and Hudson, Ltd., 1991, p. 178, cat. no. 15.01.

'Papillon' Bowl by Gabriel Argy-Rousseau

"Fruit Branch" Vase by Emile Gallé

A French Art Nouveau mold blown cameo glass "Plum" vase by Emile Gallé. The applied blue and yellowish burgundy fruits rest on brown leaves, all on a yellow ground. A similar vase is pictured in: "Glass by Gallé," by Alastair Duncan and Georges de Bartha, New York: Harry N. Abrams, Inc., 1984, p. 196, plate 298.

'Fruit Branch' Vase by Emile Gallé

Art Nouveau pâte de verre "Masques" Vase by Gabriel Argy-Rousseau

A French Art Nouveau pâte de verre "Masques" vase by Gabriel Argy-Rousseau. The vase is decorated with two red masks that are framed in purple and green leaves. Provenance: Christie''s, New York, Important 20th Century Decorative Arts Including Works by Tiffany Studios, 13 June 2002, lot 39. A similar vase is pictured in J. Bloch-Dermont, Les Pâtes de Verre G. Argy-Rousseau Catalogue Raisonné, Paris, 1990, p. 178, no. 14.06.

Art Nouveau pâte de verre 'Masques' Vase by Gabriel Argy-Rousseau

"Grapevine" Cameo Glass vase by Émile Gallé

A French Art Nouveau "Grapevine blowout" cameo glass vase by Émile Gallé. The vase is decorated with gray-violet grapes hanging from red vines which are surrounded by dark red-brown foliage. The background is opalescent cream.

'Grapevine' Cameo Glass vase by Émile Gallé

Bronze Humidor by Tiffany Studios New York

A patinated bronze humidor by Tiffany Studios New York with cedar lining and interior cover with bronze knob. The top edge of the humidor is decorated with stylized flowers. The body has textured bumps all around. The top of the humidor has a sculpted design reminiscent of a volcanic crater. Volcanos were a central leitmotif throughout Tiffany''s oeuvre. In 1870, a 22-year-old Tiffany and the eminent Hudson River School painter Robert Swain Gifford visited Pompeii. While excavations had begun well over a century earlier, they were still mostly incomplete. The city''s dramatic history and the looming reminder of Vesuvius''s destructive potential stirred the romantic passions of 19th-century painters. The volcano reprised itself in Tiffany Studios'' largest mosaic commission, the crystal curtain at Palacio de Bellas Artes in Mexico City. The mosaic depicted the everlasting snows of Popocatepetl and Ixtaccihuatl, the extinct volcanoes that look down upon the valley of that city. Flowers blanket the volcanoes. Similarly, in the "Volcano humidor," the top edge of the humidor is decorated with stylized flowers, perhaps evoking the renewal of life after a volcanic eruption. An identical humidor belongs to the collection of Edgar Kauffman, Jr. at Frank Lloyd Wright''s Fallingwater. Fallingwater was home to an exclusively Japanese and Japonisme collection. Kauffman chose the ... humidor for its Japanese- inspired metalwork and design. A similar humidor is pictured in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988, p. 450, plate 1793; and in: "Louis Comfort Tiffany at Tiffany & Co.," by John Loring, New York: Harry N. Abrams, Inc., 2002, p. 238, "Louis Comfort Tiffany: Treasures from the Driehaus Collection," by David A. Hanks, Richard H. Driehaus, Richard H. Driehaus Museum, The Monacelli Press, LLC, 2013, p. 164 fig. 55

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Bronze Humidor by Tiffany Studios New York

Art Nouveau Vase "Lyciet de Barbarie" by Argy-Rousseau

A French "Lyciet de Barbarie", pâte de verre vase by Gabriel Argy-Rousseau, depicting pink wolf berries suspended from brown stems, with green leaves, all against a vignette ground of amber, honey and white. cf. J. Bloch-Dermont, Les Pâtes de Verre G. Argy-Rousseau Catalogue Raisonné, Paris, 1990, p. 179, no. 17.01 for another vase of this model.

Art Nouveau Vase 'Lyciet de Barbarie' by Argy-Rousseau

Art Nouveau "Crabe" Vide Poche by Amalric Walter

A French Art Deco pâte de verre vide poche by Amalric Walter and Henri Bergé. The tray features a black and brown crab with yellow highlights against a blue and yellow mottled background. The hexagonal form and radiating lines out of the crab''s back plant this piece firmly in the Art Deco aesthetic of geometry and symmetry. A similar dish is pictured in: "Amalric Walter (1870-1959)", by Keith Cummings, Kingswinford: Broadfield House Glass Museum, 2006, p. 18, plate 13.

Art Nouveau 'Crabe' Vide Poche by Amalric Walter

"Langouste", pâte de verre paperweight by Walter and Bergé.

A French Art Nouveau pâte de verre paperweight (presse papiers) by Amalric Walter and Henri Bergé. The paperweight has a brown "Langouste" resting on a sculpted pâte de verre base. There is great detail in the claws and the sections of the tail. A similar paperweight is pictured in: Amalric Walter (1870-1959), by Keith Cummings, Kingswinford: Broadfield House Glass Museum, 2006, p. 49, cat. no. 77c.

'Langouste', pâte de verre paperweight by Walter and Bergé.

Gold Ring with Diamonds and Emeralds by Marchak

A French Mid-20th Century 18 karat gold ring with diamonds and emeralds by Marchak. The leaves of this ring are framed with 81 round-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of 5.10 carats with a VS clarity and G/H color grade. The leaves center on 4 oval cabochon emeralds with an approximate total weight of 20.20 carats. Ring size 6-1/2. With original drawing. Born in 1854 in a poverty-stricken area of Kiev, Joseph Marchak sold his own clothing at age 10 to pay the fees associated with becoming a jeweler''s apprentice. Fourteen years after beginning that apprenticeship, Marchak used the dowry from his young bride to open his own small shop in the neighborhood in which he was born. Within a year, he had upgraded to a full maison on the Kreshchatyk, Kiev''s main street of luxury retail. Marchak quickly drew the attention of Tsar Nicholas II, who traveled to Kiev to have Marchak design gifts to be given to his family celebrating the 300th anniversary of the Romanov dynasty. Seemingly overnight, Marchak had become the most highly sought-after and highly celebrated luxury maker in Russia, easily rivaling even Fabergé. But Marchak was also widely recognized abroad, winning a prestigious medal at the World''s Fair in Chicago in 1893, and another in Antwerp in 1894. Dubbed the "Cartier of Kiev," Marchak, his family and his workshop fled Russia at the outset of World War I and ... landed in Paris, where they established another successful workshop and storefront on the Rue de la Paix. The Marchak family continued to make exquisite and highly stylized treasure that defied commonplace trends well through the mid 20th Century.

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Gold Ring with Diamonds and Emeralds by Marchak

Van Cleef & Arpels Mid-20th Century Diamond Sapphire and Platinum ''Camilla'' Brooch

A Mid-20th Century platinum brooch with diamonds and blue sapphires by Van Cleef & Arpels. The "Camellia" brooch has 113 round-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of 10.00 carats, G/H color, VS clarity, and 40 round & oval-cut sapphires with an approximate total weight of 22.00 carats. The sapphires are most likely of Burma origin. "At the same time as the Indian influence a rather more classical vein was still found in earrings such as the Camellia clips (and brooches), leaves composed of bead and prong-set rubies (and sapphires) and diamonds." Evelyne Possémé in the Van Cleef & Arpels exhibition catalogues. Pictured with rubies and diamonds as earrings in Van Cleef & Arpels L''Art De La Haute Joaillerie, by Evelyne Possémé, Les Arts Decoratifs, 2013, page 187.

Van Cleef & Arpels Mid-20th Century Diamond Sapphire and Platinum ''Camilla'' Brooch

Van Cleef & Arpels Mid-20th Century Diamond and Sapphire ''Camellia'' Earrings

A pair of Mid-20th Century platinum "Camellia" earrings with diamonds and blue sapphires by Van Cleef & Arpels. The earrings have 150 round-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of 6.00 carats, G/H color, VS clarity, and 48 round and oval-cut sapphires with an approximate total weight of 7.70 carats. "At the same time as the Indian influence a rather more classical vein was still found in earrings such as the Camellia clips, leaves composed of bead and prong-set rubies (and sapphires) and diamonds." Evelyne Possémé in the Van Cleef & Arpels exhibition catalogues. Pictured with rubies and diamonds in Van Cleef & Arpels L''Art De La Haute Joaillerie, by Evelyne Possémé, Les Arts Decoratifs, 2013, page 187.

Van Cleef & Arpels Mid-20th Century Diamond and Sapphire ''Camellia'' Earrings

French Art Nouveau Pâte-de-Verre Paperweight by Walter

A French Art Nouveau pâte-de-verre paperweight by Amalric Walter and Henri Bergé featuring an intricately textured blue and green chameleon sitting on a rock. A similar paperweight is pictured in Amalric Walter (1870-1959), by Keith Cummings, Kingswinford: Broadfield House Glass Museum, 2006, p. 19, cat. no. 16c.

French Art Nouveau Pâte-de-Verre Paperweight by Walter

French Art Nouveau Pedestal by André

A French Art Nouveau walnut pedestal attributed to Emile André, featuring sinuous legs with understated organic carvings. A similar pedestal is pictured in "The Paris Salons 1895-1915, Vol. III: Furniture," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1996, p. 40 (Exposition de l''Ecole de Nancy, Paris, 1903).

French Art Nouveau Pedestal by André

"Langouste", Pâte de Verre Paperweight by Walter and Bergé.

A French Art Nouveau pâte de verre by Amalric Walter and Henri Bergé. The paperweight has a brown "Langouste" resting on a sculpted pâte de verre base. There is great detail in the claws and the sections of the tails. A similar paperweight is pictured in: Amalric Walter (1870-1959), by Keith Cummings, Kingswinford: Broadfield House Glass Museum, 2006, p. 49, cat. no. 77c.

'Langouste', Pâte de Verre Paperweight by Walter and Bergé.

Art Nouveau Brooch with Aquamarine, Diamond and plique-à-jour Enamel by Lalique

"L''Anémone des Bois", A French Art Nouveau masterwork by René Lalique. Created in 1897, this 18 karat gold brooch showcases Lalique''s mastery of "plique-à-jour" enamel and also represents one of his earliest explorations of the art of molded glass. The brooch is accented by two oval faceted aquamarines weighing approximately 8.10 and 3.75 carats. More than any technical mastery or gemological import, the brooch is distinguished by its aesthetics and its deep meaning. This exquisite "Anémones des Bois" Brooch is an important example of René Lalique''s early work, predating his international debut at the Exposition Universelle of 1900. While his most prolific version of the anemone motif was the "Anémone couronnée" or poppy anemone, only a few choice pieces depict the "Anémone des Bois" or wood anemone. Unlike the poppy anemone, which grew in the balmy Mediterranean summer, the Anémone des Bois was known to the French as the harbinger of spring. While the forest floor lay dormant, the wood anemone alone reared its small head. Areas where the poor could pick this humble flower were demarcated with signs reading "Les Halles." The Anémone des Bois lined the border of the forest, enticing promenading couples into the forest''s embrace for an afternoon tryst. Pure white anemones thus became a symbol of virginal purity, mourning its imminent profanity by carnal desire. Lalique ... knew these traditions well from spending his childhood and summer holidays in the commune of Aÿ in Marne, located on a plateau overlooking the hillsides of Champagne. Two forests dominated the Marne landscape. To the west lay the old-growth forest of Sermiers, and to the east lay La forêt domaniale du Chêne à la Vierge. Promenading in the forest was a popular Sunday pastime for locals, especially as a way to escape the unrelenting dry heat of the noonday sun. Lalique expanded upon the theme of carnal desire, using the anemone to allegorize the stages of courtship. Our Anémone des Bois marked the beginning of this five-year-long exploration. With its petals slightly closed, the flower embodies the initial "rejet" or rejection of love. Fitting of a depiction of "rejet" the work epitomizes divine symmetry and youthful vigor. The flower''s posture relates to local wisdom: villagers could tell rain was coming when the Anémone des Bois closed its petals. By closing its petals, the flower rebuffs the words and sexual advances of the man. The second anemone in the series has its petals in disarray but receptive to potential pollination. An anemone in this position embodied "l''acceptation de l''amour" or the acceptance of love. The third anemone is the most sensual of the series, two anemones approach a passionate kiss, embodying the "consommation" or consummation. The final anemone in the series was completed in 1901. Titled "Mort de l''anémone" it is Lalique''s only representation of the blue anemone. Through the consummation, its petals have been dyed and its purity defiled. In macabre detail, the skeletal structure of the anemone''s rhizomes, or underground stems, are put on full view. The plant has been uprooted, and the encounter has finished. Contemporary novelist Émile Pouvillon related the death of the anemone to the act of deflowering in his 1895 short story "Les Anémones sont Mortes." The story''s heroine, a young country girl, loses herself in a bout of unrestrained euphoria with her lover. In their rolling about, "Anémones des Bois" are ripped out and bruised. At the 1898 Salon, the first Anémone des Bois was a critical triumph. Displayed with the second and third anemone in the series, the first was favored for its fully articulated plique-à-jour leaves. In the premier French decorative arts magazine Art et Décoration, the Anémone des Bois was praised for its "candid whiteness" and leaves that suggest "an infinitely complicated and precious architecture." Our Anémone des Bois is resplendent with the technical acuity that made Lalique known as the "master of modern bijoux (jewelry.)" In his early years, Lalique personally designed and modeled each mold for his creations in clay. These molds were then cast in iron and coated with a paste of resin and beeswax, hand-tooled for detail. The finish pressed-glass jewel was submerged in a bath of hydrofluoric acid, frosting the exterior. A thin layer of "jade green" powdered enamel was sifted and annealed onto the piece. The venation of each petal was painstakingly cut, revealing the plain crystal underneath. The warm glow of the gold backing gives the piece a breathtaking amber hue.

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Art Nouveau Brooch with Aquamarine, Diamond and plique-à-jour Enamel by Lalique

A French Art Nouveau Wooden Pedestal by Emile Gallé

A French Art Nouveau selette by Émile Gallé. Gallé made very few selettes of this quality and design during his career, and even fewer of those with curved lower pieces that reunite in the middle, culminating in a gorgeous flower in full bloom. This model is very similar to the famous version with banana leaves, called Bananie. The marquetry on the top and middle sections of the selette, depicting flowers and leaves, is extremely bright and detailed. The variations of color emphasize the differences between the brighter lilies of the valley and the darker background. The curves and flowing details of the wood carving surrounding the top shelf come to challenge the stricter straight lines used for the contour of the piece. The balance between curves and straight line work in perfect harmony and together underline the subject matter. A similar selette is pictured in: "Gallé Furniture," by Alastair Duncan and Georges de Bartha, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 2012, p. 245, plates 4 & 4a.

A French Art Nouveau Wooden Pedestal by Emile Gallé

"Poissons Dans Les Vagues" Vase by Gabriel Argy-Rousseau

A French Art Nouveau "Poissons dans les vagues" pâte de verre vase by Gabriel Argy-Rousseau. The vase depicts green and blue fish swimming through a clear textured surface over white waves and a deep blue base. A similar vase is featured in Bloch-Dermant, G. Argy-Rousseau, London 1991, cat. rais. 25.15. page 205. Also in Victor Arwas, Art Deco, New York, 1980, p. 266.

'Poissons Dans Les Vagues' Vase by Gabriel Argy-Rousseau

Louis Zorra French Art Nouveau Plique-à-Jour Enamel, Gold and Freshwater Pearl Pendant

A French Art Nouveau 18 karat gold pendant/brooch with freshwater pearl drop and plique-à-jour enamel, depicting a maiden in profile against a sky with clouds and framed with pink poppy blossoms by Louis Zorra. The serpentine clouds, the woman''s abundant tresses, and the flower tendrils all follow the organic curvilinear line associated with Art Nouveau. Nature, flowers and women are themes that were often explored in tandem by fin-de-siècle artists. Here they function together to create a harmonious and picturesque scene that delights the eye. Pictured in "The French Aesthetic, Art Nouveau", by Victor Arwas, Andreas Papadakis, page 346.

Louis Zorra French Art Nouveau Plique-à-Jour Enamel, Gold and Freshwater Pearl Pendant

Kauffman de Suisse Emerald Cut Diamond Necklace

A modern platinum necklace with diamonds by Kauffmann de Suisse. The necklace has 78 emerald-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of 69.23 carats. PT 950.

Kauffman de Suisse Emerald Cut Diamond Necklace

Kauffman de Suisse Diamond Drop Earrings

A pair of modern platinum earrings with two emerald-cut diamonds dropped from two oval-cut diamonds, by Kaufmann de Suisse. The earrings have 2 emerald-cut diamonds that each weigh 3.20 carats with an E color and VVS-2 clarity grade and 3.06 carats with an E color and VS-1 clarity grade. They are set with 2 oval brilliant-cut diamonds that each weigh .90 carat and .85 carat. They have an approximate color grade of E-F and VS clarity grade. The emerald-cut diamonds each have certificates from the Gemological Institute of America #5647929 and #15174507.

Kauffman de Suisse Diamond Drop Earrings

Emerald cut Diamond Engagement Ring

A modern 18 karat white gold ring with diamond by Kauffman de Suisse. The ring is set with a emerald-cut diamond weighing 5.09 carats, flanked by sheild-shaped baguettes. Accompanied by GIA report no. 13564712 stating F color, VS1 clarity, no fluorescence. The emerald-cut diamonds have certificates from the Gemological Institute of America #13564712

Emerald cut Diamond Engagement Ring

Kauffmann de Suisse Diamond Line Bracelet

A modern platinum bracelet with diamonds by Kauffmann de Suisse. The bracelet has 37 emerald-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of 28.11 carats with an approximate E-G color and VS-1 clarity grade.

Kauffmann de Suisse Diamond Line Bracelet

"Chardons des Sables" Commode

A French Art Nouveau "Chardons des Sables" chest of drawers by Émile Gallé. The "Chardons des Sables" (sand thistle) commode is a moving meditation on mortality. Gallé created this piece in 1903, after he was diagnosed with leukemia. He died the following year. Gallé has rendered a vista redolent of a longing for return. The commode''s central "sand thistle" motif alludes to a passage in Victor Hugo''s poem Les contemplations, Paroles sur la dune (1854): Maintenant que mon temps décroît comme un flambeau Que mes tâches sont terminées; Maintenant que voici que je touche au tombeau Par les deuils et par les années, (...) Je regarde, au dessus du mont et du vallon, Et des mers sans fin remuées, S''envoler sous le bec du vautor aquilon, Toute la toisuon des nuées (...) Et je pense, écoutant gémir le vent amer, Et l''onde aux plis infranchissables; L''été rit, et l''on voit sur le bord de la mer Fleurir le chardon bleu des sables. Now that, like candlelight, my lifetime wanes And my tasks are complete; Now that I, passing years and faced with pains, Find the grave at my feet, (...) I watch, high over mountaintop and vale And ever-surging sea, Before the beak of that vulture the gale, The woolen clouds all flee. (...) So I reflect, hearing the wind''s harsh roar, And the wave''s boundless pow ... er Though summer smiles, and on the sandy shore, See the blue sand thistle flower. Like Victor Hugo in Les contemplations, Paroles sur la dune, the sand thistle figured on the marquetry frontispiece is towards the end of its bloom season. Most of the flower heads have turned dark brown and three have detached from their rosettes only to blow away in the ocean gale. To understand the extent of Gallé''s thematic dedication, one need only look at a blackened sand thistle leaf located in the center back of the commode top. The leaf is of the same value as the aqueous background, rendering it nearly imperceptible. Though seemingly a superfluous detail, the leaf''s inclusion completes the piece''s narrative: the plant, like the artist, fades into oblivion. Gallé''s pairing of image and poem is steeped in Japanese tradition. Gallé believed that Japanese artists painted with a "spirituel pinceau" (spiritual brush) and that marine plants were "bulleuse calligraphie" (blistered calligraphy). Unlike his previous Hugo-inspired furniture, Gallé has opted not to include the refrains of the poem that inspired this piece in the marquetry. Instead the work itself has become the poem. Gallé had previously synthesized land and sea in his 1889 Flora Marina, Flora exotica jardiniere. While his prior explorations of the theme relied heavily on allegory and ornate high relief carving, the "Chardons des Sables" commode is a prime example of Gallé''s aesthetic maturation into a thoroughly modern artist. Gone are the ink and shellac outlines and the sand-shaded wood. Rather, Gallé has taken advantage of the striations, figuring and coloration of the natural veneer. The "Chardon des sables" commode stands on four short legs with five long drawers in a carcass of walnut. The first and fifth drawer feature umbelliferae friezes. The second to fourth drawer fronts are veneered with marquetry panels showing "Chardon des sables" in front of the sea. The sky background of the second and third drawer utilizes Burmese rosewood. While rays are a cell type present in all hardwoods, woods in which the rays appear as parallel minute dark stripes of wood are rare. This feature, termed "storied rays," are only found in choice species of tropical hardwoods. For the background of the commode''s frontispiece, the ray patterning serves as a secondary pattern to the dominant dark veining. In this way, although the sky and sea are represented by different wood species, the storied rays imbue the piece with a visual harmony. The Burmese rosewood used in the sky was selected so that the height between each striation decreased as it approached the horizon thereby creating a depth of field. The striation terminates two-thirds of the way down the third drawer. The uniformity from this point until the horizon line mimics the way in which clouds merge into a continuous layer in the deep background. The Le Champ du Sang commode, a piece created three years prior to this one, for the Exposition Universelle de 1900, was designed in a similar compositional formula: foreground flowers and low horizon line. The horizon line was articulated as a hard edge with two contrasting pieces of wood spliced together. The stillness of the scene is palpably felt. As opposed to Le Champ du Sang, the Chardons des Sables commode features a remarkably seamless transition between the sky and the undulating ripples of the sea. Recent close examination has confirmed that the pattern was formed by cutting a single piece of veneer using two different methods. This is evidenced by the wood''s ray arrangement. The first quarter of the drawer is uniformly colored with horizontally storied rays. In the undulating dark brown pattern of the bottom three-quarters of the drawer, the ray arrangement becomes varied (horizontally, obliquely and vertically.) Horizontal storied rays only become visible in crown cut veneer where the wood is cut tangentially to the growth ring. Meanwhile, the varied "storied ray" arrangement only becomes visible when the wood is rotary cut, wherein, the log is centered on a lathe and turned against a broad cutting knife set into the log at a slight angle. To create the veneer''s pattern, the wood must have first been rotary cut. The log had to be subsequently removed from the lathe, and a steam-powered band saw had to rip the wood precisely a few millimeters to the left and right of the rotary cut''s terminus. The method used in the fourth drawer was an extremely time-consuming and precise method of cutting-- all done for the sake of capturing the artist''s compelling personal vision. The characteristic dark-veined swirled grain rotary cut pattern combined with the pommele markings present throughout distinguish the wood as Bubinga, a wood sourced from Equatorial Africa. The density of the pommele-figured Bubinga causes a chatoyant (changeable luster) effect. The resultant sheen simulates the way that light dapples across the water, ideal for Gallé''s representation of the ocean. The work stands out not only in its exceptional artistic technique but also marks the culmination of a scientific career. A lifetime as a botanist had given Gallé a penchant for morphological accuracy. Gallé had previously depicted other species of brittle stars, namely the Striped Ophiolepis superba. While Ophiolepis superba features short to non-existent arm spines, Gallé has chosen to depict the long arm spined Ophiothrix fragilis (hairy brittle star). Using an astounding economy of means, Gallé articulated these spines using the natural wood texture of the Cocos nucifera (Red Coconut Palm.) The contrasting red-brown, black and light gray-brown fibrovascular bundles of the Coconut Palm respectively articulate the negative space between the spines, the shadows of each spine, and the delicate mucosal spines themselves. In another instance of material specificity, the bumpy conceptacles (reproductive cavities) on a bladderwrack are rendered by Gallé using birdseye-figured Acer saccharum (Sugar Maple.) Gallé collected and preserved a variety of seaweed and shell specimens while in the Keller villa. Charles Keller (alias Jacques Turbin) was an anarchist, activist, poet and archaeologist. Keller had built a seafront villa in Carnac, Brittany after the excavation in 1862 of the Saint-Michel Tumulus, a megalithic grave mound. He regularly invited Gallé to this seaside retreat, and even when Gallé returned to Nancy, Keller was sure to send new species to add to Gallé''s burgeoning herbarium. Gallé''s choice of motifs on the commode''s top go far beyond scientific interest in morphological accuracy. Integral to Gallé''s macchia is the dissimilarity of the stiff and flexible, the brittle and fluid. Unlike the closely-related sea star, brittle stars have sinuous flexing arms, giving their legs an efflorescent appearance. This quality makes the brittle star an ideal object of representation. Conversely, the thick stem of the star thistle reads to the viewer as kelp in this underwater milieu. At the point in which the marine becomes flora and flora becomes marine, the conceptual unity of the piece reaches its culmination. Hugo, Victor, E. H. Blackmore, and A. M. Blackmore. 2004. Selected poems of Victor Hugo: a bilingual edition. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. Gallé, Emile. 1908. Écrits pour l''art: floriculture, art décoratif, notices d''exposition, 1884-1889. Paris: Renouard. https://archive.org/details/critspourlartflo00gall. Pictured in: "The Paris Salons 1895-1914 Volume III: Furniture," by Alastair Duncan, Antique Collectors Club, 1996, page 235.

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'Chardons des Sables' Commode

"Aux Grenouilles" Umbrella Stand, by Emile Gallé

French Art Nouveau marquetry "Aux Grenouilles" umbrella stand, by Emile Gallé. This stand for umbrellas and walking sticks incorporates frog (Grenouille) handles and feet in cast bronze, a decorative fillip that provides an otherwise utilitarian piece of furniture with a novel and charming appeal. The cabinet''s feet are syntheses of the legs of a pickerel frog and the feet of a lion. While Galle''s artistic antecedents created chimeric creatures of their own, their fabrication was more of a fantasy than a representation of reality. By the turn of the century, the rapidly developing field of microbiology had rendered the creation of chimeras a foreseeable event. The writings and discoveries of Louis Pasteur added an entirely new class of symbols to Galle''s oeuvre. Galle wrote of Pasteur''s discoveries "we can decipher, behind the chimeric anatomies, the realities that have become manifest, submitted, cataloged, grown in test tubes." In 1892, Galle honored Pasteur for his contributions to science with a vase. The vase is decorated with all manners of mythological creatures and microorganisms. In the cabinet''s "Grenouilles" feet, the artist syncretizes the symbols of two different "currents." The morphology of the lion''s paw offers the viewer a "peaceful stream of our predilections." The lion paw with its hallowed history calls to mind the conservative values of nobil ... ity and honor. By comparison, the hind legs of the pickerel frog originate from the "fast...deep…[and] powerful" current of modernity that offers symbols free from prescribed values. In the hands of Galle''s genius, these symbols generate all manners of novel methods of furniture construction that are evident. The cabinet features two doors opening to reveal two shelves. The left door is veneered with two dragonflies that dart amongst the pickerel rush. This American aquatic plant was popular amongst French horticulturalists as a staple in ornamental fish ponds. Galle''s "Aux Grenouilles" design was the only instance in which Galle represented the pickerel rush. The Grenouille cabinet is a rare example of Galle''s use of sand shading. This eighteenth-century technique involves the submersion of veneer pieces in hot sand. This provides a subtle gradation that is visible in the outer serrated margin of the pickerel leaf and the background of the mushroom landscape. The upper right-hand drawer is decorated with a frieze of carved wood arrowheads that wraps around the cabinet''s sides. The arrowheads are furled into arabesques that echo the dragonflies in the gallery. Similar "Aux Grenouilles" umbrella stand pictured in Gallé Furniture, by Alastair Duncan and Georges de Bartha, Antique Collectors'' Club, Page 287, Plate 5.

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'Aux Grenouilles' Umbrella Stand, by Emile Gallé

French Art Nouveau Lithograph, "La Princesse Lointaine" by Alphonse Mucha

A French Art Nouveau lithograph by Alphonse Mucha. An exquisite portrait of Sarah Bernhardt in the role of "La Princesse Lointaine" is used here for publicizing "LU" (Lefévre-Utile) biscuits, with a handwritten testimonial by the actress herself: "Je ne trouve rien de meilleur qu''un petit LU; oh si, deux petits LU." (I haven''t found anything better than a little LU--oh yes, two little LU.) "La Princesse Lointaine" was one of Sarah''s great successes, a play written for her by Edmond Rostand based an old medieval tale, shown for the first time in 1895. She played Melisande, daughter of one of the crusader kings from Tripoli who becomes famous far and wide for her beauty. When word of her charm reaches a French knight, Jofroi, he sets out on a long and exhausting journey at the end of which he dies in ecstasy after having accomplished his goal of seeing her and telling her of his love. The Lefèvre-Utile Company also used other artists to produce posters in this series which featured testimonials by prominent personalities; many were also issued as postcards. The heraldic birds on each corner were appropriated from the heraldic casket of Saint Louis (King Louis IX) on view at the Louvre. A detail from the casket figured in Owen Jones''s seminal work, Grammar of Ornament (1856). Pictured in "Alphonse Mucha: The Complete Posters and Panels" by Jack Rennert and Alain Weill, Page 308-309, Plate 86.

French Art Nouveau Lithograph, 'La Princesse  Lointaine' by Alphonse Mucha

French Art Nouveau "Danseuse A L''Écharpe No. 12" gilt bronze sculptures by Agathon Léonard.

A French Art Nouveau "Danseuse A L''Écharpe No. 12" gilt bronze sculpture by Agathon Léonard. Originally created as a smaller group of ceramic figures, possibly based on the dancer Loïe Fuller, the series was completed in hard porcelain by the Manufacture Nationale de Sèvres as a fifteen-piece table-top group, "Jeu de L''Echarpe." After acclaim at the Paris Exposition Universelle of 1900, the French foundry Susse Frères produced bronze casts of these, incorporating discreet lighting on some models. Published/Exhibited: Macklowe and Goldring, "Dynamic Beauty: Sculpture of Art Nouveau Paris," 2011, p. 190; Böstge, "Agathon Léonard: Le geste Art Nouveau," 2003, p. 75.

French Art Nouveau 'Danseuse A L''Écharpe No. 12' gilt bronze sculptures by Agathon Léonard.

Lithograph "En l''honneur de Sarah Bernhardt" by Mucha

A French Art Nouveau lithograph "En l''honneur de Sarah Bernhardt - ses admirateurs et ses amis" by Alphonse Mucha. Stamped "F. Champenois, Paris". This image was originally created to announce an article about the legendary actress which was to appear in the December 15, 1896 issue of the magazine "La Plume". The article was to coincide with a celebratory banquet on November 9, 1896 given by The Divine Sarah''s friends and admirers. Due to editorial problems, the article was delayed until the January 1, 1897 issue, but the image was used by the sponsors of the banquet in a poster honoring Mlle Bernhardt. Pictured in "Alphonse Mucha: The Complete Posters and Panels", by Jack Rennert and Alain Weill," page 112, cat. 21 var. 1. Provenance: Elizabeth Taylor

Lithograph 'En l''honneur de Sarah Bernhardt' by Mucha

Boucheron Retro Gold ''Epis'' Bracelet

A French Retro 18 karat yellow gold bracelet by Boucheron. The heavy bracelet is made of 10 polished yellow gold palmettes links. Pictured as a necklace in Boucheron La Capture de L''eclat, by Patrick Wald Lasowski, Anne-Marie Clais, Edition Cercle D''Art, 2005, page , Plate 159.

Boucheron Retro Gold  ''Epis''  Bracelet

Tiffany Studios "Millefiori" Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York monumental glass "Aquamarine" vase, featuring iridescent yellow, blue and brown marsh marigolds against an iridescent aquamarine ground. The vase''s featured flower, the marsh marigold (Caltha palustris), was a common spring wildflower that was often seen in the marshy areas on the grounds of Tiffany''s garden estate, Laurelton Hall. While the marsh marigold motif was previously used in Tiffany''s Metalwork and Enameling Department, what distinguished Tiffany''s aquamarine vases was the decision to view an above-ground flower through a lens of water. Like many of his fellow fin-de-siècle aesthetes, Tiffany frequently vacationed in the Bahamas, at Nassau, on New Providence Island. Inspired by the island''s lush marine and aquatic life, Tiffany sent Arthur Sanders, one of his gaffers, to tour the island in a glass-bottomed boat. Invented in 1878, the glass-bottomed boat consisted of two or three decks and almost no bottom, in place of which were great panes of glass or windows. No longer impeded by the water''s optically erratic surface, tourists could view the ocean''s bottom through the boat''s floor, similar to the view through a scuba diver''s mask. The glass-bottomed boat thereafter became a popular tourist attraction in many island locales. Tiffany encased his designs in thick layers of green glass to emulate the intimate view of the glass-botto ... med boat. The complex process of internal decoration meant few vases survived the vase''s cooling stage. The artistic value and technical difficulty of the Aquamarine vases were reflected in their high price of $300.

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Tiffany Studios 'Millefiori' Vase

French Art Nouveau "Aux Clématites" Easel

A French Art Nouveau "Aux Clématites" easel from l''Ecole de Nancy, probably designed by Louis Majorelle, featuring a clematis decoration at the top and bottom. The display rest is adjustable.

French Art Nouveau 'Aux Clématites' Easel

French Art Nouveau Ceramic Vase by Bussière

A French Art Nouveau ceramic vase designed by Ernest Bussière and produced by Keller et Guérin, modeled foliate motif in high relief with green and purple glaze. A similar vase was shown at the Exposition de l''Ecole de Nancy in Paris in 1903 (see The Paris Salons 1895-1915, Vol. IV: Ceramics and Glass, by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1998, p. 260).

French Art Nouveau Ceramic Vase by Bussière

French Art Nouveau Lithograph "Lait pur stérilisé de la Vingeanne" by Théophile-Alexandre Steinlen

A French Art Nouveau lithograph, "Lait pur stérilisé de la Vingeanne" by Théophile-Alexandre Steinlen. This poster, advertising ''pure, sterilized milk from Vingeanne'' presents the viewer with a wholesome image of a young girl (the artist''s daughter), perched on a chair, drinking from a bowl of milk with both hands. Three cats crowd around her feet, their mouths open as if meowing plaintively. Since his childhood, Théophile-Alexandre Steinlen had shown an aptitude for depicting cats, frequently making them the focal point of his works. A caricature of Steinlen published in 1898, shows a wave of animals threatening to completely engulf the artist, with a giant cat at his left shoulder. Steinlen was born in Lausanne in 1859 and, after arriving in Paris in 1881, soon became a member of the artistic community in Montmartre, of which Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec and Adolphe Willette were also members. Steinlen and Toulouse-Lautrec depicted several of the same subjects in their work but it was the Swiss artist who enjoyed greater fame during the artists'' lifetimes, no doubt due to his ability to undertake more commercial work, such as this poster for Vingeanne milk, which reached a greater audience than Toulouse-Lautrec''s controversial graphic work.

French Art Nouveau Lithograph 'Lait pur stérilisé de la Vingeanne' by Théophile-Alexandre Steinlen