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French Art Nouveau Games Table by Louis Majorelle

A French Art Nouveau games table by Louis Majorelle, featuring an inlaid marquetry top and carved legs and skirt. The marquetry decoration features stems, leave and, flowers around a central, bordered section. There is also marquetry decoration on the table skirt. The carving on the skirt and table legs features three-leaf clovers, which climb the legs and end in flower buds. A similar table is pictured in "Majorelle - Nancy: décorations d''intérieurs: meubles, tentures, bronzes, ferronneries" (the 1906 Majorelle catalogue).

French Art Nouveau Games Table by Louis Majorelle

Art Nouveau Bronze and Favrile Glass Table Candelabrum by Tiffany.

An American Art Nouveau patinated bronze and favrile glass mounted table candelabrum by Tiffany Studios New York. The candelabrum has six arms. Each candle holder is decorated with green favrile jewels. A similar candelabrum is pictured in: Alastair Duncan, "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models", Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club Ltd., 2007, p. 385, plate 1571.

Art Nouveau Bronze and Favrile Glass Table Candelabrum by Tiffany.

Louis Majorelle French Art Nouveau "Orchid" Table

A French Art Nouveau two-tiered ""Caltha des Marais" table with ormolu mounts by Louis Majorelle. The table was created at the height of Majorelle''s most fertile period. While pastiches marked Majorelle''s early career, Majorelle''s mature style reduced the excessive ornament of the ancien regime into the fluid line of modernity. This reduction is most apparent in the table''s skirt, where the baroque swag motif transforms into a graduating concave form. The table''s ormolu mounts are bereft of foliate scrolls and grotesque motifs. Instead, Majorelle''s sophisticated naturalism takes inspiration from the flowers of his native Nancy. Marsh marigolds form the top of each mount. Among the few flowers to grow in the caliginous marshes, their yellow petals are a welcome respite to the eye. So loved was the marsh marigold that Shakespeare proclaimed they grew at heaven''s gate, "Hark, hark! The lark at heaven''s gate sings...His steeds to water at those springs, On chaliced flowers that lies; And winking Mary-buds begin, To ope their golden eyes." The marsh marigolds terminate in "saggitaire fleche d''eau" or arrowhead leaves. Both flowers were endemic to lakes in the Vosges region. The tabletop is set with Amboyna burl veneer. Amboyna veneer is among the world''s rarest and most expensive veneers — holding the distinction of being the original wood used on Rolls Royce dashboards. ... Against the sobriety of the walnut skirt, the Amboyna burl gives the table an air of luxury. A similar table is pictured in: "The Paris Salons 1895-1915, Vol. III: Furniture," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1996, p. 396 (Chairs and tables Salon, 1904); and in: "Louis Majorelle: Master of Art Nouveau Design," by Alastair Duncan, New York: Harry N. Abrams, Inc., 1991, plate 57.

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Louis Majorelle French Art Nouveau 'Orchid' Table

French Art Nouveau Games Table by Gallé

A French Art Nouveau games table by Emile Gallé, featuring inlaid fruitwood marquetry depicting thistles and card suit symbols. The table''s apron has a series of carved card suit symbols on all four sides. A similar table is pictured in: "Gallé Furniture" by Alastair Duncan and Georges de Bartha, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 2012, p. 130, plate 1.

French Art Nouveau Games Table by Gallé

French Art Nouveau Table by Majorelle

A French Art Nouveau table by Louis Majorelle. The table top is decorated with leaves and flowering vines in fruitwood marquetry. The table''s marquetry sides are ornamented with a band of orchids.

French Art Nouveau Table by Majorelle

French Art Nouveau Wooden "Ombelle" Table by Emile Gallé

A French Art Nouveau "Ombelle" carved walnut table, by Emile Gallé. The table is decorated with fruitwood marquetry featuring a butterfly alighting on an ombelle blossom and has three carved feet. A similar table is pictured in: "Gallé Furniture" by Alastair Duncan and Georges de Bartha, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 2012, p. 202, plate 182.

French Art Nouveau Wooden 'Ombelle' Table by Emile Gallé

French Art Nouveau Wooden Table by Louis Majorelle

A French Art Nouveau mahogany center table by Louis Majorelle, the rounded top above a slightly bowed frieze, over downswept tapering channeled legs joined by a conforming undertier, ending in attenuated foliate cast sabots. A similar table is pictured in "Majorelle - Nancy: décorations d''intérieurs: meubles, tentures, bronzes, ferronneries" (the 1906 Majorelle catalogue) .

French Art Nouveau Wooden Table by Louis Majorelle

French Art Nouveau Games Table by Gallé

A French Art Nouveau games table in cedar and walnut by Emile Gallé, featuring inlaid marquetry when closed and open. When closed, the marquetry decoration is of tree branches with buds and flowers and can serve as an end table. Opened, the motif is more foliate. A similar table is pictured in: "Gallé Furniture" by Alastair Duncan and Georges de Bartha, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 2012, p. 134, plates 8 and 8a.

French Art Nouveau Games Table by Gallé

French Art Nouveau Pedestal by Majorelle

A French Art Nouveau two-tier wooden pedestal by Louis Majorelle, featuring a triangular top, a clover-shaped second tier and three sinuous, carved supports. A similar table is pictured in "Majorelle - Nancy: décorations d''intérieurs: meubles, tentures, bronzes, ferronneries" (the 1906 Majorelle catalogue).

French Art Nouveau Pedestal by Majorelle

French Art Nouveau Table by Louis Majorelle

A French Art Nouveau mahogany two-tiered square table by Louis Majorelle, featuring featuring a detailed border on the top tier and gilt bronze sabots on the legs. A similar table is pictured in "Majorelle - Nancy: décorations d''intérieurs: meubles, tentures, bronzes, ferronneries" (the 1906 Majorelle catalogue).

French Art Nouveau Table by Louis Majorelle

Majorelle Table with Detailed Border

A French Art Nouveau mahogany table by Louis Majorelle, featuring a detailed border on the top tier and gilt bronze sabots on the legs. A similar table is pictured in "Majorelle - Nancy: décorations d''intérieurs: meubles, tentures, bronzes, ferronneries" (the 1906 Majorelle catalogue).

Majorelle Table with Detailed Border

French Art Nouveau Table by Majorelle

A French Art Nouveau marquetry walnut and macassar ebony salon table by Louis Majorelle. The table top is decorated with leaves and vines. The legs have carved flowers. Pictured in "Louis Majorelle: Master of Art Nouveau Design" by Alastair Duncan, Harry N. Abrams, New York, Publishers, page 204 (plate 131, Salon furniture).

French Art Nouveau Table by Majorelle

French Art Nouveau Side Table by Edouard Colonna

A French Art Nouveau mahogany side table with carved decoration in an abstract curvilinear vegetal motif by Edouard Colonna (1862-1948). Along with Louis Comfort Tiffany, Edouard Colonna was one of the main designers who worked for Siegfried Bing and who, under Bing''s guidance, was responsible for the creation of what is known today as the Modern Style, or Art Nouveau. Colonna is remembered for his tasteful elegance and his use of abstract forms to create a graceful linear rhythm and dynamic intertwining lines. While he occasionally started with a floral motif, Colonna abstracted nature to create the impression of a flower bud or bloom held within a carefully constructed geometric scheme. This design scheme is evident in the delicate carvings ornamenting each leg of the table and in the overall rhythm of the piece. Colonna furniture, jewelry and designs for small objects like scarf and money holders would become the backbone of Bing''s business. By 1898 a number of his works were on display at Bing''s L''Art Nouveau. A similar table is pictured in: "The Paris Salons 1895-1915, Vol. III: Furniture," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1996, p. 109.

French Art Nouveau Side Table by Edouard Colonna

Gueridon Table by Louis Majorelle

A French Art Nouveau marble top guéridon by Louis Majorelle. The legs, apron and cross piece of this triangular table are carved with flowers, vines and leaves. Fashioned of marble and carved and molded mahogany, the Chevrefuille guéridon''s sophisticated and dynamic design is enhanced by the sinuous curves of its chevrefuille (honeysuckle) motif. In this piece, Majorelle breathes new life into old tradition.The tabletop is inset with the highest grade rosso di verona marble: white veined orange nodules set within a red matrix. The guéridon''s top, apron, legs and stretcher are carved with chevrefuille (honeysuckle) motif. The two words that make up chevrefoil, chevre (from chevreuil (roe deer)) and feuille (leaf), reveal the vine''s negative connotation within French culture. Chevreuil fauns putatively became intoxicated from the shoots of the chevrefeuille. The chevreuil was so named after the chevre (goat) due to its goat like head. The goat with its nineteenth century evocation of the occult and sexuality only added to the plant''s profanity. The Chevrefuille guéridon refers to Marie de France''s thirteenth century "Chevrefeuille", a French variation of the Tristan Legend. Majorelle had previously created furniture based on the flowers of the Tristan legend, but none so magnificently convey the essence of the story as this guéridon. With the ubiquity of Wagner''s Tri ... stan und Isolde in fin-de-siecle France, contemporary artistic circles would have easily understood the work''s iconography. Isolde had told Tristan that if a chevrefuille (honeysuckle vine) wraps itself around a branch of hazelwood (noisitier), the two could not be separated without killing them both. While lying in wait for Isolde, Tristan carves a line into a hazelwood branch and plants it along her courtly procession: "Belle amie, ainsi en est-il de nous: Ni vous sans moi, ni moi sans vous!" "Beautiful friend so it is with us: neither you without me, or me without you." After the lover''s commit suicide, a hazel entwined by a honeysuckle emerge from their grave despite King Mark''s attempt to exterminate them. Despite the illicit nature of the lover''s affair, the couple never consummate, thus maintaining Isolde''s virginity. The honeysuckle''s deforms the hazel tree, minimizing its utility. Through the form of the table and the honeysuckle''s iconographic meaning, Majorelle creates drama between the sacred and the profane. The form of the guéridon evokes the architecture of the gothic church, from the reuleaux shape of the tabletop to the y-shaped dome of the stretcher. The honeysuckle twists about the table without corrupting the table''s divine form, thereby creating the purity of the union in death. This message was communicated in "Liebestod", the climactic end of Tristan und Isolde that literally means love-death. A similar gueridon appears in "Majorelle - Nancy: décorations d''intérieurs: meubles, tentures, bronzes, ferronneries" (the 1906 Majorelle catalogue).

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Gueridon Table by Louis Majorelle

French Art Nouveau Dragonfly Table by Émile Gallé.

A French Art Nouveau two tiered table by Émile Gallé. The table''s four legs are the carved bodies of dragonflies, their wings outstretched and frozen mid-flight. The table top rests on the dragonflies'' heads and wings, with a fluid curvature in the corners creating a crown for the winged creatures'' heads. Marquetry on the table top depicts flowers on long-leafed stems, with shadows of foliage in the background. Decoration in darker tones and larger, starker motifs, decorate the lower tier, playing on the shadows in which it is naturally shrouded. The dragonfly works of Gallé''s provoked very strong critical reaction when they were debuted in 1900, with champions of Art Nouveau lauding the modernity of the dragonfly as caryatid, while detractors were horrified by the very idea of insects as table legs. Time has certainly found favor with this design, as it has found pride of place in museum collections worldwide. A similar table is pictured in: "Gallé Furniture," by Alastair Duncan and Georges de Bartha, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 2012, p. 207, plate 192a.

French Art Nouveau Dragonfly Table by Émile Gallé.

"Aux Nénuphars" Two-Tier Table by Majorelle

Table Aux Nénuphars – A French Art Nouveau two-tier mahogany, tamarind wood and gilt bronze table by Louis Majorelle in the "water lily" motif, featuring applied bronze lily pad and vine decoration. The organic shape and rounded dip in each of the table''s two tiered planes mimics the appearance of a water lily suspended in water, creating a beautiful cohesion in the design. Known as the master furniture maker of the Art Nouveau style, Louis Majorelle was the recipient of the Grand Prize at the St. Louis World''s Fair, and international acclaim at the Paris Exposition Universelle of 1900. He remains among the most sought after designers of the early 20th century, and the most celebrated of the Nancy Art Nouveau artists. Those works by Majorelle that feature gilt bronze accents, produced by his team of highly skilled craftsman with the utmost attention to detail, are considered the most exceptional of the artist''s oeuvre, and are among the most collectible. A similar table is pictured in: "The Paris Salons 1895-1915, Vol. III: Furniture", by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1996, p. 382, and in: "Majorelle - Nancy: décorations d''intérieurs: meubles, tentures, bronzes, ferronneries" (the 1906 Majorelle catalogue) -- see Cabinet de Travail "Nénuphars".

 'Aux Nénuphars' Two-Tier Table by Majorelle

French Art Nouveau Triangular Table by Louis Majorelle

A triangular French Art Nouveau table by Louis Majorelle. This two-tiered triangular table is made of mahogany. Its carved legs are finished with gilt bronze sabots. A similar table is pictured in: "The Paris Salons 1895-1915, Vol. III: Furniture," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1996, p. 413 (Pedestals, La Société des Artistes Décoratuers, 1910).

French Art Nouveau Triangular Table by Louis Majorelle

French Art Nouveau Table by Louis Majorelle

A French Art Nouveau table by Louis Majorelle. This two-tiered mahogany table is carved with vegetal forms and flowers. The three legs are also carved, and the top is composed of beautifully grained wood.

French Art Nouveau Table by Louis Majorelle

"Eighteen-Light Lily" Tiffany Lamp

A Tiffany Studios New York Favrile glass and patinated bronze "Eighteen-light Lily" lamp with 18 golden iridescent glass "Lily" shades suspended over a patinated bronze "Lily Pad" base. Tiffany took this model to the Paris and Turin World''s Fairs around the turn of the century, where the American lamp made waves in the French Art Nouveau movement. Praised for its elegance, the Tiffany "Lily" has been called the "Aristocrat of the Garden." This particular lamp is of special historical importance, even compared with other models of the same design, because it is one of the earliest examples of the "Eighteen-Light Lily." It is outfitted with shades of particular delicacy and iridescence that would have accommodated the weak light from the then newly-invented light bulbs. The shades are mounted on slender curving stems that grow out of a base in the shape of water lily flowers and pads. A similar lamp is pictured in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988, p. 80, plate 313.

'Eighteen-Light Lily' Tiffany Lamp

French Art Nouveau "Pivoines" Table Lamp by Émile Gallé

A French Art Nouveau "Pivoines" table lamp by Émile Gallé. The lamp features a vibrant detailed decoration of crimson red peonies wrapped around the base and shade, surrounded by foliage of plum-colored leaves. The patinated bronze mounts replicate the foliage theme and have scarab beetle terminals. A similar lamp is pictured in A. Duncan, G. de Bartha, "Gallé Le Verre," London, 1984, p. 153, pl. 214.

French Art Nouveau 'Pivoines' Table Lamp by Émile Gallé

Art Nouveau Pedestal Table by Louis Majorelle

A French Art Nouveau pedestal table by Louis Majorelle. The circular two tier table in beech and walnut wood features carved vegetal motifs in bas-relief. Both the table top and the lower shelf are made of beautifully grained wood.

Art Nouveau Pedestal Table by Louis Majorelle

Gauthier Dining Suite

A French Art Nouveau dining suite featuring a dining table with two custom leaves, a set of six mahogany dining chairs with tooled leather and brass tacks and a sideboard featuring a mirror, bronze accents and a marble top by Camille Gauthier & Paul Poinsignon. The sideboard is carved with berries and leaves. It has bronze inlays and a bronze drawer-pull in a sinuous leaf and twisted vine motif. The berries and leaves are also carved into the legs and base of the table. Each tooled leather chair back is affixed with bronze studs and decorated with a different floral image. Dimensions: Dining Table: 29-1/2'''' high x 45'''' wide x 50-1/2'''' long, extends with three leaves to 122-1/2". Dining Chairs: 38¾'''' high x 17'''' wide x 17'''' deep. Sideboard: : 62¾'''' high x 51'''' wide x 21'''' deep.

Gauthier Dining Suite

Louis Majorelle French Art Nouveau Triangular "Gueridon" Table

A French Art Nouveau mahogany triangular gueridon with elegant carved decoration and curvilinear design by Louis Majorelle. Each leg ends in a gilt broze sabot. A similar table is pictured in: "Louis Majorelle: Master of Art Nouveau Design," by Alastair Duncan, New York: Harry N. Abrams, Inc., 1991, p. 108, plate 103.

Louis Majorelle French Art Nouveau Triangular 'Gueridon' Table

French Art Nouveau Table Attributed to Edouard Colonna

An exceptional French Art Nouveau fruitwood table attributed to Edouard Colonna with a black felt center, flanked by a scalloped decoration of vegetal carvings. The slightly curved legs adorn a rich decor of flowers and plants in relief. Colonna is remembered for his tasteful elegance and his use of abstract forms to create a graceful linear rhythm and dynamic intertwining lines. While he occasionally started with a floral motif, Colonna abstracted nature to create the impression of a flower bud or bloom held within a carefully constructed geometric scheme. This design scheme is evident in the delicate carvings ornamenting each leg of the table and in the overall rhythm of the piece. A similar table is pictured in: "The Paris Salons 1895-1915, Vol. III: Furniture," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1996, p. 108.

French Art Nouveau Table Attributed to Edouard Colonna

French Art Nouveau "Danseuse A L''Écharpe No. 12" gilt bronze sculptures by Agathon Léonard.

A French Art Nouveau "Danseuse A L''Écharpe No. 12" gilt bronze sculpture by Agathon Léonard. Originally created as a smaller group of ceramic figures, possibly based on the dancer Loïe Fuller, the series was completed in hard porcelain by the Manufacture Nationale de Sèvres as a fifteen-piece table-top group, "Jeu de L''Echarpe." After acclaim at the Paris Exposition Universelle of 1900, the French foundry Susse Frères produced bronze casts of these, incorporating discreet lighting on some models. Published/Exhibited: Macklowe and Goldring, "Dynamic Beauty: Sculpture of Art Nouveau Paris," 2011, p. 190; Böstge, "Agathon Léonard: Le geste Art Nouveau," 2003, p. 75.

French Art Nouveau 'Danseuse A L''Écharpe No. 12' gilt bronze sculptures by Agathon Léonard.

French Art Nouveau Table by Majorelle

A French Art Nouveau mahogany salon table with fruitwood marquetry by Louis Majorelle. The table top is decorated with leaves and vines. The legs have carved flowers. Provenance Property from the Geyer Collection Louis C. Tiffany Garden Museum Collection, Matsue, Japan Sotheby''s Paris, Chefs-d''Ouevre Art Nouveau, Ancienne Collection du Garden Museum, Japon, February 16, 2013, lot 57 Acquired from the above by the present owner Literature Alastair Duncan, "Louis C. Tiffany: The Garden Museum Collection," Woodbridge, Suffolk, 2004, p. 619 (for related examples from the Garden Museum Collection)

French Art Nouveau Table by Majorelle

Bronze Art Nouveau Figural Candelabrum by Gustav Gurschner

A polychrome bronze Art Nouveau figural candelabrum by Gustav Gurschner. A young woman with brown hair, dressed in a long flowing green skirt, with her breasts exposed, holds a seed capsule in each arm, into which a candle can be inserted. Gurschner displayed his work through the Viennese Secession Group gaining him much acclaim. His depiction of bare breasted women largely survives any stricture in that they have a quiet dignity and poetic charm that never stoops to vulgarization. The woman holds in each arm a lotus flower seed capsule. The size of the capsules relative to her body makes her seem a flower fairy or spirit. A candle would be placed on each capsule, illuminating the dinner table with spectacular charm. In the lead up to World War I, Germany was swept by a wave of artistic nationalism. After spending most of the 19th century dominated by French influence, German artists desired a return to tradition. Integral to German tradition was the vibrant color of Late Medieval wooden sculpture. Since the 14th century, much of antique polychromy had deteriorated considerably, leaving large portions of the wood base exposed. The rich burnt sienna of this woman''s skin may refer to this exposed wood finish. Alternatively it might refer to the skin color of the dancers from the Java Pavillion (1889). After their blockbuster appearance in the World''s Fair, depictions of the d ... ancers abounded in salons. Brown-skinned and black-haired women became appreciated in this context as harbingers of exotic delights. A similar candlestick is pictured in: "The Paris Salons 1895-1915, Vol. V: Objects d''Art and Metalware," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1999, p. 305 Provenance Rudi Schmutz, Vienna Acquired from the above by the present owner, circa 1980s Literature Alastair Duncan, Art Nouveau Sculpture, New York, 1978, p. 49 Wolf Uecker, Art Nouveau and Art Deco Lamps and Candlesticks, New York, 1986, p. 15 Yvonne Brunhammer and Suzanne Tise, French Decorative Art, the Société des Artistes Décorateurs 1900-1942, Paris, 1990, p. 8 (for the model depicted in the Manuel Orazi poster)

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Bronze Art Nouveau Figural Candelabrum by Gustav Gurschner