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Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase with Serpents by Ernest Leveillé

An Art Nouveau cameo glass vase by Ernest Leveillé for Escalier de Cristal, with two wheel carved red serpents in high relief intertwined around the outer surface. The background glass has a moss-like texture trapped within the vessel. The vase sits within a bronze mount at the bottom. The style of the background glass is the same as in many of his sophisticated pieces and the technique is the same as in many of his hand carved (wheel-carved) glass vases. The vase was retailed by Escalier de Cristal of Paris, one of the great proponents of Art Nouveau at the turn of the 20th century.

Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase with Serpents by Ernest Leveillé

French Art Nouveau silver and plique-à-jour enamel coupe d''ornement by Eugène Feuillâtre

A French Art Nouveau silver and plique-à-jour enamel coupe d''ornement by Eugène Feuillâtre. This exceptional compote features delicate and stylized floral patterns on the upper and lower portions. Green leaves encircle the base of the piece and the sinewy stem of the petite cup appears to grow out of the foliage below, and a spray of pink flowers blooms at the top of the compote. Feuillâtre complimented the deeply rooted organic motifs of his quintessentially Art Nouveau compote by adorning the piece with small green enamel buds on the top and bottom of the stem. This compote is particularly remarkable because it is made almost entirely of plique-à-jour enamel. Eugene Feuillâtre (1870-1916) was a sculptor, enamelist, silversmith and jeweler. He worked for Lalique at the end of the 19th century and established his own firm in 1899, specializing in plique-à-jour decorated objects. He also perfected the technique of enameling on silver and platinum. Provenance: the Collection of Joseph R. Ritman. A nearly identical coupe d''ornement resides in the Musee D''Orsay in Paris.

French Art Nouveau silver and plique-à-jour enamel coupe d''ornement by Eugène Feuillâtre

Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

A French Art Nouveau cameo glass vase by Daum, featuring a scene of red blooming flowers on an opaque white martelé ground. The flowers, which have dark centers, are suspended from dark curving stems that emerge from dark green carved leaves. Pictured in Glass, Art Nouveau to Art Deco, by Victor Arwass, page 83. Art Nouveau, the French Aesthetic,by Victor Arwas, page 506.

Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

French Art Nouveau cameo glass vase by Émile Gallé

A French Art Nouveau cameo glass vase by Émile Gallé. This large vase is decorated with wheel carved purple trumpet-creepers and vines against a green background. The flowers and vines climb up the ribbed neck of the vase. The "liseron" vase is a flattened baluster form vase with an everted mouth, rounded and polished rim, long slender-waisted neck, short globular body, and an applied disk foot. The vase features an intercalaire layer of coarse jade frit in the top three-quarters of the vase and fine indigo frit in the bottom quarter of the vase. To construct the vase, a bubble was blown into the gather, which was cased and parison inflated into a dip mold with 19 ribs. The stem was subsequently plucked out and twisted counterclockwise. Finally, a soffieta was used to open the mouth and a pair of jacks was used to evert the rim. The vase was later cameo cut with exquisite detailing in the venation and the hirsute texture of the leaves. The vase depicts eight heads of Liseron japonais (Ipomoea nil ([Japanese morning glory].) The flower was introduced to Nancy by Takashima Hokkai, a fellow member of the Ecole de Nancy and Japanese Director of Forestry. Hokkai was invited as a juror for the Central Nancy Horticultural society exhibition of 1887. At the exhibition, Gallé presented Hokkai a Japanese morning glory in thanks for his contributions to the field of horticulture. ... The Japanese morning glory adorned the walls of Gallé''s studio until his death in 1904. To accompany this oriental flower, Gallé has given the morning glories a jade background. Commonly featured in the eighteenth century Shigemasa Kitao birds and flower prints that Gallé consulted, the creation of a jade simulant is only fitting for this oriental flower.

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French Art Nouveau cameo glass vase by Émile Gallé

Art Nouveau pâte de verre "Masques" Vase by Gabriel Argy-Rousseau

A French Art Nouveau pâte de verre "Masques" vase by Gabriel Argy-Rousseau. The vase is decorated with two red masks that are framed in purple and green leaves. Provenance: Christie''s, New York, Important 20th Century Decorative Arts Including Works by Tiffany Studios, 13 June 2002, lot 39. A similar vase is pictured in J. Bloch-Dermont, Les Pâtes de Verre G. Argy-Rousseau Catalogue Raisonné, Paris, 1990, p. 178, no. 14.06.

Art Nouveau pâte de verre 'Masques' Vase by Gabriel Argy-Rousseau

A French Art Nouveau Marquetry Vase by Émile Gallé

A French Art Nouveau marquetry vase by Émile Gallé. The vase features crocus flowers in hues of orange and purple against a cream ground with stripes in pink and red. The vase is accented with an applied band of tendrils backed by silver foil inclusions. A similar vase is pictured in: Émile Gallé et le Verre, la Collection du musée de l''École de Nancy, Parks: Somogy editions d''art, 2004, p. 137, ca. not. 222.

A French Art Nouveau Marquetry Vase by Émile Gallé

"Winter Scene" Glass Vase by Daum.

A French Art Nouveau "Winter Scene" cameo glass vase by Daum Nancy. A group of bare trees in the foreground sit on snowy ground under a yellow and orange sky. A larger group of bare trees are in the background. PROVENANCE: From an Unreserved Texas Estate. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: Daum Frères: Maîtres Verriers, 1892-1935, by Katharina Büttiker-Weber, Zurich: Galerie Katharina Büttiker, 1986, cat. no 27.

'Winter Scene' Glass Vase by Daum.

French Art Nouveau "Winter Landscape" Vase by Daum Nancy

A French Art Nouveau "Winter Landscape" vase with an inverted lip, by Daum Nancy. The etched and enameled glass vase depicts trees in a barren meadow, a forested background against an amber and orange sky. PROVENANCE: From an Unreserved Texas Estate. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: Daum Frères: Maîtres Verriers, 1892-1935, by Katharina Büttiker-Weber, Zurich: Galerie Katharina Büttiker, 1986, cat. no 27.

French Art Nouveau 'Winter Landscape' Vase by Daum Nancy

French Art Nouveau Glass Vase by Émile Gallé,

A French Art Nouveau carved cameo glass vase by Émile Gallé, decorated with oak leaves and a staghorn beetle.. On a background that changes gradually from pale yellow to pale orange, a brown staghorn beetle climbs a brown branch toward green leaves. A similar vase is pictured in: Émile Gallé, by Philippe Garner, London: Academy Editions, 1976, p. 112.

French Art Nouveau Glass Vase by Émile Gallé,

French Art Nouveau Vase, "Eucalyptus," by Gabriel Argy-Rousseau

A French Art Nouveau pâte de verre vase, "Eucalyptus," by Gabriel Argy-Rousseau. The vase has three isolated brown branches, each with curving purple and green leaves, and flower buds, also in purple and green, in relief. Provenance: Mr. Kenneth W. Davis, Fort Worth, Texas. An example of this vase is pictured in: G. Argy Rousseau: Glassware as Art, by Janine Bloch-Dermant, London: Thames and Hudson, Ltd., 1991, p. 180, cat. no 19.06.

French Art Nouveau Vase, 'Eucalyptus,' by Gabriel Argy-Rousseau

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass by Émile Gallé

A French Art Nouveau cameo glass vase by Émile Gallé. The carved blooming flowers are painted in reds and whites, with green accents. Some of the carved stems are also painted, in reds and greens.

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass by Émile Gallé

"Grapevine" Cameo Glass vase by Émile Gallé

A French Art Nouveau "Grapevine blowout" cameo glass vase by Émile Gallé. The vase is decorated with gray-violet grapes hanging from red vines which are surrounded by dark red-brown foliage. The background is opalescent cream.

'Grapevine' Cameo Glass vase by Émile Gallé

French Art Nouveau ''Fleurs de Pommier'' Cameo Glass Vase by Émile Gallé.

A French Art Nouveau ''Fleurs de pommier'' cameo glass vase by Émile Gallé. This ovular vase features crimson leaves and crisp red apple blossoms on a gold ground. The flora are rendered in slightly translucent glass, which makes a remarkable contrast against the opaque ground. Gallé had a remarkable ability to convey feeling and time in his work. With a static sky and vividly warm color, this vase has the essence of a summer sunset. A similar vase is pictured in: Glass by Gallé, by Alastair Duncan and Georges de Bartha, New York: Harry N. Abrams, Inc., 1984, p. 195, plate 295.

French Art Nouveau ''Fleurs de Pommier'' Cameo Glass Vase by Émile Gallé.

French Art Nouveau "Nénuphars" Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

A French Art Nouveau "Nénuphars" cameo glass vase by Daum. The opalescent body of the vase features wheel-carved orange and brown water lilies in varied states of maturity against a blue martelé ground.

French Art Nouveau 'Nénuphars' Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

"Poissons Dans Les Vagues" Vase by Gabriel Argy-Rousseau

A French Art Nouveau "Poissons dans les vagues" pâte de verre vase by Gabriel Argy-Rousseau. The vase depicts green and blue fish swimming through a clear textured surface over white waves and a deep blue base. A similar vase is featured in Bloch-Dermant, G. Argy-Rousseau, London 1991, cat. rais. 25.15. page 205. Also in Victor Arwas, Art Deco, New York, 1980, p. 266.

'Poissons Dans Les Vagues' Vase by Gabriel Argy-Rousseau

Art Nouveau Enameled and Etched Glass Vase by Daum

A French Art Nouveau enameled and etched glass vase by Daum. The curved stems of the organic scene are mimicked by the amphoric body of the vase. This bright vase is dominated by two planes of mottled glass, golden yellow on top of deep purple, which together create a landscape scene. The vase is decorated with etched and enameled flowers. The flora seem to grow from the base of the vase because of the landscape effect achieved in the ground behind the scene. At the base, the leaves and stems of the flowers appear as shadows, as they are only etched into the dark ground. Once the flora break through into the golden section of the vase, the etched scene is enhanced by bright, verdant green enamel, which gives way to vibrant red orchids. The scene is completed by a curious bee floating up to the blossom. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: Daum: Maitres Verriers, 1890-1980, by Noël Daum, Lausanne: Edita Denoël, 1980, p. 122.

Art Nouveau Enameled and Etched Glass Vase by Daum

Art Nouveau Enameled and Etched Glass Vase by Daum

A French Art Nouveau enameled and etched glass vase by Daum. This vase is an elliptic cylinder, a shape which Daum used because it lends itself to undulating and soft nature scenes. This bright vase is dominated by two planes of mottled glass, golden yellow on top of deep purple, which together create a landscape scene. The vase is decorated with etched and enameled flowers. The flora seem to grow from the base of the vase because of the landscape effect achieved in the ground behind the scene. At the base, the leaves and stems of the flowers appear as shadows, as they are only etched into the dark ground. Once the flora break through into the golden section of the vase, the etched scene is enhanced by bright, verdant green enamel, which gives way to vibrant red orchids. The scene is completed by a curious bee floating up to the blossom, ready to pollinate it. The presence of the bee implies that this springtime scene is not entirely completed in the vase, but that it is rather just a part of a fleeting moment rendered in glass. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: Daum: Maitres Verriers, 1890-1980, by Noël Daum, Lausanne: Edita Denoël, 1980, p. 122.

Art Nouveau Enameled and Etched Glass Vase by Daum

Art Nouveau Enameled and Etched Glass Vase by Daum

A French Art Nouveau enameled and etched glass vase by Daum. This vase is a shape which Daum used because it lends itself to undulating and soft nature scenes. This bright vase is dominated by two planes of mottled glass, golden yellow on top of deep purple, which together create a landscape scene. The vase is decorated with etched and enameled flowers. The flora seem to grow from the base of the vase because of the landscape effect achieved in the ground behind the scene. At the base, the leaves and stems of the flowers appear as shadows, as they are only etched into the dark ground. Once the flora break through into the golden section of the vase, the etched scene is enhanced by bright, verdant green enamel, which gives way to vibrant red flowers. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: Daum: Maitres Verriers, 1890-1980, by Noël Daum, Lausanne: Edita Denoël, 1980, p. 122.

Art Nouveau Enameled and Etched Glass Vase by Daum

Art Nouveau Enameled and Etched Glass Vase by Daum

A French Art Nouveau enameled and etched "Fleurs et Abeilles" glass vase by Daum. This vase is features a shape which Daum used because it lends itself to undulating and soft nature scenes. This bright vase is dominated by two planes of mottled glass, golden yellow on top of deep purple, which together create a landscape scene. The vase is decorated with etched and enameled flowers. The flora seem to grow from the base of the vase because of the landscape effect achieved in the ground behind the scene. At the base, the leaves and stems of the flowers appear as shadows, as they are only etched into the dark ground. Once the flora break through into the golden section of the vase, the etched scene is enhanced by bright, verdant green enamel, which gives way to vibrant red orchids. The scene is completed by a curious bee floating up to the blossom, ready to pollinate it. The presence of the bee implies that this springtime scene is not entirely completed in the vase, but that it is rather just a part of a fleeting moment rendered in glass. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: Daum: Maitres Verriers, 1890-1980, by Noël Daum, Lausanne: Edita Denoël, 1980, p. 122.

Art Nouveau Enameled and Etched Glass Vase by Daum

Art Nouveau Vase "Lyciet de Barbarie" by Argy-Rousseau

A French "Lyciet de Barbarie", pâte de verre vase by Gabriel Argy-Rousseau, depicting pink wolf berries suspended from brown stems, with green leaves, all against a vignette ground of amber, honey and white. cf. J. Bloch-Dermont, Les Pâtes de Verre G. Argy-Rousseau Catalogue Raisonné, Paris, 1990, p. 179, no. 17.01 for another vase of this model.

Art Nouveau Vase 'Lyciet de Barbarie' by Argy-Rousseau

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

A French Art Nouveau cameo glass vase by Daum, decorated with deeply wheel-carved green flowers on rose and pink ground, with applied foot. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: "Daum Nancy III" by Katharina Büttiker, Zurich: Galerie Katharina Büttiker, 2009, p. 88 ("Fern" Vase).

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

A French Art Nouveau cameo glass boat-form vase by Daum, featuring an applied wheel-carved pink flowers and etched green leaves. This small, delicate vase has an unusual shape. A similar vase is pictured in: "Daum" by Clotilde Bacri, Noël Daum and Claude Pétry, Paris: Michel Aveline Éditeur, 1992, p. 91.

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

A French Art Nouveau wheel-carved cameo glass vase by Daum, featuring a decoration of blue flowers and light blue and grey stems and leaves on an opaque, mottled white and yellow ground. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: "Daum Frères: Maîtres Verriers, 1892-1935," by Katharina Büttiker-Weber, Zurich: Galerie Katharina Büttiker, 1986, cat. no. 114.

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

A French Art Nouveau wheel-carved and acid-etched cameo glass vase by Daum, featuring a carved mottled pink flower against an opaque textured ground. An identical vase is pictured in: "Daum: Collection du muse des Beaux-Arts de Nancy," Paris: Réunion des musées nationaux, 2000, cat. no. 219.

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

A French Art Nouveau cameo glass vase by Daum, featuring deep blue flowers on a mottled white and blue ground. The vase has both wheel-carving and martelé techniques. A similar vase is pictured in: "Daum Nancy III: Daum Frères – Verreries de Nancy, 1880-1930," by Katharina Büttiker, Zurich: Galerie Katharina Büttiker, 2009, p. 149.

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

A French Art Nouveau wheel-carved cameo glass pitcher by Daum, featuring an applied flowering white jonquils with yellow centers, flower buds and blades of grass against a mottled blue and white ground. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: "Daum Nancy: Maîtres Verriers" by Katharina Büttiker, Zurich: Galerie Katharina Büttiker, 2001, p. 125, cat. no. 76.

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass "Blooming Flower" Vase by Daum

A French Art Nouveau wheel-carved cameo glass vase by Daum, featuring a blooming flower in a deep blue, on an opaque white and mottled blue ground. A vase decorated in a similar style is pictured in: "Daum: Collection du muse des Beaux-Arts de Nancy," Paris: Réunion des musées nationaux, 2000, cat. no. 206.

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass 'Blooming Flower' Vase by Daum

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

A French Art Nouveau wheel-carved cameo glass vase by Daum, featuring blue flowers and dark green stems and leaves against a mottled white and blue ground. A vase decorated in a similar style is pictured in: "Daum: Collection du muse des Beaux-Arts de Nancy," Paris: Réunion des musées nationaux, 2000, cat. no. 224.

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

A French Art Nouveau satin-finished cameo glass vase, "Fleur de Coloquinte", by Daum, featuring the depiction of zucchini leaves and flowers in pale green, against a mottled opaque white and orange ground. The vase features the soufflé, or "blown-out" technique, making the leaves and flowers stand out from the shape of the vase. Pictured in: "Daum - Maitres Verriers" by Edita Denoel, Edita S.A. Lausanne, 1980, p. 61.

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

French Art Nouveau "Snow Drop" Vase by Daum

A French Art Nouveau cameo glass "Snow Drop" vase by Daum, featuring carved light blue flowers on brown stems against a mottled white and blue ground. A similar vase is pictured in: "Daum Nancy: Maîtres Verriers" by Katharina Büttiker, Zurich: Galerie Katharina Büttiker, 2001, p. 68, cat. no. 43.

French Art Nouveau 'Snow Drop' Vase by Daum

French Art Nouveau Wheel Carved Cameo Glass Bottle

A French Art Nouveau wheel-carved cameo glass bottle with stopper. The bottle is decorated with an iris flower on an opalescent background. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: "Liberty: Natura e materia" by Donata Patrussi and Giovanni Renzi, Milan: Giunti, 2011, p. 85.

French Art Nouveau Wheel Carved Cameo Glass Bottle

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

A French Art Nouveau wheel-carved cameo glass vase by Daum, featuring a decoration of blue flowers and light blue/grey stems and leaves on an opaque, mottled white and yellow ground. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: "French Cameo Glass" by Berniece and Henry Blount, Des Moines: Dr.& Mrs. Henry Blount, Jr., 1968, p. 74, cat. no. 102.

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

A French Art Nouveau cameo glass vase by Daum, comprised of three pinkish-red poppy flowers wheel carved to show different stages of bloom, against a sky blue martelé technique background, with brown foliage and peach tones towards the bottom to represent the rising sun. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: "Daum: Maitres Verriers, 1890-1980," by Noël Daum, Lausanne: Edita Denoël, 1980, p. 115 (bottom left); and in: "Daum Nancy III: Daum Frères – Verreries de Nancy, 1880-1930," by Katharina Büttiker, Zurich: Galerie Katharina Büttiker, 2009, p. 118.

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

French Art Nouveau "Mimosa" Vase by Daum

An artistic French Art Nouveau mimosa vase by Daum featuring pink cameo overlay naturalistically modeled as a languid orchid. The influences of Japanese culture permeated fin de siècle Paris and could be felt in museums and in homes. Similarly, a nascent fascination with natural forms, found in publications of the day like Ernst Haeckle''s Kunstformen der Natur, manifested itself in a proliferation of flowers in French art and design and in an intense investigation of flora where artists rivaled botanists. This piece borders on abstraction. The orchid, splayed open and surrounded by copious pollen spores, is imbued with feminine sensuality. The imaginative color palate and curving lines surpass the glass design standards of the day and render this piece a beguiling objet d''art.

French Art Nouveau 'Mimosa' Vase by Daum

French Art Nouveau Vase "Squash Blossom" by Daum

A French Art Nouveau clear glass vase with green cameo overlay in a squash blossom motif by Daum. The vase has deep green leaves, buds, flowers and a squash suspended from sinuous vines. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: "Daum: Collection du muse des Beaux-Arts de Nancy," Paris: Réunion des musées nationaux, 2000, cat. no. 224.

French Art Nouveau Vase 'Squash Blossom' by Daum

"Rose de France" Vase by Emile Gallé

A French Art Nouveau "Rose de France" vase by Emile Gallé. In 1870, Nancy, the home of Gallé, was annexed by Germany as a result of the defeat of France in the Franco-Prussian war. Gallé chose to use the motif of the red rose, which only bloomed in the Mt. Saint-Quentin province of Lorraine, as a symbol of his strident patriotism. In 1902 a vase from this series was presented to the Russian emperor as a prestigious gift from France. The vase shows Gallé''s innovative technique of glass marquetry which involved the incorporation of glass fragments of various thickness, shapes and colors into the still malleable glass. The multi-layering of glass and the use of metallic foils behind the glass make this piece so exceptional. A similar vase is pictured in: "Gallé", catalogue for the exhibition at le Musée du Luxembourg, Paris, November 1985-February 1986, "Paris: Éditions de la Réunion des muse nationaux", 1985, p. 149.

'Rose de France' Vase by Emile Gallé

"Irises" French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Burgun & Schverer

A French Art Nouveau "Irises" cameo glass vase by Burgun & Schverer with intercalaire decoration of lavender irises with green stems on a carved brilliant rose colored ground.

'Irises' French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Burgun & Schverer

"Fruit Branch" Vase by Emile Gallé

A French Art Nouveau mold blown cameo glass "Plum" vase by Emile Gallé. The applied blue and yellowish burgundy fruits rest on brown leaves, all on a yellow ground. A similar vase is pictured in: "Glass by Gallé," by Alastair Duncan and Georges de Bartha, New York: Harry N. Abrams, Inc., 1984, p. 196, plate 298.

'Fruit Branch' Vase by Emile Gallé

French Art Nouveau Cylindrical Snail Vase by Daum

A French Art Nouveau "Vigne et Escargots" vase by Daum. The vase features grape clusters, vines and leaves in low relief with an an applied snail on one of the upper leaves, all against a mottled amber, pink, red, plum and white glass ground. Some of the grapes are also applied to to heighten the natural effects of the grape clusters. The scene is loosely landscape-based, with roots at the bottom and vines hanging down from the top, but the complex composition makes the piece entirely surreal. During the Art Nouveau period artists frequently used scenes from nature to convey human emotion, and vice versa. This autumnal piece is dark and mysterious, with gnarls, roots, and snails slithering on it. The motifs, patterns, and textures on the vase imply a time of transience, like the changing of the seasons. The "Vigne et Escargots" vase was produced in five layers beginning with a colorless glass core. The top two thirds of the intercalaire layer is colored with sulfure de cadmium inclusions and the bottom third is powdered with améthyste inclusions. After being cased with colorless glass, the glass was colored with translucent white inclusions in the top two thirds of the vase and améthyste in the bottom two thirds. Cirrus clouds at sunset were created with améthyste inclusions sprinkled atop burgundy inclusions. The base features a spattering of opaque verte de paris in ... clusions. To create a soot-like atmosphere, bistre inclusions were sprinkled about the grapes. The final layer consists of burgundy inclusions in the top third and améthyste, opaque verte de paris, and translucent white inclusions in the bottom two thirds. The vase was subsequently blown into an inverted baluster form with an undulating trefoil mouth and a splayed thick concave firing foot. In the constriction between the body and foot, the body was twisted counter-clockwise, while the constriction between body and neck was twisted clockwise. The striation created by the twisting of the intercalated layers create a sense of rising air. The bodies of the burgundy snails were subsequently created with drawn out upper and lower tentacles and fused with yellow powdered glass. For the snails'' shells, a core of colorless glass was coated in light gray-brown, dark gray-brown and black powdered glass and cased in another layer of colorless glass. The snail shells were fused to the body using this very powdered glass mixture. After the design was painted in wax upon the vase, the background and snails were acid-etched, allowing the intercalated layers to show through and the snails to be given a frosted appearance. The grape vine design and snails were subsequently hand carved, taking care to detail the snail shell''s bands. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: Daum Frères: Maîtres Verriers, 1892-1935, by Katharina Büttiker-Weber, Zurich: Galerie Katharina Büttiker, 1986, cat. no. 79.

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French Art Nouveau Cylindrical Snail Vase by Daum

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

A French Art Nouveau wheel-carved cameo glass vase by Daum, featuring green leaves and orange berries against a dark orange and mottled light green ground. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: "Daum" by Clotilde Bacri, Noël Daum and Claude Pétry, Paris: Michel Aveline Éditeur, 1992, p. 95.

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

French Art Nouveau pâte-de-verre Vase, titled "Primeveres" by Rousseau,

A French Art Deco pâte-de-verre vase, titled "Primevères" (Primroses) by Gabriel Argy-Rousseau featuring purple and red organic organic decoration in relief agains a multi-colored ground. The vase is further decorated with a purple art deco ornamental upper border. Pictured in: "G.Argy-Rousseau: Les Pâtes de Verres, catalogue raisonné" by Janine Bloch-Dermant (Paris: Les Editions de l''Amateur, 1990), page 196, cat. no. 24.02.

French Art Nouveau pâte-de-verre Vase, titled 'Primeveres' by Rousseau,

French Art Nouveau Ceramic Vase by Bussière

A French Art Nouveau "Eggplant" vase, by Keller and Guérin, following a design of Ernest Bussière, featuring iridescent gold, brown and green glazes. A similar vase is pictured in: "Nancy 1900: Jugendstil in Lothringen, Keramik, Glas, Möbel, Gemälde, Plastik, Schmuck, Plakate," Mainz am Rhein: Verlag Philipp von Zabern, 1980, p. 365, cat. no. 409.

French Art Nouveau Ceramic Vase by Bussière

French Art Nouveau Ceramic Vase by Bussière

A French Art Nouveau ceramic vase designed by Ernest Bussière and produced by Keller et Guérin, modeled foliate motif in high relief with green and purple glaze. A similar vase was shown at the Exposition de l'Ecole de Nancy in Paris in 1903 (see The Paris Salons 1895-1915, Vol. IV: Ceramics and Glass, by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors' Club, 1998, p. 260).

French Art Nouveau Ceramic Vase by Bussière

French Art Nouveau Ceramic Urn by Majorelle & Mougin

A French Art Nouveau ceramic urn designed by Louis Majorelle and produced by Mougin, featuring swirls of blue on a beige and ash-colored ground, with a snail at at the base. Similar piece pictured in: "Les Frères Mougin, sorciers du grand feu: gres et porcelaine 1898-1950" by Jacques G. Peiffer, p. 157.

French Art Nouveau Ceramic Urn by Majorelle & Mougin

French Art Nouveau Ceramic Vase by de Feure

A French Art Nouveau porcelain vase by Georges de Feure, featuring a blue and pink floral decoration on a glazed cream-white ground. Made for La Maison Art Nouveau Bing. Similar vase in the collection of the Musée des Arts Décoratifs. Similar vases pictured in: "Art Nouveau Bing: Paris Style 1900" by Gabriel Weisberg, p. 204, pl. 198.

French Art Nouveau Ceramic Vase by de Feure

French Art Nouveau Ceramic "Gourd" Vase by Ernest Bussière

A French Art Nouveau ceramic "Gourd" vase designed by Ernest Bussière and produced by Keller et Guérin, featuring stylized high-relief berries on the gourd form, with green and purple enameled glazes. This vase was shown at the Exposition de l''Ecole de Nancy in Paris in 1903 (see "The Paris Salons 1895-1915, Vol. IV: Ceramics and Glass," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1998, p.261).

French Art Nouveau Ceramic 'Gourd' Vase by Ernest Bussière

French Art Nouveau Ceramic Vase by Bussière

A French Art Nouveau vase designed by Ernest Bussière and produced by Keller et Guérin, depicting two lizards in high relief wrapped around the rim. The vase features iridescent milky-green and mauve glazes with iridescent highlights. A similar vase was shown at the Exposition de l''Ecole de Nancy in Paris in 1903 (see "The Paris Salons 1895-1915, Vol. IV: Ceramics and Glass," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1998, p.260).

French Art Nouveau Ceramic Vase by Bussière

French Art Nouveau Ceramic Vase by Bussière

A French Art Nouveau vase by Keller and Guérin, from a design by Ernest Bussière, featuring the form of a closed flower in relief, with iridescent milky-green and mauve glazes. A similar vase was shown at the Exposition de l''Ecole de Nancy in Paris in 1903 (see "The Paris Salons 1895-1915, Vol. IV: Ceramics and Glass," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1998, p. 260).

 French Art Nouveau Ceramic Vase by Bussière

French Art Nouveau "Ombellifère" Ceramic Vase by Bussière

A French Art Nouveau iridescent glazed ceramic "Ombellifère" vase designed by Ernest Bussière and produced by Keller et Guérin, depicting ombelle blossoms in low relief, with six flowers whose stems extend away from the body of the vase to form delicate handles. A similar vase was shown at the Exposition de l''Ecole de Nancy in Paris in 1903 (see "The Paris Salons 1895-1915, Vol. IV: Ceramics and Glass," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1998, p.260).

French Art Nouveau 'Ombellifère' Ceramic Vase by Bussière

French Art Nouveau Ceramic Vase by Lachenal

A French Art Nouveau ceramic vase by Edmond Lachenal, featuring a stylistic depiction of leaves and vines with intricate piercing and carving in a graduated light green to green glaze. A similar vase is pictured in: "The Paris Salons 1895-1915, Vol. IV: Ceramics and Glass" by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1998, p. 266 (Grès vase, from La Société Nationale des Beaux-Arts, 1898); and in: "Edmond Lachenal and His Legacy," by Martin Eidelberg and Claire Cass, New York: Jason Jacques Gallery Press, 2007, p. 81, cat. no. 12.

French Art Nouveau Ceramic Vase by Lachenal

French Art Nouveau Ceramic Vase by Bussière

A French Art Nouveau ceramic vase designed by Ernest Bussière and produced by Keller et Guérin. The vase is decorated with vegetal forms and has a glaze of pale green with traces of purple. A similar vase was shown at the Exposition de l''Ecole de Nancy in Paris in 1903 (see "The Paris Salons 1895-1915, Vol. IV: Ceramics and Glass," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1998, p.260).

French Art Nouveau Ceramic Vase by Bussière

"Tale of Genji" Commode by Émile Gallé

A French Art Nouveau marquetry commode by Émile Gallé. With original key. The syncretic influence of Japanese art is keenly felt in Gallé''s commode. The beginning of Galle''s fascination with Japanese art can be traced back to his friendship with Hokkai Takashima (1850-1931), a fellow botanist and member of the École de Nancy. Their botanical dialogue was facilitated by the Shokobutsu mei-i, a book of Japanese names for botanical species. It is from Hokkai that Gallé gained a spiritual and symbolic understanding of nature. Along with other École de Nancy artists, Hokkai and Gallé exhibited together in the display window of René Wiener''s papeterie. The store served as the office of Wiener''s arts journal, the Nancy artiste, which regularly featured on its covers contemporary examples of Gansai (Japanese watercolor), Byobu (folding screens) from the Rinpa school, Sumi-e (ink painting), and Ukiyo-e (woodblock prints). As a show of gratitude, Hokkai bequeathed a vast art book collection to Wiener. It is from this record that we know with certainty of which Japanese artists Gallé had knowledge. One of the books in Hokkai''s collection was Hokusai''s Les cent paysages du Fuji (Fugaku hyakkei.) This 1835 expansion of Hokusai''s 36 views of Mount Fuji contained more elaborate iterations of his original compositions. The commode features two drawers and four cabriole legs. ... The front of the drawers features a marquetry panel with mountains, unkai (sea of clouds) and usugumo (wisps of clouds) motifs. It is likely from works like Hokusai''s Yama mata yama (Mountains Upon Mountains) that Gallé assimilated the unkai (??) motif. The Yama mata yama is the album''s only zenithal view, allowing this phenomenon which is normally only visible from high elevations. On the top of the commode, a sunset mirage overlooks the entire scene. Meanwhile in the foreground, Gallé has included a usugumo motif rendered in warm brown wood. The wisps of cloud motif originates in a stanza in the Tale of Genji in his mourning for Fujitsubo. Those thin wisps of cloud trailing there over Mountains caught in sunset light Seem to wish to match their hue To the sleeves of the bereaved. There is a distinct temporal quality in the commode''s composition. The left side panel depicts a diurne while the right side panel depicts a nocturne. The juxtaposition of day and night in Japanese ukiyo-e was a subject much beloved by Hokusai and Hiroshige and was termed chuya (chu meaning day and ya meaning night). The Japanese nocturne was clearly a subject of great fascination to Gallé as well as evidenced by his "Nuit Japonais" vase. A similar commode is pictured in: "Gallé Furniture", by Alastair Duncan and Georges de Bartha, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 2012, p. 329, plate 15.

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'Tale of Genji' Commode by Émile Gallé

"Aux Grenouilles" Umbrella Stand, by Emile Gallé

French Art Nouveau marquetry "Aux Grenouilles" umbrella stand, by Emile Gallé. This stand for umbrellas and walking sticks incorporates frog (Grenouille) handles and feet in cast bronze, a decorative fillip that provides an otherwise utilitarian piece of furniture with a novel and charming appeal. The cabinet''s feet are syntheses of the legs of a pickerel frog and the feet of a lion. While Galle''s artistic antecedents created chimeric creatures of their own, their fabrication was more of a fantasy than a representation of reality. By the turn of the century, the rapidly developing field of microbiology had rendered the creation of chimeras a foreseeable event. The writings and discoveries of Louis Pasteur added an entirely new class of symbols to Galle''s oeuvre. Galle wrote of Pasteur''s discoveries "we can decipher, behind the chimeric anatomies, the realities that have become manifest, submitted, cataloged, grown in test tubes." In 1892, Galle honored Pasteur for his contributions to science with a vase. The vase is decorated with all manners of mythological creatures and microorganisms. In the cabinet''s "Grenouilles" feet, the artist syncretizes the symbols of two different "currents." The morphology of the lion''s paw offers the viewer a "peaceful stream of our predilections." The lion paw with its hallowed history calls to mind the conservative values of nobil ... ity and honor. By comparison, the hind legs of the pickerel frog originate from the "fast...deep…[and] powerful" current of modernity that offers symbols free from prescribed values. In the hands of Galle''s genius, these symbols generate all manners of novel methods of furniture construction that are evident. The cabinet features two doors opening to reveal two shelves. The left door is veneered with two dragonflies that dart amongst the pickerel rush. This American aquatic plant was popular amongst French horticulturalists as a staple in ornamental fish ponds. Galle''s "Aux Grenouilles" design was the only instance in which Galle represented the pickerel rush. The Grenouille cabinet is a rare example of Galle''s use of sand shading. This eighteenth-century technique involves the submersion of veneer pieces in hot sand. This provides a subtle gradation that is visible in the outer serrated margin of the pickerel leaf and the background of the mushroom landscape. The upper right-hand drawer is decorated with a frieze of carved wood arrowheads that wraps around the cabinet''s sides. The arrowheads are furled into arabesques that echo the dragonflies in the gallery. Similar "Aux Grenouilles" umbrella stand pictured in Gallé Furniture, by Alastair Duncan and Georges de Bartha, Antique Collectors'' Club, Page 287, Plate 5.

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'Aux Grenouilles' Umbrella Stand, by Emile Gallé

French Art Nouveau Bronze Vase by Korschann

A French Art Nouveau vase by Charles Korschann in gilt-bronze. The vase has a diamond-shaped base that tapers to a narrow rounded top, where it intersects with swirling stems and flower buds that form the handle, and features sculpted decoration in relief. On the front, we see a nude female figure emerging from a field of poppies with flowers in her long, flowing hair. The composition is all about movement and abundance, with the entire space carpeted in flowers and the maiden''s hair spilling out over the frame. The reverse, on the other hand, is more sedate and controlled, depicting a stylized arrangement of flower buds, stems and leaves in a structured, ordered composition, executed in a lower relief with thin incised lines echoing the shape of the three flower buds like ripples in the water. The vase combines many common motifs from Symbolist and Art Nouveau design: bats (shown in relief on the top), poppies and seductive women, or femmes fatales. Together, they evoke a mysterious dream-state, suggested in the identification of poppies with opiates and bats with the night.

French Art Nouveau Bronze Vase by Korschann

Art Nouveau Silver and Enamel Vase by Feuillatre

A French Art Nouveau silver and enamel vase by Eugène Feuillatre. The vase is decorated with leafed branches holding pink and gold cloisonné flowers and buds against a sky blue background. It rests on a braided silver stand with three carved feet. The rim is decorated with silver scarabs. A similar vase is pictured in: "Art Nouveau: The French Aesthetic", by Victor Arwas, London: Andreas Papadakis, 2002, p. 397.

Art Nouveau Silver and Enamel Vase by Feuillatre

Bronze Figural Jardiniere by Marionnet

A French Art Nouveau patinated bronze figural jardiniere by Alfred Marionnet. The body of the jardinere is decorated with a nude female embracing the vessel. The woman''s naked feed extend beyond the jardinere''s curving form. The vessel is also decorated with branches that have leaves and berries in relief. The rim of the jardinere is encircled by entwined branches.

Bronze Figural Jardiniere by Marionnet

Bronze Vase by Charles Korschann

A French Art Nouveau patinated bronze vase by Charles Korschann. The vase features an ascending spiraling band decorated with cloud-like swirls, women''s faces, pansy blossoms and stars.

Bronze Vase by Charles Korschann

Austrian Art Nouveau Bust of Ophelia by Josef Öfner

An Austrian Art Nouveau patinated bronze bust of Ophelia by Josef Öfner. Like the sculpture by Maurice Bouval, Öfner depicts Ophelia as a sleeping woman adorned with flowers. The sculpture rests on a painted wood base. The Austrian sculptor Josef Öfner (born in Tannheim, Austria in 1868) studied under Auguste Kühne and Otto König and was active in Vienna around the turn-of-the-20th-century. Like many of his peers, Öfner applied his skills to both decorative and visual arts, producing gilt bronze vases and trays in addition to figural busts. Pictured in: "Dynamic Beauty: Sculpture of Art Nouveau Paris", by Macklowe Gallery, The Studley Press, 2011, p. 218.

Austrian Art Nouveau Bust of Ophelia by Josef Öfner

Tiffany Studios New York "Tel el Amarna" Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York "Tel el Amarna" Favrile glass vase with an iridescent blue body and a brilliant cobalt blue foot and rim featuring an Egyptian-inspired grey and white "Tel el Amarna" motif. Similary decorated vases are pictured in: "The Art of Louis Comfort Tiffany," by Tessa Paul, New York: Exeter Books, 1987, p. 75.

Tiffany Studios New York 'Tel el Amarna' Vase

Tiffany Studios New York "Tel el Amarna" Glass Pedestal Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York Art Nouveau Favrile glass pedestal vase. Iridescent sepia body with iridescent gold shoulders featuring a sage-green and beige Egyptian-inspired ''Tel el Armana" motif. A similar vase is pictured in: "Louis Comfort Tiffany at Tiffany & Co.," by John Loring, New York: Harry N. Abrams, Inc., 2002, p. 160.

Tiffany Studios New York 'Tel el Amarna' Glass Pedestal Vase

Glass "Paperweight" Tiffany Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York Art Nouveau ''paperweight'' glass vase. White blossoms with pink millefiori florets sprinkled throughout a green pulled-leaf motif, all featured on a clear background. The paperweight technique involved fusing thin rods of transparent glass in a variety of colors. The resulting thicker rod was cut into thin pieces and were then worked into clear glass. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: "Louis Comfort Tiffany at Tiffany & Co.," by John Loring, New York: Harry N. Abrams, Inc., 2002, p. 158.

Glass 'Paperweight' Tiffany Vase

Tiffany Studios New York Art "Peacock Eye" Glass Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York Art Nouveau "Peacock Eye" glass vase by Louis Comfort Tiffany. Decorated with blue peacock eye feathers on an iridescent blue and green ground.

Tiffany Studios New York Art 'Peacock Eye' Glass Vase

Tiffany Studios New York Favrile Sprinkler Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York decorated Favrile glass rose water sprinkler vase. The vase is iridescent gold, with undertones of pink and blue. This "gooseneck" design is considered one of Tiffany''s most original and delicate forms, with a molded peacock feather decoration that circles the bulbous portion of the vase and continues along the mouth until fading in the neck. The "gooseneck" design is considered one of Tiffany''s most original and delicate forms, inspired by Persian rosewater sprinklers. Tiffany first became familiar with the rosewater sprinkler through his early mentorship by Edward C. Moore of Tiffany and Company. Moore was a dedicated collector of Oriental art and a significant influence on Tiffany''s aesthetic. Moore''s 16th-century Persian rosewater sprinkler is now on view at the Metrpolitan Museum of Art. According to folklore, Persian rosewater sprinklers were used as "containers for tears." The vessel, named ashkdan, was meant to collect the sorrows of wives separated from their husbands. The story goes that a husband who had to go away for a prolonged period on business, war, or pilgrimage to Mecca gave an ashkdan to his wife so that she could weep into it during his absence and consequently prove how unhappy she had been without him. Tiffany promoted his rosewater sprinklers by using them as props in his infamous Egyptian Fete. An Egyptian slave girl, ... played by Tiffany''s friend Ethel Whitman, sprinkled rosewater to herald the entrance of Cleopatra. A similar sprinkler is pictured in: "Tiffany Favrile Art Glass", by Moise S. Steeg, Jr., Atglen, PA: Schiffer Publishing, Ltd., 1997, p. 33.

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Tiffany Studios New York Favrile Sprinkler Vase

Tiffany Studios New York "Tel el Amarna" Vase

A rare and monumental Tiffany Studios New York "Tel el Amarna" Favrile glass vase with an iridescent cobalt blue body and a brilliant turquoise blue foot and rim. Vases with zigzag decoration such as this have been commonly called "Tel el Amarna," after the decorative motifs of ancient Egypt. However, recent research has shown that Tiffany actually intended these vases to be referred to as "Byzantine," with the exception of vases featuring the brilliant blue color associated with the blue faience of the Eighteenth Dynasty of Amarna, Egypt, circa 1346 BC. This is the largest and most brilliantly colored vase of this genre that Macklowe Gallery has had the privilege of owning in our 50 years specializing in the artistic glass of Louis Comfort Tiffany. Similary decorated vases are pictured in: "The Art of Louis Comfort Tiffany", by Tessa Paul, New York: Exeter Books, 1987, p. 75.

Tiffany Studios New York 'Tel el Amarna' Vase

Tiffany Studios New York American "Lava" Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York American Art Nouveau "Lava" vase A visit to Mount Etna in Sicily during one of its eruptions is said to have inspired Tiffany to capture in glass the force and beauty of the molten volcanic flows and basaltic rock formations that he observed there. The free-form abstract drippings of gold molten glass and the speckled blue and gold ground recreate the naturalistic effects of flowing lava and make this vase an exceptional example of the form. Provenance: The Garden Museum Collection, Matsue, Japan and Important Art Nouveau from the Private Collection of Lloyd & Barbara Macklowe at Sotheby''s 1995 This vase is pictured in: "A Selection of 300 Works From Louis C. Tiffany Garden Museum," by Takeo Horiuchi, Japan: Greco Corporation Fine Art Department, 2001, p. 250. A similar piece is also in the collection of the Chrysler Museum in Norfolk, VA: "The Tiffany Collection of the Chrysler Museum at Norfolk," by Paul E. Doros, Richmond, VA: W. M. Brown & son, Inc., 1978, p. 70, plate 69. Also pictured in "Tiffany Favrile Glass and the Quest of Beauty," by Martin Eidelberg, page 29, plate 28.

Tiffany Studios New York American 'Lava' Vase

Tiffany Studios "Cypriote" Miniature Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York glass "Cypriote" vase, featuring a mottled and multi-textured lava-like finish, with an uneven border. The vase has a dark background with iridescent green, blue, purple and metallic swirls. Cypriote is a textured glass achieved at Tiffany Glass and Decorating Company by rolling glass over a marble or iron surface covered with pulverized bits of the same glass. Its iridescence and bubbles resembled the decomposed surface of Roman glass discovered during archeological explorations on the island of Cyprus, hence its name. Lava glass evolved from Cypriote glass by using thicker, brighter glass and dripping golden glass irregularly over the surface. A similar vase is pictured in: "The Art of Glass: Art Nouveau to Art Deco" by Victor Arwas, London: Andreas Papadakis, 1996, p. 40, plate 50.

Tiffany Studios 'Cypriote' Miniature Vase

"Flower Form" Glass Vase by Tiffany

An American Art Nouveau Favrile glass "Flower Form" vase by Tiffany Studios New York. The upper portion of the vase is ornamented with green pulled feather decoration, imitative of leaves, against a graduated iridescent gold and rose colored ground and sits atop a translucent green stem that extends upwards from an iridescent gold foot. Favrile is the trade name Tiffany gave to his blown art glass. The name derives from the Latin word fabrilis, meaning "made by hand." The technique was developed at Tiffany Furnaces in the mid-1890s using filaments from batches of differently colored glass and working the material while the glass was still molten. Ornamentation was added before the piece had its final shape, so that the decoration became fully integrated into the vessel. Favrile glass vases in the shapes of stylized flowers were among the earliest creations of the Tiffany Glass and Decorating Company, forerunner of Tiffany Studios. Initial examples of this technique date from approximately 1894, although later pieces show greater refinement. Flower forms have great variety in stem length and rim shape.

'Flower Form' Glass Vase by Tiffany