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French Art Nouveau Bronze Sculpture by Rivere

A French Art Nouveau patinated bronze sculpture by Théodore Rivie`re, featuring two intricately-sculpted figures from the story of Carthage. The woman has emerald eyes and her crown is accented with rubies. The subject of this figural sculpture is taken from Gustave Flaubert''s novel, "Salammbô." The story takes place between 241 and 238 BC, during the war between Carthage and its mercenaries, who were in revolt. Mâthô, the Lybian rebel chief, fell in love with Salammbô, the daughter of the Carthaginian leader. This scene depicts the moment when the mortally wounded Mâthô dies at Salammbô''s feet, declaring his love for her. The figure of Salammbô, the femme fatale,also inspired other Symbolist artists. Pictured in: "Art Nouveau 1890-1914", V&A exhibit by Paul Greenhalgh, page 122; "Nineteenth Century Sculpture" by Maurice Rheims, p. 372 # 15; and in: "Dynamic Beauty: Sculpture of Art Nouveau Paris" by Macklowe Gallery, The Studley Press, 2011, p. 229.

French Art Nouveau Bronze Sculpture by Rivere

French Art Nouveau Lighted Gilt Bronze Inkwell with Sculpture by Korschann

A French Art Nouveau lighted gilt bronze sculpture by Charles Korschann, depicting a woman holding a bouquet of flowers on a tray with an inkwell on the opposite side.The elegant female form''s bouquet of hydrangeas is wonderfully lit so as to radiate dappled light outward. The disproportionate size of the lady in flowing golden robes implies she is a mythical creature tending to her garden. Pictured in: "Art Nouveau and Art Deco Lighting" by Alastair Duncan, page 129 and in "Dynamic Beauty: Sculpture of Art Nouveau Paris" by Macklowe Gallery, The Studley Press, 2011, p. 164.

French Art Nouveau Lighted Gilt Bronze Inkwell with Sculpture by Korschann

French Art Nouveau Bisque Ceramic Sculpture by Leonard and Sevres titled "Danseuse Tambourin à Droite"

A French Art Nouveau bisque ceramic figural sculpture by Agathon Léonard, titled "La danse du tambourin, tete penchée à droite" ("Tambourine dance, head leaning to the right"), from the series "Le jeu d''écharpe." Le jeu d''écharpe, created by Agathon Léonard at the turn of the 20th century, consists of 15 sculptures of young women in various poses. Some women dance with scarves; others hold musical instruments or carry flaming torches. Each of the 15 dancers is unique in terms of her pose, hair style and dress. Their dresses exhibit fluid drapery with flowing sleeves. The series was produced in both bronze and ceramic. Le jeu d''écharpe was inspired by the dancer Loïe Fuller. Pictured in: "Dynamic Beauty: Sculpture of Art Nouveau Paris" by Macklowe Gallery, The Studley Press, 2011, p. 186; and in: Agathon Léonard: Le geste Art Nouveau, by Ingelore Böstge, Paris: Somogy editions d''art, 2003, p. 52, cat. no. 14.

French Art Nouveau Bisque Ceramic Sculpture by Leonard and Sevres titled 'Danseuse Tambourin à Droite'

French Art Nouveau Gilt Bronze Vide-Poche by Max Blondat

A French Art Nouveau gilt bronze vide poche by Max Blondat, titled "An Embrace." The vide poche features the heads and torsos of a man and a woman sweeping up from the sides of the dish. Each of the lovers has an arm around the other. Pictured in: "Dynamic Beauty: Sculpture of Art Nouveau Paris", by Macklowe Gallery, The Studley Press, 2011, p. 57.

French Art Nouveau Gilt Bronze Vide-Poche by Max Blondat

French Art Nouveau Tray with Sculpted Femme Fleur by Louis Chalon

A French Art Nouveau gilt bronze tray with sculpted femme fleur by Louis Chalon, titled "Pirouetting Femme-fleur." The female nude stands, with upraised arms, on a rose blossom. A vine climbs up her legs, and she wears a foliate wrap on her back. The tray rim is decorated with flowers. Pictured in: "Dynamic Beauty: Sculpture of Art Nouveau Paris", by Macklowe Gallery, The Studley Press, 2011, p. 107.

French Art Nouveau Tray with Sculpted Femme Fleur by Louis Chalon

French Art Nouveau Silvered Figural Sculpture by Leonard

A French Art Nouveau silvered bronze figural sculpture by Agathon Léonard, featuring a woman dancing and playing a tambourine. This figure is one of "Le jeu d''écharpe" (The Scarf Set), originally produced and cast by Sèvres, and awarded a Gold Medal at the 1900 Paris Exposition Universelle. The series was later cast in bronze by the Susse Frères foundry, with special limited editions in silvered bronze, such as this piece. Le jeu d''écharpe, created by Agathon Léonard at the turn of the 20th century, consists of 15 sculptures of young women in various poses. Some women dance with scarves; others hold musical instruments or carry flaming torches. Each of the 15 dancers is unique in terms of her pose, hair style and dress. Their dresses exhibit fluid drapery with flowing sleeves. Le jeu d''echarpe was inspired by the dancer Loïe Fuller. Pictured in "Agathon Léonard: Le geste Art Nouveau" by Ingelore Bostge, page 68 cat. 49.

French Art Nouveau Silvered Figural Sculpture by Leonard

French Art Nouveau Ceramic Covered Jar by Rupert Carabin

A French Art Nouveau ceramic covered jar by Rupert Carabin, depicting a female nude wrapped around a gourd form, with a deep green glaze. All of Carabin''s ceramic work was done by his own hand. This piece was made by Moulines, 20, rue Laffite. Pictured in: "L''oeuvre de Rupert Carabin 1862.1932," by Colette Merklen, page 228 and in "Dynamic Beauty: Sculpture of Art Nouveau Paris," by Macklowe Gallery, The Studley Press, 2011, p. 81.

French Art Nouveau Ceramic Covered Jar by Rupert Carabin

French Art Nouveau Bronze Vase by Korschann

A French Art Nouveau vase by Charles Korschann in gilt-bronze. The vase has a diamond-shaped base that tapers to a narrow rounded top, where it intersects with swirling stems and flower buds that form the handle, and features sculpted decoration in relief. On the front, we see a nude female figure emerging from a field of poppies with flowers in her long, flowing hair. The composition is all about movement and abundance, with the entire space carpeted in flowers and the maiden''s hair spilling out over the frame. The reverse, on the other hand, is more sedate and controlled, depicting a stylized arrangement of flower buds, stems and leaves in a structured, ordered composition, executed in a lower relief with thin incised lines echoing the shape of the three flower buds like ripples in the water. The vase combines many common motifs from Symbolist and Art Nouveau design: bats (shown in relief on the top), poppies and seductive women, or femmes fatales. Together, they evoke a mysterious dream-state, suggested in the identification of poppies with opiates and bats with the night.

French Art Nouveau Bronze Vase by Korschann

French Art Nouveau Bronze Sculpture by Savine

A French Art Nouveau sculpture, "Four Peacocks," by Léopold Savine, depicting the bust of a woman surrounded by four peacocks whose tails form the pedestal on which her bust sits. Executed in patinated and silvered bronze. Pictured in: "Art Nouveau" by Judith Miller, p. 201; "Bronzes: Sculptors and Founders 1830-1930" by Berman, p. 775 # 2854; "Art Nouveau The French Aesthetic" by Victor Arwas page 249; and in: "Dynamic Beauty: Sculpture of Art Nouveau Paris" by Macklowe Gallery, The Studley Press, 2011, p.236.

French Art Nouveau Bronze Sculpture by Savine

French Art Nouveau Gilt Bronze Vide-Poche by Rousseau

A French Art Nouveau gilt bronze figural vide-poche by Loiseau-Rousseau titled "Riding the Wave," with the head of a woman situated below a breaking wave. The vide-poche has the shape of a sea shell. Pictured in: "Dynamic Beauty: Sculpture of Art Nouveau Paris" by Macklowe Gallery, The Studley Press, 2011, p. 202.

French Art Nouveau Gilt Bronze Vide-Poche by Rousseau

French Art Nouveau Bisque Ceramic Sculpture titled "Danseuse Tambourin à Gauche" by Leonard and Sevres

A French Art Nouveau ceramic bisque figural sculpture by Agathon Léonard, featuring a woman dancing with a tambourine, titled "La danse du tambourin, tete penchée à gauche" ("The tambourine dance, head leaning to the left"}, from the series "Le jeu d''écharpe." Le jeu d''écharpe, created by Agathon Léonard at the turn of the 20th century, consists of 15 sculptures of young women in various poses. Some women dance with scarves; others hold musical instruments or carry flaming torches. Each of the 15 dancers is unique in terms of her pose, hair style and dress. Their dresses exhibit fluid drapery with flowing sleeves. The series was produced in both bronze and ceramic. Le jeu d''écharpe was inspired by the dancer Loïe Fuller. Pictured in: "Dynamic Beauty: Sculpture of Art Nouveau Paris" by Macklowe Gallery, The Studley Press, 2011, p. 187; and in: Agathon Léonard: Le geste Art Nouveau, by Ingelore Böstge, Paris: Somogy editions d''art, 2003, p. 51, cat. no. 12.

French Art Nouveau Bisque Ceramic Sculpture titled 'Danseuse Tambourin à Gauche' by Leonard and Sevres

Art Nouveau Bisque Ceramic Sculpture by Agathon Leonard titled "Danseuse au Cothurne"

A French Art Nouveau bisque ceramic figural sculpture by Agathon Léonard, featuring a woman holding her dress with her right hand. Titled "Danseuse au cothurne" from "Le jeu de l''écharpe." This figure is one of the "la danse" (the dance) set, originally produced and cast by Sèvres and presented by the artist at the 1900 Paris Exposition Universelle. A cothurne (English translation cothurnus) was a laced boot worn by actors in Greek and Roman tragedies. Le jeu d''écharpe, created by Agathon Léonard at the turn of the 20th century, consists of 15 sculptures of young women in various poses. Some women dance with scarves; others hold musical instruments or carry flaming torches. Each of the 15 dancers is unique in terms of her pose, hair style and dress. Their dresses exhibit fluid drapery with flowing sleeves. The series was produced in both bronze and ceramic. Le jeu d''echarpe was inspired by the dancer Loïe Fuller. This smaller size series is extremely rare. A similar model is pictured in "Agathon Léonard: Le geste Art Nouveau" by Ingelore Boestge, Somogy editions d''art, Paris 2003, p.51, Plate number 13.

Art Nouveau Bisque Ceramic Sculpture by Agathon Leonard titled 'Danseuse au Cothurne'

French Art Nouveau Silvered Figural Sculpture by Leonard

A French Art Nouveau silvered bronze figural sculpture by Agathon Léonard featuring a woman dancing titled "Danseuse chantant" (singing dancer). This figure is one of "Le jeu d''écharpe" (The Scarf Set), originally produced and cast by Sèvres, and awarded a Gold Medal at the 1900 Paris Exposition Universelle. The series was later cast in bronze by the Susse Frères foundry, with special limited editions in silvered bronze, such as this piece. Le jeu d''écharpe, created by Agathon Léonard at the turn of the 20th century, consists of 15 sculptures of young women in various poses. Some women dance with scarves; others hold musical instruments or carry flaming torches. Each of the 15 dancers is unique in terms of her pose, hair style and dress. Their dresses exhibit fluid drapery with flowing sleeves. Le jeu d''echarpe was inspired by the dancer Loïe Fuller. A similar model is pictured in "Agathon Léonard: Le geste Art nouveau," by Ingelore Boestge, Somogy editions d''art, Paris 2003, p.62, Plate number 35. Provenance: Elizabeth Taylor

French Art Nouveau Silvered Figural Sculpture by Leonard

Art Nouveau Patinated Bronze Figural Sculpture by Ségoffin

A French Art Nouveau patinated bronze figural sculpture, depicting a dancer with scarves and cymbals by Victor Ségoffin (1867-1925). Born in Toulouse, educated at Ecole nationale superieure des Beaux-Arts in Paris under Louis-Ernest Barrias and Pierre-Jules Cavelier, Segoffin won the Prix de Rome for sculpture in 1897.

Art Nouveau Patinated Bronze Figural Sculpture by Ségoffin

Art Nouveau Silver and Enamel Vase by Feuillatre

A French Art Nouveau silver and enamel vase by Eugène Feuillatre. The vase is decorated with leafed branches holding pink and gold cloisonné flowers and buds against a sky blue background. It rests on a braided silver stand with three carved feet. The rim is decorated with silver scarabs. A similar vase is pictured in: "Art Nouveau: The French Aesthetic", by Victor Arwas, London: Andreas Papadakis, 2002, p. 397.

Art Nouveau Silver and Enamel Vase by Feuillatre

Bronze Figural Jardiniere by Marionnet

A French Art Nouveau patinated bronze figural jardiniere by Alfred Marionnet. The body of the jardinere is decorated with a nude female embracing the vessel. The woman''s naked feed extend beyond the jardinere''s curving form. The vessel is also decorated with branches that have leaves and berries in relief. The rim of the jardinere is encircled by entwined branches.

Bronze Figural Jardiniere by Marionnet

Enamel and Bronze "Femme-fleur Lily" by Godet

A French Art Nouveau enameled bronze Femme Fleur by Henri Godet (1863-1937). The sculpture depicts the patinated bronze head and neck of a young woman growing out of an enameled red and yellow lily flower. It rests on a red marble base, with the flower perched on a green enameled leaf decorated with a gilt bronze flower. Literature: Alastair Duncan, "Art Nouveau Sculpture," New York, Rizzoli International, 1978, p. 47, for another example from the collection of Victor Arwas. "Dynamic Beauty: Sculpture of Art Nouveau Paris", Macklowe Gallery, New York, 2011 exhibition catalogue; pp. 133-34 for similar examples from this rare series, and p. 135 for an identical example on another base from a later date.

Enamel and Bronze 'Femme-fleur Lily' by Godet

Bronze Vase by Charles Korschann

A French Art Nouveau patinated bronze vase by Charles Korschann. The vase features an ascending spiraling band decorated with cloud-like swirls, women''s faces, pansy blossoms and stars.

Bronze Vase by Charles Korschann

Austrian Art Nouveau Bust of Ophelia by Josef Öfner

An Austrian Art Nouveau patinated bronze bust of Ophelia by Josef Öfner. Like the sculpture by Maurice Bouval, Öfner depicts Ophelia as a sleeping woman adorned with flowers. The sculpture rests on a painted wood base. The Austrian sculptor Josef Öfner (born in Tannheim, Austria in 1868) studied under Auguste Kühne and Otto König and was active in Vienna around the turn-of-the-20th-century. Like many of his peers, Öfner applied his skills to both decorative and visual arts, producing gilt bronze vases and trays in addition to figural busts. Pictured in: "Dynamic Beauty: Sculpture of Art Nouveau Paris", by Macklowe Gallery, The Studley Press, 2011, p. 218.

Austrian Art Nouveau Bust of Ophelia by Josef Öfner

"Femme au Pieuvre" French Art Nouveau Glazed Ceramic Inkwell by Rupert Carabin

A French Art Nouveau "Femme-Pieuvre," brown glazed ceramic inkwell by Rupert Carabin, wherein a woman ecstatically rips open the head of an octopus, spilling its ink. A beautiful play on an ancient means of sourcing ink, this sculpture''s tranquility and solidity give it the aura of an ancient carving. Pictured in: "The Paris Salons 1895-1914, volume IV: Ceramics and Glass" by Alastair Duncan, p.76; "L''Oeuvre de Rupert Carabin 1862-1932, Catalogue D''exposition, Galerie du Luxembourg", 1974, pp.229 and 232; "Art Nouveau, Sculpture" by Alastair Duncan, Academy Edition, 1978, p.20; and in: "Le Modern style" by Laurence Buffet-Challié, p.74, plat 2.

'Femme au Pieuvre' French Art Nouveau Glazed Ceramic Inkwell by Rupert Carabin

French Art Nouveau Ceramic Inkwell by Carabin

A French Art Nouveau "Femme à la Coloquinte," glazed ceramic inkwell by François-Rupert Carabin. The inkwell features a nude woman embracing an unusually large gourd. A similar sculpture is pictured in: "L''ouevre de Rupert Carabin, 1982-1932," catalogue of the exhibition at le Musée du Luxembourg, Paris, 1974, p. 230, cat. no. 189.

French Art Nouveau Ceramic Inkwell by Carabin

Bronze Portrait of Sarah Bernhardt by Paul François Berthoud

A French Art Nouveau gilt and patinated bronze portrait of Sarah Bernhardt by Paul François Berthoud. Sarah Bernhardt was the most important dramatic actress of the 19th century. She is portrayed here with a jeweled sash and flowing hair, no doubt a reference to her role as Gismonda in the play by Victorien Sardou. A slightly different portrait sculpture of Bernhardt by Berthoud is in the collection of the Musée d''Orsay.

Bronze Portrait of Sarah Bernhardt by Paul François Berthoud

German Art Nouveau Bronze Figural Vide-Poche by Bernhard Hoetger

A German Art Nouveau patinated bronze figural vide poche by Bernhard Hoetger featuring a windblown nude with floral vines climbing her leg and giving her some modesty. Pictured in: "Dynamic Beauty: Sculpture of Art Nouveau Paris", by Macklowe Gallery, The Studley Press, 2011, p. 146.

German Art Nouveau Bronze Figural Vide-Poche by Bernhard Hoetger

French Art Nouveau Bronze Sculpture by Carabin

A French Art Nouveau bronze sculpture of a castanet dancer in motion with flowing gown by Rupert Carabin. This barefoot woman holds her castanets out in front of her. Carabin made a number of sculptures of dancers in different poses.

French Art Nouveau Bronze Sculpture by Carabin

"La Fée" Bronze Sculpture by Louis Chalon

A French Art Nouveau "Fairy" or "La Fée" bronze sculpture by Louis Chalon. A nude female figure stands on an open flower with complex, textured roots. On her back are four "wings" in the shape of orchid leaves. An orchid petal rises from the back of her head. Signed in base of sculpture. The base of the sculpture is marble. A similar sculpture is pictured in: "Dynamic Beauty: Sculpture of Art Nouveau Paris," by Macklowe Gallery, The Studley Press, 2011, p. 106.

'La Fée' Bronze Sculpture by Louis Chalon

French Art Nouveau Patinated Bronze Sculpture by Sarah Bernhardt

A French Art Nouveau patinated bronze sculpture by Sarah Bernhardt. This sculpture is known to be a self-portrait with a chimera personification. The Chimera was, according to Greek mythology, a monstrous fire-breathing hybrid creature of Lycia in Asia Minor, composed of the parts of more than one animal. The term chimera has come to describe any mythical or fictional animal with parts taken from various animals, or to describe anything composed of very disparate parts, or perceived as wildly imaginative, implausible, or dazzling. This work has be accessioned into the permanent collections of The Museum of Fine Art Boston, The Virginia Museum of Fine Art and the Princeton Museum. There was also a sculpture given by the artist to King Edward VII and Queen Alexandra, and it remains in the Royal Collection Trust.

French Art Nouveau Patinated Bronze Sculpture by Sarah Bernhardt

French Art Nouveau Plaster Plaque by Rupert Carabin

A French Art Nouveau plaster plaque, titled "Allegory of Wine," by Rupert Carabin. The plaque, which is painted brown, features two nude women in bas-relief, one seated with her arms extended, the other standing in profile and coyly holding a dish of fruit. The delicate interaction of the two women celebrates the female form and feminine sensuality. Freed from the constraints of corsets and fashion, Art Nouveau sculpture frequently explored the female nude and embued her with a new mystique. Pictured in: "Dynamic Beauty: Sculpture of Art Nouveau Paris", by Macklowe Gallery, The Studley Press, 2011, p. 83.

French Art Nouveau Plaster Plaque by Rupert Carabin

Chalon "Octopus Dancer" Sculpture

A French Art Nouveau gilt bronze figural sculpture by Louis Chalon. Chalon''s dancing woman with an octopus at her feet, one of its tendrils wrapped around her leg, is a pure expression of feminine sensuality. Her veils summon the Orient, imbuing her with exoticism. Her freeform dance movement and extended limbs enact her sexual ecstasy. The piece explores the turn-of-the century fascination with Japanese shunga, artwork that depicts sensual pleasures. Many showed women being engulfed by an octopus in varied and multiple ways. A similar sculpture is pictured in: "Dynamic Beauty: Sculpture of Art Nouveau Paris," by Macklowe Gallery, The Studley Press, 2011, p 101.

Chalon 'Octopus Dancer' Sculpture

French Floriform Candlesticks by Paul Follot

A pair of French Art Nouveau silvered metal floriform candlesticks by Paul Follot. Follot was one of the main artists represented by "La Maison Moderne," a Parisian gallery that championed the avant-garde artists of the day. Follot was one of the few French artists to achieve success in both the Art Nouveau and Art Deco periods, and his work can be found in museum collections worldwide. Similar candlesticks are pictured in: "The Paris Salons 1895-1915, Vol. V: Objects d''Art and Metalware", by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1999, p. 263.

French Floriform Candlesticks by Paul Follot

French Art Nouveau Gilt Bronze Lighted Sculpture of Loie Fuller by Raoul Larche

A French Art Nouveau gilt bronze lighted sculpture, "Loïe Fuller," designed and sculpted by François-Raoul Larche. This is the most famous of all bronzes to be made in the Art Nouveau aesthetic, representing the famous American dancer and choreographer, Loïe Fuller performing one of her dances. Her flowing robes and fabrics conceal two light bulbs. This sculpture has been the subject of numerous museum exhibitions, most notably at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts and the Villa Stuck Museum in Germany.

French Art Nouveau Gilt Bronze Lighted Sculpture of Loie Fuller by Raoul Larche

Paul Follot Coffee and Tea Service

A rare and important French Art Nouveau silvered metal coffee and tea service by Paul Follot. The set includes a tray, tea and a coffee pots, and containers for sugar and cream. The set is decorated with whiplash curves, fabric-like folds and a spray of monnaie du pape ("the Pope''s money") leaves. This set was manufactured by Metallwarren Fabrik, F.w. Quist, Esslingen, Germany. All five pieces are signed "Follot". The service was exhibited at the Salon Décorateurs in 1904. The model is in the Musée d''Orsay, the Victoria and Albert Museum, and the Brohan Museum (Berlin). In the year 2000, an identical set was exhibited in Art Nouveau 1890-1914 at the Victoria & Albert Museum and the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC. Provenance: Purchased in Wiesbaden, Germany from a prominent lady who is now in her late sixties. This tea service, with its original box, was her mother''s wedding gift. Similar set pictured in: "Art Nouveau: The French Aesthetic," by Victor Arwas, p. 393 Art Nouveau Belgium France, by Yvonne Brunhammer, p. 206, pl. 306 "Art Nouveau: 1890-1914," by Paul Greenhalgh, p. 234, pl. 14.13. "The French Decorative Arts, the Societé des Artistes Décorateurs 1900-1942," by Cf. Y. Brunhammer + S. Tise, Paris 1990, p. 16-17. "Art Nouveau," by Judith Miller, page 180. Dimensions: 16¾" wide x 24¼" long (tray)

Paul Follot Coffee and Tea Service

German Art Nouveau Bronze Sculpture by Hoetger

A German Art Nouveau bronze sculpture, "La Pleureuse," by Bernhard Hoetger, depicting a weeping woman with her head in her hands. The sculpture is executed in patinated bronze. Bernhard Hoetger (born 4 May 1874 in Dortmund; died 18 July 1949 in Interlaken) was an important German sculptor, painter and handicrafts artist of the Expressionist movement. The son of a Dortmund blacksmith, he studied stone carving and sculpture in Detmold from 1888 to 1892, before directing a workshop in Rheda-Wiedenbrück. After some time at the Dusseldorf Arts Academy, he took a trip to Paris, where he was deeply influenced by Auguste Rodin. Hoetger''s bronze sculpture of the American dancer Loïe Fuller shows evidence of Rodin''s influence, and marks the height of Hoetger''s accomplishments in the Art Nouveau style. Hoetger resided in Paris and participated in the founding of the Salon d''Automne in 1905. In 1911, Hoetger was employed as professor and "maitre" to the "artistic colony" of Darmstadt, where he remained until 1919. In 1914, inspired by Becker-Modersohn, he traveled to Worpswede. It was here where he met Ludwig Roselius, a German coffee merchant, with whom he would go on to create his masterpiece, Bremen''s Böttcherstraße, in an Expressionist style. In 1949 he settled in Switzerland, where he died.

German Art Nouveau Bronze Sculpture by Hoetger

French Art Nouveau "Danseuse A L''Écharpe No. 12" gilt bronze sculptures by Agathon Léonard.

A French Art Nouveau "Danseuse A L''Écharpe No. 12" gilt bronze sculpture by Agathon Léonard. Originally created as a smaller group of ceramic figures, possibly based on the dancer Loïe Fuller, the series was completed in hard porcelain by the Manufacture Nationale de Sèvres as a fifteen-piece table-top group, "Jeu de L''Echarpe." After acclaim at the Paris Exposition Universelle of 1900, the French foundry Susse Frères produced bronze casts of these, incorporating discreet lighting on some models. Published/Exhibited: Macklowe and Goldring, "Dynamic Beauty: Sculpture of Art Nouveau Paris," 2011, p. 190; Böstge, "Agathon Léonard: Le geste Art Nouveau," 2003, p. 75.

French Art Nouveau 'Danseuse A L''Écharpe No. 12' gilt bronze sculptures by Agathon Léonard.