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French Art Nouveau Bronze Sculpture by Rivere

A French Art Nouveau patinated bronze sculpture by Théodore Rivie`re, featuring two intricately-sculpted figures from the story of Carthage. The woman has emerald eyes and her crown is accented with rubies. The subject of this figural sculpture is taken from Gustave Flaubert''s novel, "Salammbô." The story takes place between 241 and 238 BC, during the war between Carthage and its mercenaries, who were in revolt. Mâthô, the Lybian rebel chief, fell in love with Salammbô, the daughter of the Carthaginian leader. This scene depicts the moment when the mortally wounded Mâthô dies at Salammbô''s feet, declaring his love for her. The figure of Salammbô, the femme fatale,also inspired other Symbolist artists. Pictured in: "Art Nouveau 1890-1914", V&A exhibit by Paul Greenhalgh, page 122; "Nineteenth Century Sculpture" by Maurice Rheims, p. 372 # 15; and in: "Dynamic Beauty: Sculpture of Art Nouveau Paris" by Macklowe Gallery, The Studley Press, 2011, p. 229.

French Art Nouveau Bronze Sculpture by Rivere

French Pâte-de-Verre Plaque by Cros

A French bas-relief glass pâte-de-verre plaque by Henri Cros, depicting a mythical dragon or sea creature in hues of pink, against a crystal-like ground. This is an experimental plaque by the originator of the revival of the ancient pâte-de-verre process.

French Pâte-de-Verre Plaque by Cros

French Art Nouveau Lighted Gilt Bronze Inkwell with Sculpture by Korschann

A French Art Nouveau lighted gilt bronze sculpture by Charles Korschann, depicting a woman holding a bouquet of flowers on a tray with an inkwell on the opposite side.The elegant female form''s bouquet of hydrangeas is wonderfully lit so as to radiate dappled light outward. The disproportionate size of the lady in flowing golden robes implies she is a mythical creature tending to her garden. Pictured in: "Art Nouveau and Art Deco Lighting" by Alastair Duncan, page 129 and in "Dynamic Beauty: Sculpture of Art Nouveau Paris" by Macklowe Gallery, The Studley Press, 2011, p. 164.

French Art Nouveau Lighted Gilt Bronze Inkwell with Sculpture by Korschann

Art Nouveau Gold and Plique-à-Jour Enamel Cockatoo Brooch

An Art Nouveau 18 karat gold and plique-à-jour enamel bird brooch, featuring a stylized depiction of a dimensional cockatoo set on a green and red plique-à-jour enamel foliate panel with gold trim.

Art Nouveau Gold and Plique-à-Jour Enamel Cockatoo Brooch

French Art Nouveau Bisque Ceramic Sculpture by Leonard and Sevres titled "Danseuse Tambourin à Droite"

A French Art Nouveau bisque ceramic figural sculpture by Agathon Léonard, titled "La danse du tambourin, tete penchée à droite" ("Tambourine dance, head leaning to the right"), from the series "Le jeu d''écharpe." Le jeu d''écharpe, created by Agathon Léonard at the turn of the 20th century, consists of 15 sculptures of young women in various poses. Some women dance with scarves; others hold musical instruments or carry flaming torches. Each of the 15 dancers is unique in terms of her pose, hair style and dress. Their dresses exhibit fluid drapery with flowing sleeves. The series was produced in both bronze and ceramic. Le jeu d''écharpe was inspired by the dancer Loïe Fuller. Pictured in: "Dynamic Beauty: Sculpture of Art Nouveau Paris" by Macklowe Gallery, The Studley Press, 2011, p. 186; and in: Agathon Léonard: Le geste Art Nouveau, by Ingelore Böstge, Paris: Somogy editions d''art, 2003, p. 52, cat. no. 14.

French Art Nouveau Bisque Ceramic Sculpture by Leonard and Sevres titled 'Danseuse Tambourin à Droite'

French Art Nouveau Side Chairs by Vallin

A pair of French Art Nouveau side chairs by Vallin, featuring a carved mahogany "Wheat" patterned motif and leather upholstery. Similar chairs are pictured in: "The Paris Salons, 1895-1910, Volume III: Furniture" by Alastair Duncan, Antique Collectors'' Club, Publishers, page 555 (Dining room, collection of Eugène Corbin, Le Salon d''Automne, 1910).

French Art Nouveau Side Chairs by Vallin

French Art Nouveau Games Table by Louis Majorelle

A French Art Nouveau games table by Louis Majorelle, featuring an inlaid marquetry top and carved legs and skirt. The marquetry decoration features stems, leave and, flowers around a central, bordered section. There is also marquetry decoration on the table skirt. The carving on the skirt and table legs feature three-leaf clovers, which climb the legs and end in flower buds. A similar table is pictured in "Majorelle - Nancy: décorations d''intérieurs: meubles, tentures, bronzes, ferronneries" (the 1906 Majorelle catalogue).

French Art Nouveau Games Table by Louis Majorelle

French Art Nouveau Gilt Bronze Vide-Poche by Max Blondat

A French Art Nouveau gilt bronze vide poche by Max Blondat, titled "An Embrace." The vide poche features the heads and torsos of a man and a woman sweeping up from the sides of the dish. Each of the lovers has an arm around the other. Pictured in: "Dynamic Beauty: Sculpture of Art Nouveau Paris", by Macklowe Gallery, The Studley Press, 2011, p. 57.

French Art Nouveau Gilt Bronze Vide-Poche by Max Blondat

French Art Nouveau Tray with Sculpted Femme Fleur by Louis Chalon

A French Art Nouveau gilt bronze tray with sculpted femme fleur by Louis Chalon, titled "Pirouetting Femme-fleur." The female nude stands, with upraised arms, on a rose blossom. A vine climbs up her legs, and she wears a foliate wrap on her back. The tray rim is decorated with flowers. Pictured in: "Dynamic Beauty: Sculpture of Art Nouveau Paris", by Macklowe Gallery, The Studley Press, 2011, p. 107.

French Art Nouveau Tray with Sculpted Femme Fleur by Louis Chalon

French Art Nouveau Tray and Inkwell by Flamand

A French Art Nouveau gilt bronze tray and inkwell by Georges Flamand, with a woman''s face set in leaves with powder blue turquoise cabochon decorations. The inkwell is shaped like a flower. It is titled "Inspiration at Dawn." Pictured in: "Dynamic Beauty: Sculpture of Art Nouveau Paris", by Macklowe Gallery, The Studley Press, 2011, p. 128.

French Art Nouveau Tray and Inkwell by Flamand

Decorative Vase by Daum

A French Art Nouveau wheel-carved cameo footed glass vase by Daum. Deep purple flowers are featured against a plum and blue martelé background. Vases with similar decoration are pictured in: Daum Frères: Maîtres Verriers, 1892-1935, by Katharina Büttiker-Weber, Zurich: Galerie Katharina Büttiker, 1986, cat. nos. 42-44.

Decorative Vase by Daum

French Art Nouveau Gilt Bronze Clock by Dufrène

A French Art Nouveau clock in gilt bronze by Maurice Dufrène with dancing figures modeled by Félix Voulot for the Parisian atelier La Maison Moderne. A similar model of this clock is part of the permanent collection of the Museum fur Kunst und Gewerbe, Hamburg. Signed, "F. Voulot 1900". Pictured in The Paris Salons: 1895-1914, Volume V: Objects d''Art & Metalware, by Alastair Duncan, pages 38 and 227. Also pictured in L''Ofevrerie et Le Bronze, L''Art Decoratif, by Charles Torquet, page 207.

French Art Nouveau Gilt Bronze Clock by Dufrène

French Art Nouveau Silvered Figural Sculpture by Leonard

A French Art Nouveau silvered bronze figural sculpture by Agathon Léonard, featuring a woman dancing and playing a tambourine. This figure is one of "Le jeu d''écharpe" (The Scarf Set), originally produced and cast by Sèvres, and awarded a Gold Medal at the 1900 Paris Exposition Universelle. The series was later cast in bronze by the Susse Frères foundry, with special limited editions in silvered bronze, such as this piece. Le jeu d''écharpe, created by Agathon Léonard at the turn of the 20th century, consists of 15 sculptures of young women in various poses. Some women dance with scarves; others hold musical instruments or carry flaming torches. Each of the 15 dancers is unique in terms of her pose, hair style and dress. Their dresses exhibit fluid drapery with flowing sleeves. Le jeu d''echarpe was inspired by the dancer Loïe Fuller. Pictured in "Agathon Léonard: Le geste Art Nouveau" by Ingelore Bostge, page 68 cat. 49.

French Art Nouveau Silvered Figural Sculpture by Leonard

Art Nouveau Bronze and Favrile Glass Table Candelabrum by Tiffany.

An American Art Nouveau bronze and favrile glass mounted table candelabrum by Tiffany Studios New York. The candelabrum has six arms. Each candle holder is decorated with green favrile jewels. A similar candelabrum is pictured in: Alastair Duncan, "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models", Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club Ltd., 2007, p. 385, plate 1571.

Art Nouveau Bronze and Favrile Glass Table Candelabrum by Tiffany.

Tiffany Studios New York "Tel el Amarna" Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York "Tel el Amarna" Favrile glass vase with an iridescent blue body and a brilliant cobalt blue foot and rim featuring an Egyptian-inspired grey and white "Tel el Amarna" motif. Similary decorated vases are pictured in: "The Art of Louis Comfort Tiffany," by Tessa Paul, New York: Exeter Books, 1987, p. 75.

Tiffany Studios New York 'Tel el Amarna' Vase

Tiffany Studios New York "Tel el Amarna" Glass Pedestal Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York Art Nouveau Favrile glass pedestal vase. Iridescent sepia body with iridescent gold shoulders featuring a sage-green and beige ''Tel el Armana" motif. A similar vase is pictured in: "Louis Comfort Tiffany at Tiffany & Co.," by John Loring, New York: Harry N. Abrams, Inc., 2002, p. 160.

Tiffany Studios New York 'Tel el Amarna' Glass Pedestal Vase

Glass "Paperweight" Tiffany Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York Art Nouveau ''paperweight'' glass vase. White blossoms with pink millefiori florets sprinkled throughout a green pulled-leaf motif, all featured on a clear background. The paperweight technique involved fusing thin rods of transparent glass in a variety of colors. The resulting thicker rod was cut into thin pieces and were then worked into clear glass. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: "Louis Comfort Tiffany at Tiffany & Co.," by John Loring, New York: Harry N. Abrams, Inc., 2002, p. 158.

Glass 'Paperweight' Tiffany Vase

Art Nouveau Green Chrysophrase and Gold Cuff Links

A pair of European Art Nouveau 18 karat gold cuff links with green chrysophrase. The oval-shaped cuff links have 4 cabochon green chrysophrase stones surrounded by high relief engraved scroll work. Double sided.

Art  Nouveau Green Chrysophrase and Gold Cuff Links

Marcus & Co. Art Nouveau Opal and Gold Stick Pin

An American Art Nouveau 18 karat gold stick pin with enameling and black opal by Marcus & Co. The stick pin has a cabochon opal surrounded with four enamel side sections decorated with gold relief arabesque designs. The multi-generational New York firm of Marcus & Co was founded by an ambitious young German immigrant who had trained at a prominent Dresden court jeweler. In 1892, after working with Charles Lewis Tiffany, Hermann Marcus and his sons William and George together set up a business that soon became a glittering New York society institution renowned not only for its superb diamonds, colored stones and pearls, but also its instantly recognizable, original design style. The firm produced great jewels in the Art Nouveau and Arts & Crafts sensibility, with George, the artist/designer, drawing inspiration from sources as diverse and exotic as the contemporary French masters, the Moghuls and Maharajahs, the garland style of the Ancien Regime, and the genius of Renaissance goldsmiths. George''s distinctive, confident hand was always discernible in Marcus creations. Working as a team with George, his brother William was a gem and pearl connoisseur who travelled the world hunting fine gem material, including purchasing the entire production of never-before-seen black opal in Lightning Ridge Australia in 1908. Marcus exhibited at the 1900 Exposition Universelle in Paris, and ... their work won prizes at the prestigious Society of Arts & Crafts of Boston. The firm and family were well-known for their charitable activities and promotion of young jewelers such as Raymond Yard.

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Marcus & Co. Art Nouveau Opal and Gold Stick Pin

Lucien Gautrait French Art Nouveau Gold Pendant with Sapphire, Diamonds and Pearl

A French Art Nouveau 18 karat gold pendant with pink sapphire, diamonds and pearl by Lucien Gautrait. The pendant has a pear-cut pink sapphire with an approximate total weight of .80 carat, 2 old European-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of .10 carat, and a baroque pearl drop. The pendant shows an emergent woman with flowing hair and outstretched arms in a euphoric opium-induced state. Art Nouveau 18 karat chain not original to the piece. Pictured in Masterpieces of French Jewelry, by Judith Price, Running Press, 2006, page 48. Pictured in Henri Vever French Jewelry of the Nineteenth Century, Thames Hudson, 2001, page 1110.

Lucien Gautrait French Art Nouveau Gold Pendant with Sapphire, Diamonds and Pearl

André Rambour French Art Nouveau Gold and Enamel Pendant

A French Art Nouveau 18 karat gold and enamel pendant by André Rambour. The pendant depicts a maiden within an enamel iris which is suspended by fancy link chain and an enameled foliate top. Shown in the Poster House (New York) exhibition "Alphonse Mucha: Art Nouveau./Nouvelle Femme," June 20-October 6, 2019.

André Rambour French Art Nouveau Gold and Enamel Pendant

Bronze Nude lighted Sconce on Marquetry Easel by Georges Flamand

A French Art Nouveau bronze draped female nude in the form of a two-light sconce by Georges Flamand. The draped maiden, in a two-color patina, is supporting two lighting elements mounted on a wooden marquetry easel with a floral and thistle motif.

Bronze Nude lighted Sconce on Marquetry Easel by Georges Flamand

Louis Zorra Art Nouveau Diamond, Amethyst, Pearl and Plique-à-Jour Enamel Brooch

An Art Nouveau 18 karat gold and plique à jour brooch with diamond, amethysts and pearl by Louis Zorra. The brooch has an old mine-cut diamond with an approximate total weight of .65 carat, 21 round bezel-set amethysts with an approximate total weight of 1.10 carats, and a hanging, enamel-capped pearl. Similar pictured in "Imperishable Beauty Art Nouveau Jewelry", by Yvonne J. Markowitz and Elyse Zorn Karlin, "MFA Publications Museum of Fine Arts", Boston, 2008, pages 8 and 68. "Zorra was possibly born in Italy, working in Paris during the Art Nouveau period)...he moved to Paris from Asti, Italy, and exhibited at the Salon des artistes français, receiving an honorable mention in 1902." Markowitz and Karlin in Imperishable Beauty, pg. 151.

Louis Zorra Art Nouveau Diamond, Amethyst, Pearl and Plique-à-Jour Enamel Brooch

Marcus & Company Art Nouveau Peridot, Diamond, Gold and Enamel Ring

An American Art Nouveau gold, peridot, diamond and enamel ring by Marcus & Co. The unique Renaissance Revival motif features green enameled 18-karat gold, two round-cut peridots totaling approximately 1.60 carats, and 30 round-cut diamonds that weigh approximately 1.20 carats. The Renaissance Revival design influence is carried onto the ring shank, culminating in a diamond set into the ring shank bottom. This striking ring demonstrates the color sensitivity of the famed American firm, Marcus & Co. It is also a rare and interesting Art Nouveau example of a Toi et Moi ring, or a ring in which two stones or two types of stones dynamically cross over each other symbolically representing a romantic union. The Toi et Moi rings were popularized by no less than Napoleon Bonaparte when he scandalously proposed to his soon to be Empress, Josephine. The multi-generational New York firm of Marcus & Co was founded by an ambitious young German immigrant who had trained at a prominent Dresden court jeweler. In 1892, after working with Charles Lewis Tiffany, Hermann Marcus and his sons William and George together set up a business that soon became a glittering New York society institution renowned not only for its superb diamonds, colored stones and pearls, but also its instantly recognizable, original design style. The firm produced great jewels in the Art Nouveau and Arts & Crafts s ... ensibility, with George, the artist/designer, drawing inspiration from sources as diverse and exotic as the contemporary French masters, the Moghuls and Maharajahs, the garland style of the Ancien Regime, and the genius of Renaissance goldsmiths. George''s distinctive, confident hand was always discernible in Marcus creations. Working as a team with George, his brother William was a gem and pearl connoisseur who travelled the world hunting fine gem material, including purchasing the entire production of never-before-seen black opal in Lightning Ridge Australia in 1908. Marcus exhibited at the 1900 Exposition Universelle in Paris, and their work won prizes at the prestigious Society of Arts & Crafts of Boston. The firm and family were well-known for their charitable activities and promotion of young jewelers such as Raymond Yard.

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Marcus & Company Art Nouveau Peridot,  Diamond, Gold and Enamel Ring

Louis Majorelle French Art Nouveau "Orchid" Table

A French Art Nouveau two-tiered ""Caltha des Marais" table with ormolu mounts by Louis Majorelle. The table was created at the height of Majorelle''s most fertile period. While pastiches marked Majorelle''s early career, Majorelle''s mature style reduced the excessive ornament of the ancien regime into the fluid line of modernity. This reduction is most apparent in the table''s skirt, where the baroque swag motif transforms into a graduating concave form. The table''s ormolu mounts are bereft of foliate scrolls and grotesque motifs. Instead, Majorelle''s sophisticated naturalism takes inspiration from the flowers of his native Nancy. Marsh marigolds form the top of each mount. Among the few flowers to grow in the caliginous marshes, their yellow petals are a welcome respite to the eye. So loved was the marsh marigold that Shakespeare proclaimed they grew at heaven''s gate, "Hark, hark! The lark at heaven''s gate sings...His steeds to water at those springs, On chaliced flowers that lies; And winking Mary-buds begin, To ope their golden eyes." The marsh marigolds terminate in "saggitaire fleche d''eau" or arrowhead leaves. Both flowers were endemic to lakes in the Vosges region. The tabletop is set with Amboyna burl veneer. Amboyna veneer is among the world''s rarest and most expensive veneers — holding the distinction of being the original wood used on Rolls Royce dashboards. ... Against the sobriety of the walnut skirt, the Amboyna burl gives the table an air of luxury. A similar table is pictured in: "The Paris Salons 1895-1915, Vol. III: Furniture," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1996, p. 396 (Chairs and tables Salon, 1904); and in: "Louis Majorelle: Master of Art Nouveau Design," by Alastair Duncan, New York: Harry N. Abrams, Inc., 1991, plate 57.

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Louis Majorelle French Art Nouveau 'Orchid' Table

French Art Nouveau Round Ceramic Decorative Charger by Clément Massier

A French Art Nouveau iridescent enamel-glazed ceramic charger by Clément Massier, after a design by Alphonse Mucha, depicting a woman''s profile in Byzantine dress and jewels. The particularity of this ceramic plate is that it combines Massier''s talent as a ceramist and Mucha''s talent as a draftsman. Indeed, the blond Byzantine head depicted on the charger was originally designed by Mucha in 1897, as part of his artistic diptych "Byzantine Heads."

French Art Nouveau Round Ceramic Decorative Charger  by Clément Massier

French Art Nouveau Ceramic Covered Jar by Rupert Carabin

A French Art Nouveau ceramic covered jar by Rupert Carabin, depicting a female nude wrapped around a gourd form, with a deep green glaze. All of Carabin''s ceramic work was done by his own hand. This piece was made by Moulines, 20, rue Laffite. Pictured in: "L''oeuvre de Rupert Carabin 1862.1932," by Colette Merklen, page 228 and in "Dynamic Beauty: Sculpture of Art Nouveau Paris," by Macklowe Gallery, The Studley Press, 2011, p. 81.

French Art Nouveau Ceramic Covered Jar by Rupert Carabin

Art Deco Onyx, Diamond and Platinum Cuff Links

A pair of Art Deco platinum, onyx and diamond double sided cuff links, featuring an octagonal shape inset with a circle of black onyx surrounded by rose-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of 1.20 carats.

Art Deco Onyx, Diamond and Platinum Cuff Links

French Art Deco Coral, Onyx and Diamond Cuff Links

A pair of French Art Deco platinum and 18 karat gold cuff links with diamond, onyx and coral. The cuff links have 56 rose-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of .40 carat, and polished coral and onyx stones. Double-sided.

French Art Deco Coral, Onyx and Diamond Cuff Links

Okrant et Davidonniez Paris Art Deco Diamond and Platinum Wide Bracelet

A French Art Deco platinum bracelet with diamonds by Okrant et Davidonniez. The flexible open work bracelet has 512 European-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of 38.00 carats, 2 larger diamonds with an approximate total weight of 2.00 carats, and 2 smaller flanking diamonds with an approximate total weight of 1.00 carat, VS clarity, G/H/I color grade. With original box. The Okrant et Davidonniez workshop was located in Paris at 64 rue Lafayette. They produced jewelry for all the Place Vendôme fine jewelry houses, such as Van Cleef & Arpels, Cartier, Mauboussin, and Boucheron. The firm closed in 1939. Exhibited at "Anything Goes: The Jazz Age" at the Nassau County Museum of Art, 24 March 2018 - 8 July 2018. Similar bracelets are pictured in Art Deco Jewelry, by Sylvie Raulet, Rizzoli, 1984, page 84, 154.

Okrant et Davidonniez Paris Art Deco Diamond and Platinum Wide Bracelet

French Art Deco Coral, Diamond, Onyx and Platinum Earrings

A pair of French Art Deco platinum earrings with diamonds, red coral, and onyx. The earring tops have black onyx and coral beads that suspend pear shape drop with 46 old European-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of 1.00 carat alternating with black enamel triangles. The interior of the drop is framed with a single piece of cut coral. The earrings are in a modified pendeloque motif. Similar discussed in Earrings from Antiquity to the Present by Daniela Mascetti and Amanda Triossi, Thames & Hudson, 1990, page 132-135.

French Art Deco Coral, Diamond, Onyx and Platinum Earrings

Kohn Art Deco Diamond, Ruby, Emerald and Lapis Lazuli Jardiniere Brooch

An Art Deco platinum and gold brooch with diamonds, ruby, emerald and lapis lazuli by Kohn. The brooch has 38 round-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of 1.20 carats, with ruby and emerald accents. The base of the jardiniere is formed of a single piece of lapis lazuli banded with red and black enamel. Exhibited at "Anything Goes: The Jazz Age" at the Nassau County Museum of Art, 24 March 2018 - 8 July 2018.

Kohn Art Deco Diamond, Ruby, Emerald and Lapis Lazuli Jardiniere Brooch

Late Edwardian Diamond, Onyx and Platinum Brooch

A late Edwardian platinum brooch with diamonds and onyx. The brooch has milgrain-set old European-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of 6.50 carats, H/I color grade, VS clarity, with baguette-cut onyx accents. The brooch is designed as a poppy blossom with articulated diamond-set knife-edge bars. With detachable brooch fitting.

Late Edwardian Diamond, Onyx and Platinum Brooch

French Art Deco Diamond and Platinum Wide Plaque Bracelet

A French Art Deco platinum and diamond bracelet . The wide, flexible, openwork bracelet is composed of 3 diamond plaques centering on 3 Old European-cut diamonds that weigh approximately .95 carat, .85 carat and .80 carat. There are 411 old European-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of 12.50 carats that form a geometric pattern. The larger diamonds are framed with 24 baguette-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of 2.00 carats. The total approximate weight of the bracelet is 28.00 carats, G/H/I color, VS/SI clarity. Similar bracelets are pictured in Art Deco Jewelry, by Sylvie Raulet, Rizzoli, 1984, pages 84,154.

French Art Deco Diamond and Platinum Wide Plaque Bracelet

Van Cleef & Arpels Paris Art Deco Ruby and Gold Ring

A French Art Deco 18 karat gold ring with rubies by Van Cleef & Arpels. The ring has 11 square-cut rubies with an approximate total weight of 1.32 carats. The ring is designed in a triple stepped, polished gold motif. Similar pictured in Art Deco Jewelry, by Sylvie Raulet, Rizzoli, 1985, page 157.

Van Cleef & Arpels Paris Art Deco Ruby and Gold  Ring

Late Art Deco Diamond, Sapphire and Platinum Double Ying-Yang Ring

An American Art Deco platinum ring with diamonds and sapphires. The ring has a center old European-cut diamond with an approximate weight of .50 carat flanked by 4 calibre cut sapphires, and a round-cut sapphire with an approximate weight of .57 carat flanked by 4 single cut diamonds. The ring is made as a double gypsy ring with the diamonds and sapphires in a ''ying-yang'' motif of positive-negative color.

Late Art Deco Diamond, Sapphire and Platinum Double Ying-Yang Ring

Art Deco Red Spinel, Diamond and Platinum Ring

A French Art Deco ring with red spinel and diamonds. The ring has a rectangular-cut red spinel with an approximate weight of 3.29 carats, 8 old European-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of .64 carat, and 8 baguette diamonds with an approximate total weight of .48 carat. The ring is designed in a plaque motif with baguette steps extending from the shoulders to the center-set spinel.

Art Deco Red Spinel, Diamond and Platinum Ring

Van Cleef & Arpels Paris Art Deco Diamond, Emerald and Platinum Bracelet

A French Art Deco platinum bracelet with emeralds and diamonds by Van Cleef & Arpels. The line bracelet has 14 emerald-cut emeralds with an approximate total weight of 2.10 carats, and 42 round-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of 2.95 carats in a 3 diamond, 1 emerald pattern. The bracelet has a deeply engraved foliate motif gallery. With fitted box.

Van Cleef & Arpels Paris Art Deco Diamond, Emerald and Platinum Bracelet

French Art Deco Gold and Platinum Cuff Links

A pair of French Art Deco 18 karat gold and platinum cuff links. The cuff links are designed in a square shape which is bisected by a platinum bar. Double sided. Discussed in "Cuff Links", by Susan Jonas and Marilyn Nissenson, Harry N. Abrams, 1991, pages 53-65.

French Art Deco Gold and Platinum Cuff Links

Mauboussin Late Art Deco Diamond, Sapphire and Gold Butterfly Brooch

A French Art Deco 18 karat gold brooch with sapphires and diamonds by Mauboussin. The brooch has 34 round sapphires with an approximate total weight of 2.00 carats, and 54 old European-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of 1.35 carats. The butterfly brooch is composed in a high three dimensional motif with open-work gold wings.

Mauboussin Late Art Deco Diamond, Sapphire and Gold Butterfly Brooch

Dreicer & Co Art Deco Diamond and Pearl Watch

An American Art Deco platinum and white gold watch with diamonds and seed pearls by Dreicer & Co. The rectangular-faced watch has 68 single-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of .76 carats surrounding the platinum case and accenting the bracelet strap of seed pearls measuring approximately 2 to 3 mm. Exhibited in "Roaring into the Future: New York 1915-35," at The Munson Williams Proctor Arts Institute, Utica, NY, June 17-October 9, 2017.

Dreicer & Co Art Deco Diamond and Pearl Watch

E. M. Gattle & Co. Art Deco Diamond and Platinum Brooch

An American Art Deco platinum brooch with diamonds by E. M. Gattle & Co.. The brooch has 168 old European-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of 4.50 carats, and 5 square-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of .75 carat. The total approximate diamond weight of the brooch is 5.25 carats, H/I color, VS clarity. The brooch centers on a dimensional jardinière flanked by pierced foliate elements with a milgrain set diamond border. E.M. Gattle Co. was founded by Emanuel Gattle in the latter part of the 19th century. Originally, E.M. Gattle & Co. was located on Broadway in the theatre district. In 1907, the company moved to the corner of 38th Street and Fifth Avenue and, later, to 55th Street and Fifth Avenue, next to the St. Regis Hotel. One of their notable customers was Enrico Caruso, who shopped Gattle stores for jewelry. However, he was not only a shopper of Gattle, he also allowed his name and photograph to be used in Gattle advertising. Gattle became successful until the time they closed their doors. The firm closed in 1940, a year before the outbreak of World War II. Exhibited at "Anything Goes: The Jazz Age" at the Nassau County Museum of Art, 24 March 2018 - 8 July 2018.

E. M. Gattle & Co. Art Deco Diamond and Platinum Brooch

Art Deco Diamond and Platinum Necklace

An Art Deco platinum necklace with diamonds. The necklace has 250 old European-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of 9.00 carats, 27 mixed-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of 5.50 carats, and 7 marquise-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of 3.00 carats. The approximate total weight of the necklace is 17.50 carats, H/I color, VS/SI clarity. The necklace is designed in a strong Art Deco geometric motif with the central plaque suspending a graduated series of marquise diamond articulated tassels, and the clasp repeating the central plaque motif. Similar pictured in Art Deco Jewelry, by Sylvie Raulet, Rizzoli, 1984, page 124.

Art Deco Diamond and Platinum Necklace

Ostertag Paris Art Deco Diamond and Platinum Double Clip Brooch

A French Art Deco platinum double clip brooch with diamonds by Ostertag. The double clip brooch has 182 round and baguette-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of 9.50 carats, G/H/I color, VS/SI clarity. Original bill of sale from M.S.Arnold Ostertag. The clips are designed in a stylized wing motif. Signed box, ''Paris Arnold Ostertag''. The firm of Ostertag, founded in the 1920''s by Swiss-born, Arnold Ostertag (1883 – c.1940) is said to have created objects that rivaled the creations of the more celebrated houses of Cartier, Van Cleef & Arpels, and Boucheron. The Ostertag Maison was located in Paris, at number 16 Place Vendôme, near other important jewelry houses of the day. During the 1920s and 1930s, Ostertag was especially known for jewelry and objets d''art based on Asian and Indian designs. One style, known as Tutti Frutti, popular from the early 1920s to the late 1930s, combined influences from Islamic religious architecture and so-called Hindu or Indian styles. Emeralds, carved rubies, and sapphires – often imported from worldwide locations – were interspersed with diamonds. The jewels were crafted into unique pieces using the highest known techniques of the day and arranged into flowers and leaves, studded with berries and fruit. Many of the creations were purchased by an elite clientele that ranged from empresses, kings, and dukes to celebrities. Ostert ... ag was among the renowned Parisian jewelers, led by Cartier and Mauboussin, that were invited to commission masterpieces in collaboration with other respected and well-known jewelry and timepiece houses of the day. Ostertag''s objets d''art and decorative clocks made by the revered clockmaker, George Verger, are jeweled works of art. In 1929 Ostertag exhibited jewelry and objets d''art at the Musée Galliera. Ostertag''s Paris shop continued until late 1939, when he left for America, where he died around 1940. His biographers, Proddow and Healy, write that Ostertag regularly visited America in years between World Wars I and II. They write that he would come to New York in mid-October, spend two months in Los Angeles, then visit Florida, and return to Paris via Cannes at Easter. After two months in Paris, he spent July in Deauville, August in the south of France, and September in Biarritz. At the onset of World War II, Maison Ostertag closed its doors forever. Discussed in Art Deco Jewelry by Sylvie Raulet, Rizzoli, 1985.

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Ostertag Paris Art Deco Diamond and Platinum Double Clip Brooch

Jung & Klitz Art Deco Jadeite Jade, Diamond and Platinum Ring

An American Art Deco platinum ring with jadeite and diamonds by Jung & Klitz. The ring has a cabochon jadeite measuring 15.90 x 11.35 x 4.28 mm, and old European-cut and bullet cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of 1.00 carat. Mason-Kay natural color report. Made by Jung & Klitz, a New York Company active 1915-1922. "Diamond Jim" Brady was one of their clients.

Jung & Klitz Art Deco Jadeite Jade, Diamond and Platinum Ring

Art Deco Ruby and Platinum Cuff Links

A pair of Art Deco platinum cuff links with rubies. The cuff links have 12 calibre-cut rubies with an approximate total weight of 1.20 carats. The cuff links are designed in a strong architectural motif. Double sided.

Art Deco Ruby and Platinum Cuff Links

Tiffany & Co. Art Deco Sapphire and Platinum Dress Set

A Tiffany & Co. platinum Art Deco 5-piece cuff link set with sapphires weighing approximately 2.05 carats. The dress set is designed with diagonal stripes of square-cut sapphires bisecting the square cuff link tops. The cuff links are double-sided with bar connections.

Tiffany & Co. Art Deco Sapphire and Platinum Dress Set

Tiffany Favrile Paperweight "Daffodil" Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York Favrile paperweight glass "Daffodil" vase, featuring yellow flowers with dark centers extending above green leaves. The paperweight technique involved fusing thin rods of transparent glass in a variety of colors. The resulting thicker rod was but into thin pieces and were then worked into clear glass. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: "Louis Comfort Tiffany at Tiffany & Co.," by John Loring, New York: Harry N. Abrams, Inc., 2002, page 158.

Tiffany Favrile Paperweight 'Daffodil' Vase

French Art Nouveau Bronze Vase by Korschann

A French Art Nouveau vase by Charles Korschann in gilt-bronze. The vase has a diamond-shaped base that tapers to a narrow rounded top, where it intersects with swirling stems and flower buds that form the handle, and features sculpted decoration in relief. On the front, we see a nude female figure emerging from a field of poppies with flowers in her long, flowing hair. The composition is all about movement and abundance, with the entire space carpeted in flowers and the maiden''s hair spilling out over the frame. The reverse, on the other hand, is more sedate and controlled, depicting a stylized arrangement of flower buds, stems and leaves in a structured, ordered composition, executed in a lower relief with thin incised lines echoing the shape of the three flower buds like ripples in the water. The vase combines many common motifs from Symbolist and Art Nouveau design: bats (shown in relief on the top), poppies and seductive women, or femmes fatales. Together, they evoke a mysterious dream-state, suggested in the identification of poppies with opiates and bats with the night.

French Art Nouveau Bronze Vase by Korschann

Tiffany Studios New York "Tel el Amarna" Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York glass vase. A wide-shouldered, unique translucent gold body with a band of green colored Egyptian "Tel-El-Amarna" design around the neck. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: "Tiffany at Auction," by Alastair Duncan, New York: Rizzoli, 1981, p. 17, cat. no. 18.

Tiffany Studios New York 'Tel el Amarna' Vase

Petite Coupe Sur in Enamel and Gold by Thesmar

Petite coupe sur talon in enamel and 18 karat gold by André Fernand Thesmar (1843–1912). In original box. André Fernand Thesmar (1843-1912) was a French enameler. He is credited with bringing the soft-paste porcelain back into style, alongside sections with gold foil backings, in the 20th century. He also used the method of plique-à-jour, including works that were often inspired by Japanese and Chinese enameling. He showed his work at the 1900 Paris Exposition Universelle. The floral motifs that adorn this petite coupe sur talon by André Thesmar appear to float due to the expert use of plique-à-jour, a type of enamel that has no backing so that light can shine through it like leaded glass. Thesmar''s ability to create such an exceptional piece in gold and enamel shows a combination of artistry and technical genius that is very rare to come by. A similar coupe sur talon is in the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.

Petite Coupe Sur in Enamel and Gold by Thesmar

French Art Nouveau Lithograph "Salons des Cent XXeme Exposition" by Mucha

A French Art Nouveau "Salons des Cent XXeme Exposition" lithograph by Alphonse Mucha. Salon des Cent was the exhibition hall associated with La Plume magazine. This poster was Mucha''s introductory gift to La Plume in appreciation for being invited to join the magazine''s roster of artists. La Plume eventually sold all of Mucha''s posters through their art department and honored him with a one-man show the following year. The languorous woman with long, entwined, curling tresses represents feminine inspiration and ultimately became a symbol for the Art Nouveau movement. The quill and paintbrush she holds in her hand are a direct reference to La Plume - both the exhibition hall and the magazine. A similar lithograph is described and pictured in: "Alphonse Mucha: The Complete Posters and Panels", by Jack Rennert and Alain Weill, Boston: G.K. Hall & Co., 1984, pp. 72-75.

French Art Nouveau Lithograph 'Salons des Cent XXeme Exposition' by Mucha

Tiffany Studios New York Favrile Glass Flower Form Vase

A Favrile flower form vase by Louis Comfort Tiffany featuring a pulled feather design in tones and hues of pink, yellow and white. Favrile glass vases in the shapes of stylized flowers were among the earliest creations of the Tiffany Glass and Decorating Company, forerunner of Tiffany Studios. Initial examples of this technique date from approximately 1894, although later pieces show greater refinement. Flower forms have great variety in stem length and rim shape. A similar vase is pictured in: "The Tiffany Collection of the Chrysler Museum at Norfolk," by Paul E. Doros, Richmond, VA: W. M. Brown & son, Inc., 1978, p. 34, cat. no. 31.

Tiffany Studios New York Favrile Glass Flower Form Vase

Tiffany Studios New York Favrile Vase

A Favrile glass vase by Tiffany Studios New York. The vase has a background of iridescent medium and turquoise blue swirls that is overlaid with thick opaque pink geometric decoration.

Tiffany Studios New York Favrile Vase

French Armchairs by Louis Majorelle

A pair of French Art Nouveau "Pommes de Pins" walnut armchairs by Louis Majorelle. The chair backs and seats are upholstered in green fabric. They have carved arms, legs and spindle sides. This model of arm chair was used in the bed chamber of Madam Majorelle. Pictured in: "Majorelle: Une Aventure Moderne," by Roselyne Bouvier, Paris: La Bibliothèque des Arts, 1991, page 118, plate 120.

French Armchairs by Louis Majorelle

Austrian Vase by Karl Koepping

An Austrian slender and tall vase in deep purple glass by Karl Koepping. The vase''s color is reminiscent of the purple traditionally made from the spiny dye-myrex snail at great expense and associated with royalty. A similar vase is pictured in the "Art Decoratif 1899 2" page 211.

Austrian Vase by Karl Koepping

Decorated Glass Vase by Louis Comfort Tiffany

A decorated glass vase by Louis Comfort Tiffany. This vase has a vivid iridescent blue pulled feather design on an iridescent charcoal background. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: "The Art Glass of Louis Comfort Tiffany," by Paul E. Doros, New York: The Vendome Press, 2013, p. 212, fig. 169.

Decorated Glass Vase by Louis Comfort Tiffany

French Pâte-de-Verre Dish by Amalric Walter

A French ''Lucanes, cerf-volant'' pâte de verre by Amalric Walter and Henri Bergé. This piece features two scarabs atop a raised mound at the center of the dish. The glass of the surrounding dish graduates from opaque fiery ochre to translucent gold. A similar dish is pictured in : Amalric Walter (1870-1959), by Keith Cummings, Kingswinford: Broadfield House Glass Museum, 2006, p. 24, plate 26.

French Pâte-de-Verre Dish by Amalric Walter

Intaglio Vase by Tiffany Studios New York

A Tiffany Studios New York intaglio carved cameo glass vase, featuring white flowers with blue and purple accents, dark blue scarabs adorning the white petals and green vines with leaves against an iridescent blue/green ground.

Intaglio Vase by Tiffany Studios New York

Art Nouveau Enameled and Etched Glass Vase by Daum

A French Art Nouveau enameled and etched glass vase by Daum. The curved stems of the organic scene are mimicked by the amphoric body of the vase. This bright vase is dominated by two planes of mottled glass, golden yellow on top of deep purple, which together create a landscape scene. The vase is decorated with etched and enameled flowers. The flora seem to grow from the base of the vase because of the landscape effect achieved in the ground behind the scene. At the base, the leaves and stems of the flowers appear as shadows, as they are only etched into the dark ground. Once the flora break through into the golden section of the vase, the etched scene is enhanced by bright, verdant green enamel, which gives way to vibrant red orchids. The scene is completed by a curious bee floating up to the blossom. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: Daum: Maitres Verriers, 1890-1980, by Noël Daum, Lausanne: Edita Denoël, 1980, p. 122.

Art Nouveau Enameled and Etched Glass Vase by Daum

Art Nouveau Enameled and Etched Glass Vase by Daum

A French Art Nouveau enameled and etched glass vase by Daum. This vase is an elliptic cylinder, a shape which Daum used because it lends itself to undulating and soft nature scenes. This bright vase is dominated by two planes of mottled glass, golden yellow on top of deep purple, which together create a landscape scene. The vase is decorated with etched and enameled flowers. The flora seem to grow from the base of the vase because of the landscape effect achieved in the ground behind the scene. At the base, the leaves and stems of the flowers appear as shadows, as they are only etched into the dark ground. Once the flora break through into the golden section of the vase, the etched scene is enhanced by bright, verdant green enamel, which gives way to vibrant red orchids. The scene is completed by a curious bee floating up to the blossom, ready to pollinate it. The presence of the bee implies that this springtime scene is not entirely completed in the vase, but that it is rather just a part of a fleeting moment rendered in glass. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: Daum: Maitres Verriers, 1890-1980, by Noël Daum, Lausanne: Edita Denoël, 1980, p. 122.

Art Nouveau Enameled and Etched Glass Vase by Daum

Marcus & Co. Early-20th Century Diamond, Natural Pearl, Platinum and Gold Ring

An American Early 20th Century platinum and 18 karat gold ring with diamonds and natural pearl by Marcus & Co. The ring has 3 old mine-cut diamonds with an approximate weight of 1.25, 1.35 and 1.05 carats, L/M color, SI clarity respectively, and 10 old European-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of .10 carat. The center of this ring is a natural pearl measuring 7.91 x 7.86 mm. Gemological Institute of America Certificate stating natural saltwater pearl #2155277139. The multi-generational New York firm of Marcus & Co was founded by an ambitious young German immigrant who had trained at a prominent Dresden court jeweler. In 1892, after working with Charles Lewis Tiffany, Hermann Marcus and his sons William and George together set up a business that soon became a glittering New York society institution renowned not only for its superb diamonds, colored stones and pearls, but also its instantly recognizable, original design style. The firm produced great jewels in the Art Nouveau and Arts & Crafts sensibility, with George, the artist/designer, drawing inspiration from sources as diverse and exotic as the contemporary French masters, the Moghuls and Maharajahs, the garland style of the Ancien Regime, and the genius of Renaissance goldsmiths. George''s distinctive, confident hand was always discernible in Marcus creations. Working as a team with George, his brother Wil ... liam was a gem and pearl connoisseur who travelled the world hunting fine gem material, including purchasing the entire production of never-before-seen black opal in Lightning Ridge Australia in 1908. Marcus exhibited at the 1900 Exposition Universelle in Paris, and their work won prizes at the prestigious Society of Arts & Crafts of Boston. Plique-a-jour enamel was an art in which Marcus & Co. excelled, creating jewels with unprecedented three-dimensional depth in this medium. The firm and family were well-known for their charitable activities and promotion of young jewelers such as Raymond Yard.

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Marcus & Co. Early-20th Century Diamond, Natural Pearl, Platinum and Gold Ring

Art Deco Burma Ruby, Diamond and Platinum Ring

An early Art Deco platinum ring with ruby and diamonds. The ring has a cushion-cut ruby with an approximate weight of 2.32 carats, and 47 old mine-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of .70 carat. The center stone carries Gubelin Certificate No.14050082, 22 May 2014 which states that the ruby has characteristics consistent with those of Burma origin and that there is no indication of heating. The center ruby is surrounded by two concentric circles of the old mine-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of .70 carat. .

Art Deco Burma Ruby, Diamond and Platinum Ring

Marsh & Co. Mid-20th Century Jadeite Jade, Diamond, Steel and Platinum Ring

An American Mid-20th Century oxidized steel, platinum, jadeite and diamond ring, by G. T. Marsh & Co. The ring set with a marquise-shape jadeite cabochon, flanked by lines of 8 round diamonds with an approximate total weight of .16 carat. G.T. Marsh & Co. was a San Francisco-based Asian art dealer known for their distinctive jewels. As a boy infatuated with Asian culture, George Turner Marsh apprenticed with a Japanese tea merchant, remaining there alone while his Australian family continued on to San Francisco, where they settled. Young George used his time in Yokohama to become conversant in Japanese art and aesthetics, and after re-joining his family, established an Asian art gallery using the expertise he had acquired. During the 1930s, 40s and 50s, his family began designing jewelry based on their interpretation of masterful Japanese metalwork together with the favored gems of the region, jadeite, coral and pearls. The firm''s unique steel jewelry was produced by bluing and sandblasting techniques, which gave the metal its matte finish, an extraordinary base for its sparkling, gleaming gems.

Marsh & Co. Mid-20th Century Jadeite Jade, Diamond, Steel and Platinum Ring

Marianne Ostier Mid-20th Century Diamond and Gold Earrings

A pair of 18 karat gold earrings with diamonds by Marianne Ostier. The earrings contain 32 round-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of 2.60 carats, G/H color, VS clarity. The earrings are composed of twisted gold wire forming a cone shape which is topped with a cluster of diamonds. "A Collection of Jewelry, Designed by Marianne Ostier Ostier, Inc., one of New York''s leading jewelers dealing precious-stone jewelry of original design and superb custom craftsmanship, was closed in September of this year [1969], following the death of its co-founder, Oliver Ostier. The present sale offers the entire stock of this distinguished firm. All pieces are original designs of Marianne Ostier, co-founder with her late husband of the firm and an internationally famed designer of jewelry. "Of the decision to close the business, Marianne Ostier said: With the passing of my husband, I have had to devote more and more of my efforts to administrative duties. These demands of my time can no longer be met without artistic compromise which to me is unacceptable. "Representing the third generation of court jewelers in Austria, Oliver Ostier came to America following the Anschluss of 1938. Shortly thereafter he founded the firm of Ostier, Inc., with his wife Marianne, a talented painter and sculptress as well as an artist in the design of jewelry. Author of Jewels and the woman , the ... basic primer of the art of wearing jewelry, Marianne Ostier''s designs became major jewelry fashions and classics of modern designed jewelry. She is responsible for numerous innovations, such as the pincushion clip, the famed skin pin and free-form jewelry; she pioneered in abstract designs for jewelry and, as a sculptress, brought a new dimension to her work in jewelry design. For many years, Mrs. Ostier won the Diamond U.S.A. Award and the Diamond International Award for design excellence. The first life-time member elected to the Diamonds-International Academy, the hall of fame for modern jewelry designers, she represented the United States at the Art in Precious Jewelry exhibition at the Finch College Museum of Art in 1966, which featured the work of the foremost designers of ten countries. Among the artists, in addition to Mrs. Ostier, were Georges Braques and Salvador Dali."

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Marianne Ostier Mid-20th Century Diamond and Gold Earrings

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

A French Art Nouveau cameo glass vase by Daum, decorated with deeply wheel-carved green flowers on rose and pink ground, with applied foot. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: "Daum Nancy III" by Katharina Büttiker, Zurich: Galerie Katharina Büttiker, 2009, p. 88 ("Fern" Vase).

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

A French Art Nouveau cameo glass boat-form vase by Daum, featuring an applied wheel-carved pink flower and etched green leaves. A similar vase is pictured in: "Daum" by Clotilde Bacri, Noël Daum and Claude Pétry, Paris: Michel Aveline Éditeur, 1992, p. 91.

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

A French Art Nouveau wheel-carved cameo glass vase by Daum, featuring a decoration of blue flowers and light blue and grey stems and leaves on an opaque, mottled white and yellow ground. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: "Daum Frères: Maîtres Verriers, 1892-1935," by Katharina Büttiker-Weber, Zurich: Galerie Katharina Büttiker, 1986, cat. no. 114.

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

A French Art Nouveau wheel-carved and acid-etched cameo glass vase by Daum, featuring a carved mottled pink flower against an opaque textured ground. An identical vase is pictured in: "Daum: Collection du muse des Beaux-Arts de Nancy," Paris: Réunion des musées nationaux, 2000, cat. no. 219.

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

A French Art Nouveau cameo glass vase by Daum, featuring deep blue flowers on a mottled white and blue ground. The vase has both wheel-carving and martelé techniques. A similar vase is pictured in: "Daum Nancy III: Daum Frères – Verreries de Nancy, 1880-1930," by Katharina Büttiker, Zurich: Galerie Katharina Büttiker, 2009, p. 149.

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

A French Art Nouveau wheel-carved cameo glass pitcher by Daum, featuring an applied white flower and blades of grass against a mottled blue and white ground. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: "Daum Nancy: Maîtres Verriers" by Katharina Büttiker, Zurich: Galerie Katharina Büttiker, 2001, p. 125, cat. no. 76.

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass "Blooming Flower" Vase by Daum

A French Art Nouveau wheel-carved cameo glass vase by Daum, featuring a blooming flower in a deep blue, on an opaque white and mottled blue ground. A vase decorated in a similar style is pictured in: "Daum: Collection du muse des Beaux-Arts de Nancy," Paris: Réunion des musées nationaux, 2000, cat. no. 206.

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass 'Blooming Flower' Vase by Daum

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

A French Art Nouveau wheel-carved cameo glass vase by Daum, featuring blue flowers and dark green stems and leaves against a mottled white and blue ground. A vase decorated in a similar style is pictured in: "Daum: Collection du muse des Beaux-Arts de Nancy," Paris: Réunion des musées nationaux, 2000, cat. no. 224.

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

A French Art Nouveau satin-finished cameo glass vase, "Fleur de Coloquinte", by Daum, featuring the depiction of zucchini leaves and flowers in pale green, against a mottled opaque white and orange ground. The vase features the soufflé, or "blown-out" technique, making the leaves and flowers stand out from the shape of vase. Pictured in: "Daum - Maitres Verriers" by Edita Denoel, Edita S.A. Lausanne, 1980, p. 61.

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

French Art Nouveau "Snow Drop" Vase by Daum

A French Art Nouveau cameo glass "Snow Drop" vase by Daum, featuring carved light blue flowers on brown stems against a mottled white and blue ground. A similar vase is pictured in: "Daum Nancy: Maîtres Verriers" by Katharina Büttiker, Zurich: Galerie Katharina Büttiker, 2001, p. 68, cat. no. 43.

French Art Nouveau 'Snow Drop' Vase by Daum

French Art Nouveau Glass and Wood Footed Bowl by Emile Gallé

A French Art Nouveau glass and wood footed bowl by Emile Gallé, featuring a multicolored pinched-sided glass bowl in yellow, purple, and green. The bowl sits atop a carved walnut foot with openwork floral design and scrolled base. Pictured in "Meubles et Ensembles Style 1900" by Edith Mannoni, page 54. Provenance: Private collection of Mr. Robert S. Walker.

French Art Nouveau Glass and Wood Footed Bowl by Emile Gallé

French Art Nouveau Wheel Carved Cameo Glass Bottle

A French Art Nouveau wheel-carved cameo glass bottle with stopper. The bottle is decorated with an iris flower on an opalescent background. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: "Liberty: Natura e materia" by Donata Patrussi and Giovanni Renzi, Milan: Giunti, 2011, p. 85.

French Art Nouveau Wheel Carved Cameo Glass Bottle

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

A French Art Nouveau wheel-carved cameo glass vase by Daum, featuring a decoration of blue flowers and light blue/grey stems and leaves on an opaque, mottled white and yellow ground. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: "French Cameo Glass" by Berniece and Henry Blount, Des Moines: Dr.& Mrs. Henry Blount, Jr., 1968, p. 74, cat. no. 102.

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

A French Art Nouveau cameo glass vase by Daum, comprised of three pinkish-red poppy flowers wheel carved to show different stages of bloom, against a sky blue martelé technique background, with brown foliage and peach tones towards the bottom to represent the rising sun. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: "Daum: Maitres Verriers, 1890-1980," by Noël Daum, Lausanne: Edita Denoël, 1980, p. 115 (bottom left); and in: "Daum Nancy III: Daum Frères – Verreries de Nancy, 1880-1930," by Katharina Büttiker, Zurich: Galerie Katharina Büttiker, 2009, p. 118.

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

French Art Nouveau "Mimosa" Vase by Daum

An artistic French Art Nouveau mimosa vase by Daum featuring pink cameo overlay naturalistically modeled as a languid orchid. The influences of Japanese culture permeated fin de siècle Paris and could be felt in museums and in homes. Similarly, a nascent fascination with natural forms, found in publications of the day like Ernst Haeckle''s Kunstformen der Natur, manifested itself in a proliferation of flowers in French art and design and in an intense investigation of flora where artists rivaled botanists. This piece borders on abstraction. The orchid, splayed open and surrounded by copious pollen spores, is imbued with feminine sensuality. The imaginative color palate and curving lines surpass the glass design standards of the day and render this piece a beguiling objet d''art.

French Art Nouveau 'Mimosa' Vase by Daum

French Art Nouveau Vase "Squash Blossom" by Daum

A French Art Nouveau clear glass vase with green cameo overlay in a squash blossom motif by Daum. The vase has deep green leaves, buds, flowers and a squash suspended from sinuous vines. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: "Daum: Collection du muse des Beaux-Arts de Nancy," Paris: Réunion des musées nationaux, 2000, cat. no. 224.

French Art Nouveau Vase 'Squash Blossom' by Daum

"Rose de France" Vase by Emile Gallé

A French Art Nouveau "Rose de France" vase by Emile Gallé. In 1870, Nancy, the home of Gallé, was annexed by Germany as a result of the defeat of France in the Franco-Prussian war. Gallé chose to use the motif of the red rose, which only bloomed in the Mt. Saint-Quentin province of Lorraine, as a symbol of his strident patriotism. In 1902 a vase from this series was presented to the Russian emperor as a prestigious gift from France. The vase shows Gallé''s innovative technique of glass marquetry which involved the incorporation of glass fragments of various thickness, shapes and colors into the still malleable glass. The multi-layering of glass and the use of metallic foils behind the glass make this piece so exceptional. A similar vase is pictured in: "Gallé", catalogue for the exhibition at le Musée du Luxembourg, Paris, November 1985-February 1986, "Paris: Éditions de la Réunion des muse nationaux", 1985, p. 149.

'Rose de France' Vase by Emile Gallé

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

A French Art Nouveau wheel-carved cameo glass vase by Daum, featuring green leaves and orange berries against a dark orange and mottled light green ground. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: "Daum" by Clotilde Bacri, Noël Daum and Claude Pétry, Paris: Michel Aveline Éditeur, 1992, p. 95.

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

Hunt & Roskell London Antique Diamond, Pearl, Gold and Enamel Bracelet

An Antique English 18 karat gold, diamond, natural pearl and enamel hinged bracelet by Hunt & Roskell of London. The bracelet features 84 old mine- and rose-cut diamonds that have the approximate total weight of 2.70 carats. The natural pearl center plaque of the bracelet is removable and can be worn as a brooch. The center pearl measures 8.55 mm. with 4 additional pearls that measure 5.9 mm. With original brooch attachments and original signed fitted box. Selected as jewelers and goldsmiths to Her Majesty in the 1840s, Hunt & Roskell of New Bond Street were prominent participants in the Crystal Palace Exhibition of 1851, the first of the competitive international expositions that provided dynamic impetus to creativity and accomplishment in the fine and decorative arts. Their work ran from glamorous (diamond and gem-set tiaras convertible into necklaces) to exotic (bracelets set with rare Indian portrait diamonds), and they were owners for a time of the legendary Hope blue diamond. In keeping with the firm''s tradition of versatility, this chic bracelet, with its creamy natural pearls set off by sparkling antique-cut diamonds, conceals a brooch fitting under the velvet interior of its original morocco leather box.

Hunt & Roskell London Antique Diamond, Pearl, Gold and Enamel Bracelet

Edwardian Diamond and Platinum Bracelet

An Edwaradian platinum and diamond bracelet. The bracelet is set with old European-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of 9.35 carats. The bracelet is composed of 6 diamond-set plaques separated by diamond-set links.

Edwardian Diamond and Platinum  Bracelet

Art Deco Diamond, Sapphire and Platinum Art Deco Bracelet

An American Art Deco platinum bracelet with diamonds. The 4 section flexible bracelet is set with Old European-cut round and marquise-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of 12.30 carats. The bracelet has 24 calibe-cut sapphire accents with an approximate total weight of 1.75 carats.

Art Deco Diamond, Sapphire and Platinum Art Deco Bracelet

French Art Deco Diamond and Platinum Line Bracelet

A French Art Deco diamond and platinum bracelet. The line bracelet has 38 round Old European box-set diamonds with an approximate total weight of 12.75 carats, I/J color, VS/SI clarity. The bracelet centers on a .90 carat Old European cut diamond graduating to diamonds of approximately .10 carat.

French Art Deco Diamond and Platinum Line Bracelet

Art Deco Diamond, Sapphire and Platinum Link Bracelet

A French Art Deco 18-karat gold and platinum bracelet with blue sapphires and diamonds. The bracelet has 8 open link sections with 64 old European-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of 9.60 carats, and 32 single-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of .64 carat, H/I color, VS clarity. The sections are connected with 8 links of 25 French-cut blue sapphires with an approximate total weight of 6.25 carats.

Art Deco Diamond, Sapphire and Platinum Link Bracelet

French Art Nouveau Plique-a-Jour, Diamond, and Pearl Pendant/Brooch

A French Art Nouveau 18 karat gold, plique-a-jour enamel, diamond and pearl brooch. The brooch centers a relief portrait of a young woman with flowing hair among flowering vines on a plique-a-jour enamel ground with foliate old mine and rose-cut diamond accents weighing approximately 0.25 carat, suspending a freshwater pearls. With French assay mark.

French Art Nouveau Plique-a-Jour, Diamond, and Pearl Pendant/Brooch

Art Deco Platinum and Diamond Double Clip Brooch

An Art Deco platinum and diamond double clip brooch designed in a stylized ribbon motif centering on two kite-shaped diamonds with an approximate total weight of .90 carat, surrounded by 170 old European-cut diamonds and 66 baguette-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of 7.50 carats, H/I color, VS clarity. The brooch has a removable pin back which separates the clips.

Art Deco Platinum and Diamond Double Clip Brooch

French Art Nouveau Ceramic Urn by Majorelle & Mougin

A French Art Nouveau ceramic urn designed by Louis Majorelle and produced by Mougin, featuring swirls of blue on a beige and ash-colored ground, with a snail at at the base. Similar piece pictured in: "Les Frères Mougin, sorciers du grand feu: gres et porcelaine 1898-1950" by Jacques G. Peiffer, p. 157.

French Art Nouveau Ceramic Urn by Majorelle & Mougin

French Art Nouveau Ceramic Vide-Poche by Bussière

A French Art Nouveau ceramic vide-poche designed by Ernest Bussière and produced by Keller et Guérin, consisting of two interlocking conch shell dishes with delicate pink, cream and green glazes.

French Art Nouveau Ceramic Vide-Poche by Bussière

French Art Nouveau Ceramic Vase by de Feure

A French Art Nouveau porcelain vase by Georges de Feure, featuring a blue and pink floral decoration on a glazed cream-white ground. Made for La Maison Art Nouveau Bing. Similar vase in the collection of the Musée des Arts Décoratifs. Similar vases pictured in: "Art Nouveau Bing: Paris Style 1900" by Gabriel Weisberg, p. 204, pl. 198.

French Art Nouveau Ceramic Vase by de Feure

French Art Nouveau Ceramic "Gourd" Vase by Ernest Bussière

A French Art Nouveau ceramic "Gourd" vase designed by Ernest Bussière and produced by Keller et Guérin, featuring stylized high-relief berries on the gourd form, with green and purple enameled glazes. This vase was shown at the Exposition de l''Ecole de Nancy in Paris in 1903 (see "The Paris Salons 1895-1915, Vol. IV: Ceramics and Glass," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1998, p.261).

French Art Nouveau Ceramic 'Gourd' Vase by Ernest Bussière

French Art Nouveau Ceramic Vase by Bussière

A French Art Nouveau vase designed by Ernest Bussière and produced by Keller et Guérin, depicting two lizards in high relief wrapped around the rim. The vase features iridescent milky-green and mauve glazes with iridescent highlights. A similar vase was shown at the Exposition de l''Ecole de Nancy in Paris in 1903 (see "The Paris Salons 1895-1915, Vol. IV: Ceramics and Glass," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1998, p.260).

French Art Nouveau Ceramic Vase by Bussière

French Art Nouveau Ceramic Vase by Bussière

A French Art Nouveau vase by Keller and Guérin, from a design by Ernest Bussière, featuring the form of a closed flower in relief, with iridescent milky-green and mauve glazes. A similar vase was shown at the Exposition de l''Ecole de Nancy in Paris in 1903 (see "The Paris Salons 1895-1915, Vol. IV: Ceramics and Glass," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1998, p. 260).

 French Art Nouveau Ceramic Vase by Bussière

French Art Nouveau Ceramic Tray by Lachenal

A French Art Nouveau ceramic tray by Edmond Lachenal, featuring a decoration of three frogs hanging on to the sides of a lily pad, in light brown and green glazes. A similar tray is pictured in: "Edmond Lachenal and His Legacy," by Martin Eidelberg and Claire Cass, New York: Jason Jacques Gallery Press, 2007, p. 100, cat. no. 22.

French Art Nouveau Ceramic Tray by Lachenal

French Art Nouveau "Ombellifère" Ceramic Vase by Bussière

A French Art Nouveau iridescent glazed ceramic "Ombellifère" vase designed by Ernest Bussière and produced by Keller et Guérin, depicting ombelle blossoms in low relief, with six flowers whose stems extend away from the body of the vase to form delicate handles. A similar vase was shown at the Exposition de l''Ecole de Nancy in Paris in 1903 (see "The Paris Salons 1895-1915, Vol. IV: Ceramics and Glass," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1998, p.260).

French Art Nouveau 'Ombellifère' Ceramic Vase by Bussière

French Art Nouveau Ceramic Vase by Lachenal

A French Art Nouveau ceramic vase by Edmond Lachenal, featuring a stylistic depiction of leaves and vines with intricate piercing and carving in a graduated light green to green glaze. A similar vase is pictured in: "The Paris Salons 1895-1915, Vol. IV: Ceramics and Glass" by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1998, p. 266 (Grès vase, from La Société Nationale des Beaux-Arts, 1898); and in: "Edmond Lachenal and His Legacy," by Martin Eidelberg and Claire Cass, New York: Jason Jacques Gallery Press, 2007, p. 81, cat. no. 12.

French Art Nouveau Ceramic Vase by Lachenal

French Art Nouveau Ceramic Planter by Bigot

A French Art Nouveau earthenware planter by Alexander Bigot for the architect Cintrat, featuring an organic pattern that repeats itself around the base.

French Art Nouveau Ceramic Planter by Bigot

French Art Nouveau Ceramic Vase by Bussière

A French Art Nouveau ceramic vase designed by Ernest Bussière and produced by Keller et Guérin. The vase is decorated with vegetal forms and has a glaze of pale green with traces of purple. A similar vase was shown at the Exposition de l''Ecole de Nancy in Paris in 1903 (see "The Paris Salons 1895-1915, Vol. IV: Ceramics and Glass," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1998, p.260).

French Art Nouveau Ceramic Vase by Bussière

French Art Nouveau Covered Porcelain Jar by de Feure

A French Art Nouveau covered porcelain jar designed by Georges de Feure and manufactured by Dufraisseix & Abbot, Limoges for Art Nouveau Bing. In the manner of de Feure''s renowned textiles, this piece is decorated with elegantly painted abstract floral and vegetal designs. Pictured in "The Paris Salons 1895-1914: Volume IV Ceramics & Glass," by Alastair Duncan, Page 159.

French Art Nouveau Covered Porcelain Jar by de Feure

Art Nouveau Portrait Gold Cuff Links

A pair of American Art Nouveau 14 karat gold cuff links. The cuff links depict male and female heads surrounded by frames of swirling and whiplash hair in an Art Nouveau motif. The cuff links are double sided.

Art Nouveau Portrait Gold Cuff Links

Marsh Mid-20th Century Steel and Pearl Dress Set

A Mid-20th Century patinated steel and gold dress set with cultured pearls by G.T. Marsh. The full dress set is composed of double sided cuff links, three dress studs and two dress buttons. The set is in a square geometric step motif with a pearl at the center. In the original signed Marsh box. G.T. Marsh & Co. was a San Francisco-based Asian art dealer known for their distinctive jewels. As a boy infatuated with Asian culture, George Turner Marsh apprenticed with a Japanese tea merchant, remaining there alone while his Australian family continued on to San Francisco, where they settled. Young George used his time in Yokohama to become conversant in Japanese art and aesthetics, and after re-joining his family, established an Asian art gallery using the expertise he had acquired. During the 1930s, 40s and 50s, his family began designing jewelry based on their interpretation of masterful Japanese metalwork together with the favored gems of the region, jadeite, coral and pearls. The firm''s unique steel jewelry was produced by bluing and sandblasting techniques, which gave the metal its matte finish, an extraordinary base for its sparkling, gleaming gems. "Marsh had a jeweler that worked exclusively for them. He was Italian, but he also liked shotguns and, because of his interest in shotguns, he had an interest in iron and metallurgy and what they did to rifles and shotguns t ... o keep them from rusting. And the Marsh''s jewelry is steel that''s been treated with gun bluing. He sandblasted the steel before he gun blued it, that gives it this marvelous matte finish. And nowadays I don''t think there is anything more chic than the idea of black jewelry where the diamonds and the white gold absolutely pop and these marvelous pearls that he suspended have motion...The firm closed its doors in 2001." Barry Weber on the Antiques Road Show.

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Marsh Mid-20th Century Steel and Pearl Dress Set

Gallé Lamp – Celebration of Spring

An Art Nouveau cameo glass and Vienna Faience glazed figural lamp by Emile Gallé and Podany. The porcelain base is formed from three dancing women with outstretched arms holding a garland of pink roses. The blossoms echo the elegant dome-shaped rosy-hued shade. Both the inside and the outside of the shade are decorated with pink and green flowers in carved relief.

Gallé Lamp – Celebration of Spring

French Art Nouveau Games Table by Gallé

A French Art Nouveau games table by Emile Gallé, featuring inlaid fruitwood marquetry depicting thistles and card suit symbols. A similar table is pictured in: "Gallé Furniture" by Alastair Duncan and Georges de Bartha, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 2012, p. 130, plate 1.

French Art Nouveau Games Table by Gallé

French Art Nouveau "Aux Pins" Armchair by Majorelle

A French Art Nouveau carved walnut upholstered armchair, "Aux Pins," by Louis Majorelle. The chair has carved wooden sections depicting pine cones, a recurring motif in Majorelle''s naturalist vocabulary. A similar chair appears in "Majorelle - Nancy: décorations d''intérieurs: meubles, tentures, bronzes, ferronneries" (the 1906 Majorelle catalogue), as Cabinet de Travail "Les Pins", and in "The Paris Salons, 1895-1910, Volume III: Furniture," by Alastair Duncan, Antique Collectors'' Club, Publishers, page 407.

French Art Nouveau 'Aux Pins' Armchair by Majorelle

French Art Nouveau Table by Majorelle

A French Art Nouveau table by Louis Majorelle. The table top is decorated with leaves and flowering vines in fruitwood marquetry. The table''s marquetry sides are ornamented with a band of irises.

French Art Nouveau Table by Majorelle

French Art Nouveau Armchair by Majorelle

A French Art Nouveau walnut armchair by Louis Majorelle, featuring sinuously curved arms and legs. The top of the chair is decorated with an intricately carved floral motif. It is upholstered in a feather-like pattern fabric in grey, rust and browns.

French Art Nouveau Armchair by Majorelle

French Art Nouveau Wooden "Ombelle" Table by Emile Gallé

A French Art Nouveau "Ombelle" carved walnut table, by Emile Gallé. The table is decorated with fruitwood marquetry featuring a butterfly alighting on an ombelle blossom and has three carved feet. A similar table is pictured in: "Gallé Furniture" by Alastair Duncan and Georges de Bartha, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 2012, p. 202, plate 182.

French Art Nouveau Wooden 'Ombelle' Table by Emile Gallé

French Art Nouveau Wooden Table by Louis Majorelle

A French Art Nouveau mahogany center table by Louis Majorelle, the rounded top above a slightly bowed frieze, over downswept tapering channeled legs joined by a conforming undertier, ending in attenuated foliate cast sabots. A similar table is pictured in "Majorelle - Nancy: décorations d''intérieurs: meubles, tentures, bronzes, ferronneries" (the 1906 Majorelle catalogue) .

French Art Nouveau Wooden Table by Louis Majorelle

French Art Nouveau Pedestal by Selmersheim

A French Art Nouveau rosewood two-tiered pedestal by Anthony Selmersheim. While the top tier is circular, the lower shelf has four symmetric lobes. The four supports are sinuous and carved. A similar pedestal is pictured in: "The Paris Salons 1895-1915, Vol. III: Furniture," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1996, p. 464.

French Art Nouveau Pedestal by Selmersheim

French Art Nouveau Games Table by Gallé

A French Art Nouveau games table in cedar and walnut by Emile Gallé, featuring inlaid marquetry when closed and open. When closed, the marquetry decoration is of tree branches with buds and flowers and can serve as an end table. Opened, the motif is more foliate. A similar table is pictured in: "Gallé Furniture" by Alastair Duncan and Georges de Bartha, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 2012, p. 134, plates 8 and 8a.

French Art Nouveau Games Table by Gallé

French Art Nouveau Pedestal by Majorelle

A French Art Nouveau two-tier wooden pedestal by Louis Majorelle, featuring a triangular top, a clover-shaped second tier and three sinuous, carved supports. A similar table is pictured in "Majorelle - Nancy: décorations d''intérieurs: meubles, tentures, bronzes, ferronneries" (the 1906 Majorelle catalogue).

French Art Nouveau Pedestal by Majorelle

French Art Nouveau Desk by Selmersheim

A French Art Nouveau mahogany desk by Selmersheim, featuring original bronze pulls on the 14 separate drawers and the shelf that slides out from the desk''s right side.

French Art Nouveau Desk by Selmersheim

French Art Nouveau Table by Louis Majorelle

A French Art Nouveau mahogany two-tiered square table by Louis Majorelle, featuring featuring a detailed border on the top tier and bronze sabots on the legs. A similar table is pictured in "Majorelle - Nancy: décorations d''intérieurs: meubles, tentures, bronzes, ferronneries" (the 1906 Majorelle catalogue).

French Art Nouveau Table by Louis Majorelle

Majorelle Table with Detailed Border

A French Art Nouveau mahogany table by Louis Majorelle, featuring a detailed border on the top tier and bronze sabots on the legs. A similar table is pictured in "Majorelle - Nancy: décorations d''intérieurs: meubles, tentures, bronzes, ferronneries" (the 1906 Majorelle catalogue).

Majorelle Table with Detailed Border

French Art Nouveau Desk

A French Art Nouveau mahogany Ecole de Nancy desk, featuring a hand-tooled leather top, letter rack and bronze drawer pulls with a floral motif. The rounded carved details also draw inspiration from vegetal forms.

French Art Nouveau Desk

French Art Nouveau Table by Majorelle

A French Art Nouveau marquetry walnut and macassar ebony salon table by Louis Majorelle. The table top is decorated with leaves and vines. The legs have carved flowers. Pictured in "Louis Majorelle: Master of Art Nouveau Design" by Alastair Duncan, Harry N. Abrams, New York, Publishers, page 204 (plate 131, Salon furniture).

French Art Nouveau Table by Majorelle

French Art Nouveau Side Table by Edouard Colonna

A French Art Nouveau mahogany side table with carved decoration in an abstract curvilinear vegetal motif by Edouard Colonna (1862-1948). Along with Louis Comfort Tiffany, Edouard Colonna was one of the main designers who worked for Siegfried Bing and who, under Bing''s guidance, was responsible for the creation of what is known today as the Modern Style, or Art Nouveau. Colonna is remembered for his tasteful elegance and his use of abstract forms to create a graceful linear rhythm and dynamic intertwining lines. While he occasionally started with a floral motif, Colonna abstracted nature to create the impression of a flower bud or bloom held within a carefully constructed geometric scheme. This design scheme is evident in the delicate carvings ornamenting each leg of the table and in the overall rhythm of the piece. Colonna furniture, jewelry and designs for small objects like scarf and money holders would become the backbone of Bing''s business. By 1898 a number of his works were on display at Bing''s L''Art Nouveau. A similar table is pictured in: "The Paris Salons 1895-1915, Vol. III: Furniture," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1996, p. 109.

French Art Nouveau Side Table by Edouard Colonna

Art Nouveau pâte-de-verre tray by Bergé and Walter,

A French Art Nouveau glass pâte-de-verre tray designed by Henri Bergé and executed by Amalric Walter, featuring yellow, orange and green striations. The tray is adorned with an ocean scene featuring a blue/green crab atop seaweed. A similar tray is pictured in "Almaric Walter (1870-1959)" by Keith Cummings, Kingswinford (UK): Broadfield House Glass Museum, 2006, page 73 plate 113.

Art Nouveau pâte-de-verre tray by Bergé and Walter,

Walter and Finot Glass Tray

A French Art Nouveau glass pâte-de-verre paperweight (press-papiers) designed by A. Finot and executed by Amalric Walter, cast in the form of a female nude with light brown hair reclining on a bed of leaves colored in various tones of yellowish/orange and green. A similar piece, entitled Femme couchée, is pictured in: La pâte de verre, by Nöel Daum, Paris: Edition Denöel, 1984, page 105, plate 129.

Walter and Finot Glass Tray

French Art Nouveau pâte-de-verre Vase, titled "Primeveres" by Rousseau,

A French Art Deco pâte-de-verre vase, titled "Primevères" (Primroses) by Gabriel Argy-Rousseau featuring purple and red organic organic decoration in relief agains a multi-colored ground. The vase is further decorated with a purple art deco ornamental upper border. Pictured in: "G.Argy-Rousseau: Les Pâtes de Verres, catalogue raisonné" by Janine Bloch-Dermant (Paris: Les Editions de l''Amateur, 1990), page 196, cat. no. 24.02.

French Art Nouveau pâte-de-verre Vase, titled 'Primeveres' by Rousseau,

French Art Nouveau Gold Enamel, Diamond, Peridot and Plique-à-Jour ''Juliet'' Pendant

A French Art Nouveau 18 karat gold pendant with diamonds, pearls and peridots. The pendant features a plique-à-jour background with rose-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of .60 carat, 3 freshwater pearls and 3 pear and round-cut peridots with enamel decoration surrounding the profile of Juliet. Shown in the Poster House (New York) exhibition "Alphonse Mucha: Art Nouveau./Nouvelle Femme," June 20-October 6, 2019.

French Art Nouveau Gold Enamel, Diamond, Peridot and Plique-à-Jour ''Juliet'' Pendant

Art Nouveau Gold, Diamond and Enamel ''Winged Nymph'' Locket

An Art Nouveau 14 karat gold and enamel pendant locket with diamonds. The pendant is decorated with 10 old mine- and single-cut diamonds with the approximate total weight of .30 carats. The relief cover depicts a winged nymph blowing two horns. Engraved in script, "BJ June 29, 1904" on back cover. Chain is a later period addition. Pictured in Masterpieces of American Jewelry, by Judith Price, Echo Point Books & Media, LLC, 2004, page 28.

Art Nouveau Gold, Diamond and Enamel ''Winged Nymph'' Locket

René Boivin Art Deco Platinum, Peridot and Diamond Ring

A French Art Deco platinum ring with peridot and diamonds by René Boivin. The ring centers on a cushion-cut peridot with an approximate weight of 3.25 carats, surrounded by 60 pavé set round-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of 3.60 carats. With Certificate of Authenticity from Madame Françoise Cailles, expert for Boivin. René Boivin has been one of the most significant jewelry houses for the best part of a century since its late 19th Century beginnings under its founder Jules René Boivin. The significant legacy is due in no small measure to Jeanne Boivin, who took over her husband''s business after his death in 1917. Rather than wholly embracing the Art Deco trend that engulfed the rest of the French jewelry world in the late 1920s and early 1930s, she was also inspired by the exoticism that was enchanting the likes of Picasso and Paul Gauguin. Remaining close to the design greats such as Sandoz or Fouquet, she added her own feminine eye to the movement''s ideals with the help of Suzanne Belperron from 1921 to 1932. The Boivin house would go on to create many spectacular jewels famously inspired by nature and sea life. A similar ring is pictured in "Rene Boivin Jeweller", by Françoise Cailles, Quartet Books, 1994.

René Boivin Art Deco Platinum, Peridot and Diamond Ring

French Art Nouveau Bronze Sculpture by Savine

A French Art Nouveau sculpture, "Four Peacocks," by Léopold Savine, depicting the bust of a woman surrounded by four peacocks whose tails form pedestal on which her bust sits. Executed in patinated and silvered bronze. Pictured in: "Art Nouveau" by Judith Miller, p. 201; "Bronzes: Sculptors and Founders 1830-1930" by Berman, p. 775 # 2854; "Art Nouveau The French Aesthetic" by Victor Arwas page 249; and in: "Dynamic Beauty: Sculpture of Art Nouveau Paris" by Macklowe Gallery, The Studley Press, 2011, p.236.

French Art Nouveau Bronze Sculpture by Savine

French Art Nouveau Gilt Bronze Vide-Poche by Rousseau

A French Art Nouveau gilt bronze figural vide-poche by Loiseau-Rousseau titled "Riding the Wave," with the head of a woman situated below a breaking wave. The vide-poche has the shape of a sea shell. Pictured in: "Dynamic Beauty: Sculpture of Art Nouveau Paris" by Macklowe Gallery, The Studley Press, 2011, p. 202.

French Art Nouveau Gilt Bronze Vide-Poche by Rousseau

French Art Nouveau Bisque Ceramic Sculpture titled "Danseuse Tambourin à Gauche" by Leonard and Sevres

A French Art Nouveau ceramic bisque figural sculpture by Agathon Léonard, featuring a woman dancing with a tambourine, titled "La danse du tambourin, tete penchée à gauche" ("The tambourine dance, head leaning to the left"}, from the series "Le jeu d''écharpe." Le jeu d''écharpe, created by Agathon Léonard at the turn of the 20th century, consists of 15 sculptures of young women in various poses. Some women dance with scarves; others hold musical instruments or carry flaming torches. Each of the 15 dancers is unique in terms of her pose, hair style and dress. Their dresses exhibit fluid drapery with flowing sleeves. The series was produced in both bronze and ceramic. Le jeu d''écharpe was inspired by the dancer Loïe Fuller. Pictured in: "Dynamic Beauty: Sculpture of Art Nouveau Paris" by Macklowe Gallery, The Studley Press, 2011, p. 187; and in: Agathon Léonard: Le geste Art Nouveau, by Ingelore Böstge, Paris: Somogy editions d''art, 2003, p. 51, cat. no. 12.

French Art Nouveau Bisque Ceramic Sculpture titled 'Danseuse Tambourin à Gauche' by Leonard and Sevres

Art Nouveau Bisque Ceramic Sculpture by Agathon Leonard titled "Danseuse au Cothurne"

A French Art Nouveau bisque ceramic figural sculpture by Agathon Léonard, featuring a woman holding her dress with her right hand. Titled "Danseuse au cothurne" from "Le jeu de l''écharpe." This figure is one of the "la danse" (the dance) set, originally produced and cast by Sèvres and presented by the artist at the 1900 Paris Exposition Universelle. A cothurne (English translation cothurnus) was a laced boot worn by actors in Greek and Roman tragedies. Le jeu d''écharpe, created by Agathon Léonard at the turn of the 20th century, consists of 15 sculptures of young women in various poses. Some women dance with scarves; others hold musical instruments or carry flaming torches. Each of the 15 dancers is unique in terms of her pose, hair style and dress. Their dresses exhibit fluid drapery with flowing sleeves. The series was produced in both bronze and ceramic. Le jeu d''echarpe was inspired by the dancer Loïe Fuller. This smaller size series is extremely rare. A similar model is pictured in "Agathon Léonard: Le geste Art Nouveau" by Ingelore Boestge, Somogy editions d''art, Paris 2003, p.51, Plate number 13.

Art Nouveau Bisque Ceramic Sculpture by Agathon Leonard titled 'Danseuse au Cothurne'

French Art Nouveau Silvered Figural Sculpture by Leonard

A French Art Nouveau silvered bronze figural sculpture by Agathon Léonard featuring a woman dancing titled "Danseuse chantant" (singing dancer). This figure is one of "Le jeu d''écharpe" (The Scarf Set), originally produced and cast by Sèvres, and awarded a Gold Medal at the 1900 Paris Exposition Universelle. The series was later cast in bronze by the Susse Frères foundry, with special limited editions in silvered bronze, such as this piece. Le jeu d''écharpe, created by Agathon Léonard at the turn of the 20th century, consists of 15 sculptures of young women in various poses. Some women dance with scarves; others hold musical instruments or carry flaming torches. Each of the 15 dancers is unique in terms of her pose, hair style and dress. Their dresses exhibit fluid drapery with flowing sleeves. Le jeu d''echarpe was inspired by the dancer Loïe Fuller. A similar model is pictured in "Agathon Léonard: Le geste Art nouveau," by Ingelore Boestge, Somogy editions d''art, Paris 2003, p.62, Plate number 35. Provenance: Elizabeth Taylor

French Art Nouveau Silvered Figural Sculpture by Leonard

Art Nouveau Patinated Bronze Figural Sculpture by Ségoffin

A French Art Nouveau patinated bronze figural sculpture, depicting a dancer with scarves and cymbals by Victor Ségoffin (1867-1925). Born in Toulouse, educated at Ecole nationale superieure des Beaux-Arts in Paris under Louis-Ernest Barrias and Pierre-Jules Cavelier, Segoffin won the Prix de Rome for sculpture in 1897.

Art Nouveau Patinated Bronze Figural Sculpture by Ségoffin

Art Nouveau Silver and Enamel Vase by Feuillatre

A French Art Nouveau silver and enamel vase by Eugène Feuillatre. The vase is decorated with leafed branches holding pink and gold cloisonné flowers and buds against a sky blue background. It rests on a braided silver stand with three carved feet. The rim is decorated with silver scarabs. A similar vase is pictured in: "Art Nouveau: The French Aesthetic", by Victor Arwas, London: Andreas Papadakis, 2002, p. 397.

Art Nouveau Silver and Enamel Vase by Feuillatre

Bronze Figural Jardiniere by Marionnet

A French Art Nouveau patinated bronze figural jardiniere by Alfred Marionnet. The body of the jardinere is decorated with a nude female embracing the vessel. The woman''s naked feed extend beyond the jardinere''s curving form. The vessel is also decorated with branches that have leaves and berries in relief. The rim of the jardinere is encircled by entwined branches.

Bronze Figural Jardiniere by Marionnet

Enamel and Bronze "Femme-fleur Lily" by Godet

A French Art Nouveau enameled bronze Femme Fleur by Henri Godet (1863-1937). The sculpture depicts the patinated bronze head and neck of a young woman growing out of an enameled red and yellow lily flower. It rests on a red marble base, with the flower perched on a green enameled leaf decorated with a gilt bronze flower. Literature: Alastair Duncan, "Art Nouveau Sculpture," New York, Rizzoli International, 1978, p. 47, for another example from the collection of Victor Arwas. "Dynamic Beauty: Sculpture of Art Nouveau Paris", Macklowe Gallery, New York, 2011 exhibition catalogue; pp. 133-34 for similar examples from this rare series, and p. 135 for an identical example on another base from a later date.

Enamel and Bronze 'Femme-fleur Lily' by Godet

Bronze Vase by Charles Korschann

A French Art Nouveau patinated bronze vase by Charles Korschann. The vase features an ascending spiraling band decorated with cloud-like swirls, women''s faces, pansy blossoms and stars.

Bronze Vase by Charles Korschann

French Art Nouveau Bronze Bust by Chalon

A French Art Nouveau gilt bronze bust of a woman by Louis Chalon, "The Sunflower at Dawn." The young woman wears her wavy hair loose, with a headband decorated with a feather and flower. Her right shoulder is ornamented with drapery and a floral-motif brooch. A large sunflower covers her bare breasts. A similar bust is pictured in: "Dynamic Beauty: Sculpture of Art Nouveau Paris", by Macklowe Gallery, The Studley Press, 2011, p. 111.

French Art Nouveau Bronze Bust by Chalon

Austrian Art Nouveau Bust of Ophelia by Josef Öfner

An Austrian Art Nouveau patinated bronze bust of Ophelia by Josef Öfner. Like the sculpture by Maurice Bouval, Öfner depicts Ophelia as a sleeping woman adorned with flowers. The sculpture rests on a painted wood base. The Austrian sculptor Josef Öfner (born in Tannheim, Austria in 1868) studied under Auguste Kühne and Otto König and was active in Vienna around the turn-of-the-20th-century. Like many of his peers, Öfner applied his skills to both decorative and visual arts, producing gilt bronze vases and trays in addition to figural busts. Pictured in: "Dynamic Beauty: Sculpture of Art Nouveau Paris", by Macklowe Gallery, The Studley Press, 2011, p. 218.

Austrian Art Nouveau Bust of Ophelia by Josef Öfner

Tiffany Studios "Cypriote" Miniature Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York glass "Cypriote" vase, featuring a mottled and multi-textured lava-like finish, with an uneven border. The vase has a dark background with iridescent green, blue, purple and metallic swirls. Cypriote is a textured glass achieved at Tiffany Glass and Decorating Company by rolling glass over a marble or iron surface covered with pulverized bits of the same glass. Its iridescence and bubbles resembled the decomposed surface of Roman glass discovered during archeological explorations on the island of Cyprus, hence its name. Lava glass evolved from Cypriote glass by using thicker, brighter glass and dripping golden glass irregularly over the surface. A similar vase is pictured in: "The Art of Glass: Art Nouveau to Art Deco" by Victor Arwas, London: Andreas Papadakis, 1996, p. 40, plate 50.

Tiffany Studios 'Cypriote' Miniature Vase

Tiffany Studios New York Glass and Bronze "Peacock" Mirror

A Tiffany Studios New York glass and bronze "Peacock" mirror, featuring a finely sculpted patinated bronze base decorated with stylized peacock feathers, accented with multi-colored Favrile glass mosaic tiles. The peacock feather was a favorite motif of Louis Comfort Tiffany. Pictured in: "Tiffany at Auction," by Alastair Duncan, p. 47, cat. no. 127, and in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware," by Alastair Duncan, page 402, plate # 1626.

Tiffany Studios New York Glass and Bronze 'Peacock' Mirror

Tiffany Studios New York "Tel el Amarna" Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York "Tel el Amarna" vase featuring iridescent brown, coffee and gold Favrile glass with an Egyptian-inspired motif. A vase with similar colors and decoration is pictured in: "Tiffany at Auction" by Alastair Duncan, New York: Rizzoli, 1981, p. 17, #19.

Tiffany Studios New York 'Tel el Amarna' Vase

Tiffany Studios New York Favrile Glass Floriform Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York Favrile glass floriform vase with a bulbous bowl and elongated internal spiral twisted stem. The vase features a white pulled leaf motif outlined in deep orange/red with a white feathered swirl decoration which is also duplicated on the foot. Favrile glass vases in the shapes of stylized flowers were among the earliest creations of the Tiffany Glass and Decorating Company, forerunner of Tiffany Studios. Initial examples of this technique date from approximately 1894, although later pieces show greater refinement. Flower forms have great variety in stem length and rim shape. A vase with a similar motif is pictured in: "Tiffany Favrile Glass and the Quest of Beauty" by Martin Eidelberg, New York: Lillian Nassau LLC, 2007, p. 43.

Tiffany Studios New York Favrile Glass Floriform Vase

Tiffany Wheel Carved Favrile Glass Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York wheel carved Favrile glass vase. The vase is globe shaped and features a band of red nasturtiums and green lily pads against an opalescent glass ground. A vase with similar motif is pictured in: "Louis Comfort Tiffany" by Jacob Baal-Teshuva, New York: Taschen, 2001, p. 287; and in: Alastair Duncan, "Louis C. Tiffany: The Garden Museum Collection", Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 2004, p. 245 (top left).

Tiffany Wheel Carved Favrile Glass Vase

Tiffany Studios New York Favrile Glass Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York Favrile glass vase with iridescent pulled decoration in the style of a Hopi vase. Louis Comfort Tiffany had more than five hundred Native North American objects, including baskets, implements, and articles of clothing from the Pacific Nothwest on display at his home in Laurelton Hall. Many of these objects were on view in a special oblong room that had once been a bowling alley. Baskets, pottery, and textiles also served as decorative accents throughout the house. This vase pays tribute to Tiffany''s collection. In its color, shape, and decoration it resembles a work of Native American Hopi pottery and shows the influence of this art form on Tiffany''s own work. Favrile is the trade name Tiffany gave to his blown art glass. The name derives from the Latin word fabrilis, meaning "made by hand." The technique was developed at the Tiffany Glass and Decorating Company in the mid-1890s using filaments from batches of differently colored glass and working the material while the glass was still molten. Ornamentation was added before the piece had its final shape, so that the decoration became fully integrated into the vessel. The technique was used in both decorative vases and functional pieces such as tableware (bowls, goblets, carafes) and lamp shades. Tiffany intended the favrile designation as a guarantee to current customers and future collectors of the fine quality of these objects.

Tiffany Studios New York Favrile Glass Vase

Tiffany Studios New York Favrile Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York Favrile decorated vase. This vase features pulled copper decoration with iridescent gold trim against a golden ivory ground. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: "Louis C. Tiffany: Artist for the Ages" by Marilynn A. Johnson, London: Scala Publishers, Ltd., 2005, p. 229, cat. no. 131. Favrile is the trade name Tiffany gave to his blown art glass. The name derives from the Latin word fabrilis, meaning "made by hand." The technique was developed at Tiffany Furnaces in the mid-1890s using filaments from batches of differently colored glass and working the material while the glass was still molten. Ornamentation was added before the piece had its final shape, so that the decoration became fully integrated into the vessel. The technique was used in both decorative vases and functional pieces such as tableware (bowls, goblets, carafes) and lamp shades. Tiffany intended the favrile designation as a guarantee to current customers and future collectors of the fine quality of these objects.

Tiffany Studios New York  Favrile Vase

Tiffany Studios New York "Paperweight" Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York "Paperweight" glass vase, featuring yellow daffodils with green stems. The paperweight technique involved fusing thin rods of transparent glass in a variety of colors. The resulting thicker rod was cut into thin pieces that were then worked into clear glass. A similar vase is pictured in: "Louis Comfort Tiffany at Tiffany & Co." by John Loring, New York: Harry N. Abrams, Inc., 2002, page 158.

Tiffany Studios New York  'Paperweight' Vase

Tiffany Studios New York Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York favrile vase with pulled decoration. The vase has an iridescent background graduating from opalescent through yellow and pink to orange, with dark red swirls. Favrile is the trade name Tiffany gave to his blown art glass. The name derives from the Latin word fabrilis, meaning "made by hand." The technique was developed at Tiffany Furnaces in the mid-1890s using filaments from batches of differently colored glass and working the material while the glass was still molten. Ornamentation was added before the piece had its final shape, so that the decoration became fully integrated into the vessel. The technique was used in both decorative vases and functional pieces such as tableware (bowls, goblets, carafes) and lamp shades. Tiffany intended the favrile designation as a guarantee to current customers and future collectors of the fine quality of these objects.

Tiffany Studios New York Vase

Tiffany Studios New York Glass Vase

An early Tiffany Studios New York favrile glass vase with pulled decoration. The vase features iridescent swirls in pinks and blues on a translucent pale brown background. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: "Louis C. Tiffany: Artist for the Ages" by Marilynn A. Johnson, London: Scala Publishers, Ltd., 2005, p. 228, cat. 130. Also in the collection of the Victorian Albert Museum, documented in "Louis C. Tiffany: The Collected Works of Robert Koch," Atglen, PA: Schiffer, 2001, page 316.

Tiffany Studios New York Glass Vase

Tiffany Studios "Flower-Form" Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York "Flower-Form" vase, featuring a green pulled-feather decoration on a cream ground. The vase has a goblet top and applied foot. Favrile glass vases in the shapes of stylized flowers were among the earliest creations of the Tiffany Glass and Decorating Company, forerunner of Tiffany Studios. Initial examples of this technique date from approximately 1894, although later pieces show greater refinement. Flower forms have great variety in stem length and rim shape. A similar vase is pictured in: "Louis C. Tiffany: Rebel in Glass", by Robert Koch (in "Louis C. Tiffany: The Collected Works of Robert Koch," Atglen, PA: Schiffer Publishing Ltd., 2001, p. 94).

Tiffany Studios 'Flower-Form' Vase

Favrile "Paperweight" Tiffany Glass Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York favrile "paperweight" glass vase decorated with a band of white daisies with long green stems and enhanced with red accents. The paperweight technique involved fusing thin rods of transparent glass in a variety of colors. The resulting thicker rod was cut into thin pieces and were then worked into clear glass. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: "Louis C. Tiffany: The Collected Works of Robert Koch," Atglen, PA: Schiffer Publishing Ltd., 2001, p. 106.

Favrile 'Paperweight' Tiffany Glass Vase

Glass "Paperweight" Tiffany Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York favrile glass "paperweight" vase, depicting a band of white daisies with green leaves. The paperweight technique involved fusing thin rods of transparent glass in a variety of colors. The resulting thicker rod was cut into thin pieces and were then worked into clear glass. A similar vase is pictured in: "Louis Comfort Tiffany at Tiffany & Co.," by John Loring, New York: Harry N. Abrams, Inc., 2002, page 158.

Glass 'Paperweight' Tiffany Vase

Tiffany Studios New York "Nasturtium" Paperweight Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York "Nasturtium" Paperweight vase featuring purple nasturtium blossoms with green leaves set within a golden, translucent ground. Provenance: The Garden Museum Collection, Matsue, Japan. The paperweight technique involved fusing thin rods of transparent glass in a variety of colors. The resulting thicker rod was but into thin pieces and were then worked into clear glass. This vase is pictured in: "Louis C. Tiffany: The Garden Museum Collection," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 2004, p. 260.

Tiffany Studios New York 'Nasturtium' Paperweight Vase

Tiffany Studios New York Glass "Peacock" Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York Favrile glass "Peacock" vase with iridescent pulled decoration stylized to look like peacock feathers by Louis Comfort Tiffany. The peacock feather was a favorite motif of Louis Comfort Tiffany. Shown in Strut: The Peacock and Beauty in Art at the Hudson River Museum, October 11, 2014 to January 18, 2015. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: "Tiffany Favrile Glass and the Quest of Beauty," by Martin Eidelberg, New York: Lillian Nassau LLC, 2007, p. 46.

Tiffany Studios New York Glass 'Peacock' Vase

French Art Deco Red Coral, Diamond and Platinum Ring

A French Art Deco platinum ring with diamonds and red coral. The ring has a red coral cabochon and 20 old European-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of .20 carat. The ring is composed of diamond-set step shoulders, and a deeply scrolled gallery with an Art Deco design carriage.

French Art Deco Red Coral, Diamond and Platinum Ring

Pickslay & Co. Arts & Crafts Chrysoberyl and Gold Cuff Links

A pair of Arts & Crafts 18 karat gold cuff links with chrysoberyl by Pickslay & Co.. The cuff links have 4 bezel-set oval chrysoberyl stones surrounded by gold swirl motif frames.Double sided. Pickslay & Co. was founded by Charles Pickslay who was born in England and got his start at Theo. B. Starr, New York Jewelers. Gustav Manz was one of his suppliers. Similar cuff links discussed in "Cuff Links", by Susan Jonas and Marilyn Nissenson, Abrams, 1991, page 29-50.

Pickslay & Co. Arts & Crafts Chrysoberyl and Gold Cuff Links

Marcus & Co. Art Nouveau Pearl, Diamond and Emerald Brooch

An Art Nouveau brooch with pearls, diamonds and emerald by Marcus & Co. The brooch has 10 semi-spherical pearls, 15 Old European-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of 1.25 carats and a polished emerald drop. Gemological Institute of America certificate #2171449596 states the pearls are natural saltwater button pearls. The multi-generational New York firm of Marcus & Co was founded by an ambitious young German immigrant who had trained at a prominent Dresden court jeweler. In 1892, after working with Charles Lewis Tiffany, Hermann Marcus and his sons William and George together set up a business that soon became a glittering New York society institution renowned not only for its superb diamonds, colored stones and pearls, but also its instantly recognizable, original design style. The firm produced great jewels in the Art Nouveau and Arts & Crafts sensibility, with George, the artist/designer, drawing inspiration from sources as diverse and exotic as the contemporary French masters, the Moghuls and Maharajahs, the garland style of the Ancien Regime, and the genius of Renaissance goldsmiths. George''s distinctive, confident hand was always discernible in Marcus creations. Working as a team with George, his brother William was a gem and pearl connoisseur who travelled the world hunting fine gem material, including purchasing the entire production of never-before-se ... en black opal in Lightning Ridge Australia in 1908. Marcus exhibited at the 1900 Exposition Universelle in Paris, and their work won prizes at the prestigious Society of Arts & Crafts of Boston. Plique-a-jour enamel was an art in which Marcus & Co. excelled, creating jewels with unprecedented three-dimensional depth in this medium. The firm and family were well-known for their charitable activities and promotion of young jewelers such as Raymond Yard.

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Marcus & Co. Art Nouveau Pearl, Diamond and Emerald Brooch

Marcus & Co. Art Nouveau White Opal and Chrysoprase, Plique-à-Jour Enamel and Gold Pendant Brooch

An American Art Nouveau 18 karat gold and enamel pendant brooch with opals and chrysoprase by Marcus & Co.. The pendant brooch has 6 cabochon white opals, 63 cabochon chrysoprase stones and plique-à-jour enamel. Suspended from the brooch is an opal and chrysoprase pendant drop. Detachable brooch finding and flip-down bail. The multi-generational New York firm of Marcus & Co was founded by an ambitious young German immigrant who had trained at a prominent Dresden court jeweler. In 1892, after working with Charles Lewis Tiffany, Hermann Marcus and his sons William and George together set up a business that soon became a glittering New York society institution renowned not only for its superb diamonds, colored stones and pearls, but also its instantly recognizable, original design style. The firm produced great jewels in the Art Nouveau and Arts & Crafts sensibility, with George, the artist/designer, drawing inspiration from sources as diverse and exotic as the contemporary French masters, the Moghuls and Maharajahs, the garland style of the Ancien Regime, and the genius of Renaissance goldsmiths. George''s distinctive, confident hand was always discernible in Marcus creations. Working as a team with George, his brother William was a gem and pearl connoisseur who travelled the world hunting fine gem material, including purchasing the entire production of never-before-seen black ... opal in Lightning Ridge Australia in 1908. Marcus exhibited at the 1900 Exposition Universelle in Paris, and their work won prizes at the prestigious Society of Arts & Crafts of Boston. Plique-a-jour enamel was an art in which Marcus & Co. excelled, creating jewels with unprecedented three-dimensional depth in this medium. The firm and family were well-known for their charitable activities and promotion of young jewelers such as Raymond Yard. Shown in the Poster House (New York) exhibition "Alphonse Mucha: Art Nouveau./Nouvelle Femme," June 20-October 6, 2019.

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Marcus & Co. Art Nouveau White Opal and Chrysoprase, Plique-à-Jour Enamel and Gold Pendant Brooch

Van Cleef & Arpels Paris Art Deco Diamond and Platinum Cufflinks

A pair of French Art Deco platinum cuff links with diamonds by Van Cleef & Arpels. The cuff links have 8 baguette diamonds with an approximate total weight of .70 carat. The double sided cuff links are designed in a graphic Art Deco motif with the baguette diamond details.

Van Cleef & Arpels Paris Art Deco Diamond and Platinum Cufflinks

French Art Nouveau Cabinet by Emile Gallé

A French Art Nouveau "Grenouilles" beechwood cabinet by Emile Gallé. This carved cabinet features dragonfly, mushroom, and landscape marquetry decoration, as well as carved frog-leg feet and a pierced dragonfly design in the top gallery. The panel for the key escutcheon is cast in bronze with the complementary pattern (left and right) in carved wood. Similar cabinet pictured in: "Art Nouveau Furniture," by Alastair Duncan, p. 74, no. 62. As well as in Emile Gallé, by Philippe Garner, p. 84

French Art Nouveau Cabinet by Emile Gallé

Tiffany Studios New York Favrile Glass Vase

A Louis Comfort Tiffany favrile glass "Red Hooked Feather" vase, featuring a rich red color enhanced by an iridescent multicolored pulled feather motif that encircles the vase. Favrile is the trade name Tiffany gave to his blown art glass. The name derives from the Latin word fabrilis, meaning "made by hand." The technique was developed at the Tiffany Glass and Decorating Company in the mid-1890s using filaments from batches of differently colored glass and working the material while the glass was still molten. Ornamentation was added before the piece had its final shape, so that the decoration became fully integrated into the vessel. The technique was used in both decorative vases and functional pieces such as tableware (bowls, goblets, carafes) and lamp shades. Tiffany intended the favrile designation as a guarantee to current customers and future collectors of the fine quality of these objects.

Tiffany Studios New York Favrile Glass Vase

French Art Nouveau Ceramic Clock by Follot

An Austrian Art Nouveau porcelain and silvered clock by Paul Follot. This clock prominently features the arabesquing line of the Art Nouveau movement, both in shape and in the relief decoration. Abstract blue flower buds decorate the clock in panels at the top and behind the clock face. The silvered clock face and pendulum are also decorated in the whiplash motif, which makes this clock a complete and total work of Art Nouveau. A similar clock is pictured in: "Art Nouveau: The French Aesthetic," by Victor Arwas, London: Andreas Papadakis, 2002, p. 333; a similar clock is also pictured in the 1904 Louis Majorelle catalog, in the "Les Algues" Chamber, near the end of the catalog.

French Art Nouveau Ceramic Clock by Follot

Tiffany Studios "Agate" Vase

An Agate Favrile glass vase by Tiffany Studios New York. This vase has dark vertical lines on a beige ground. The vertical theme is further emphasized by several ribs in the body of the vase, Louis Comfort Tiffany''s love of nature extended to the pebbles and small stones that washed up on the shores of Long Island and New England. This inspired him a create a glass that imitated cut agate. Illustrated by this vase, the intent was to suggest the striations found in veined stones, which were usually very opaque.

Tiffany Studios 'Agate' Vase

Tiffany Studios New York Favrile Paperweight Vase

A Favrile "paperweight" vase by Tiffany Studios New York. The earliest examples of "paperweight" objects appeared around 1900, Louis Comfort Tiffany loved this technique of encasing a design within a dome of transparent glass because it was a great vehicle for expressing his love of nature, particularly flowers. This vase is internally decorated with gladiolus flowers with yellow, green and purple threads. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: "The Art Glass of Louis Comfort Tiffany," by Paul E. Doros, New York: The Vendome Press, 2013, p. 136, fig.82. Also pictured in "Louis Comfort Tiffany," by Jacob Baal-Teshuva, New York: Taschen, 2001, page 291.

Tiffany Studios New York Favrile Paperweight Vase

French Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

A French wheel carved cameo glass vase by Daum. The making of this vase combined the technique of hammering for the foot and wheel carving for the flower decorations. The background is made of opalescent glass, with green and orange flowers standing against it. The hammered foot is in a darker orange/red color.

French Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

French Cameo and Martelé Glass "Crocus" Vase by Daum

A French wheel carved cameo and martelé glass "Crocus" vase by Daum. This Daum vase has gray cameo glass. It is decorated with stems and leaves ascending from the bulbous foot leading to padded and wheel-carved crocus flowers. The crocus flowers are arranged in a variation of purple and orange over white. The overall decoration is set against a background of mottled blue, shading to yellow and lavender. A similar vase is pictured in: "Daum Frères: Maîtres Verriers, 1892-1935," by Katharina Büttiker-Weber, Zurich: Galerie Katharina Büttiker, 1986, cat. no. 73.

French Cameo and Martelé Glass 'Crocus' Vase by Daum

French ''Ecureuils dans l''herbe", pâte de verre vase by Argy-Rousseau

A French ''Ecureuils dans l''herbe" pâte de verre vase by Gabriel Argy-Rousseau. Nature, notably flowers and insects, held an important place among the themes developed by Argy-Rousseau. He belongs to this generation of artists who, rebelling against a growing urbanization, seek refuge in nature, This vase depicts a squirrel playing in the grass. A similar piece is pictured in: cf. J. Bloch-Dermont, Les Pâtes de Verre G. Argy-Rousseau Catalogue Raisonné, Paris, 1990, p. 216, no. 28.05. for another vase of this model.

French ''Ecureuils dans l''herbe', pâte de verre vase by Argy-Rousseau

French Art Nouveau cameo glass vase by Émile Gallé

A French Art Nouveau cameo glass vase by Émile Gallé. This large vase is decorated with wheel carved purple trumpet-creepers and vines against a green background. The flowers and vines climb up the ribbed neck of the vase. The "liseron" vase is a flattened baluster form vase with an everted mouth, rounded and polished rim, long slender-waisted neck, short globular body, and an applied disk foot. The vase features an intercalaire layer of coarse jade frit in the top three-quarters of the vase and fine indigo frit in the bottom quarter of the vase. To construct the vase, a bubble was blown into the gather, which was cased and parison inflated into a dip mold with 19 ribs. The stem was subsequently plucked out and twisted counterclockwise. Finally, a soffieta was used to open the mouth and a pair of jacks was used to evert the rim. The vase was later cameo cut with exquisite detailing in the venation and the hirsute texture of the leaves. The vase depicts eight heads of Liseron japonais (Ipomoea nil ([Japanese morning glory].) The flower was introduced to Nancy by Takashima Hokkai, a fellow member of the Ecole de Nancy and Japanese Director of Forestry. Hokkai was invited as a juror for the Central Nancy Horticultural society exhibition of 1887. At the exhibition, Gallé presented Hokkai a Japanese morning glory in thanks for his contributions to the field of horticulture. T ... he Japanese morning glory adorned the walls of Gallé''s studio until his death in 1904. To accompany this oriental flower, Gallé has given the morning glories a jade background. Commonly featured in the eighteenth century Shigemasa Kitao birds and flower prints that Gallé consulted, the creation of a jade simulant is only fitting for this oriental flower.

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French Art Nouveau cameo glass vase by Émile Gallé

French Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

A French cameo glass vase by Daum. This beautiful vase, moving from blue to yellow and orange, imitates the sun setting on water, representing water lilies.

French Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

French ''Grande berce des prés'' Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

A French ''Grande berce des prés'' cameo glass vase by Daum. The vase is a progression from green hammered glass on the top to a clearer glass with shades of pink and finally back to the hammering technique on the foot. It is decorated with flowers and leaves on long stems.

French ''Grande berce des prés'' Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

French "Musiciens Grecs" pâte de verre Vase by Gabriel Argy-Rousseau

A French "Musiciens Grecs" pâte de verre vase by Gabriel Argy-Rousseau. One of Argy-Rousseau''s most important source of inspiration was Ancient Greece, and the subject matter of this vase relates to that theme. Against a pale pink background stands a musician playing the lyre, one of the most emblematic Greek instruments. The frieze on the bottom of the vase reminds one of the magnificent friezes in Greek temples. A similar piece is pictured in: cf. J. Bloch-Dermont, Les Pâtes de Verre G. Argy-Rousseau Catalogue Raisonné, Paris, 1990, p. 216, no. 28.03 for another vase of this model.

French 'Musiciens Grecs' pâte de verre Vase by Gabriel Argy-Rousseau

French Art Nouveau silver and plique-à-jour "Capucines" Enamel Clock

A rare French Art Nouveau silver and plique-à-jour enamel "Capucines" clock with butterflies and nasturtiums by Eugène Feuillâtre. The front and sides of the clock are decorated with enameled orange flowers and green leaves. The top and back are gold-washed and heavily engraved with flowers and vines. The clock face features two painted butterflies. Provenance: Collection of Jerome Shaw, Florida A similar clock is pictured in: "The Paris Salons 1895-1915, Vol. V: Objects d''Art and Metalware," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1999, p. 255. Exhibited: La Société des Artistes Français, 1902.

French Art Nouveau silver and plique-à-jour 'Capucines' Enamel Clock

Georges Fouquet French Art Nouveau Opal, Pearl, Gold and Plique-à-Jour Enamel Pendant Necklace

A French Art Nouveau gold and plique-à-jour enamel pendant with opals, freshwater and natural pearls by Georges Fouquet. The pendant has 11 opals, 13 freshwater pearls and one natural saltwater pearl. The pendant is designed in a flowing foliate motif with plique-à-jour enamel leaves floating over translucent opals and decorated with clusters of pearls. With signed G. Fouquet box. Shown in the Poster House (New York) exhibition "Alphonse Mucha: Art Nouveau./Nouvelle Femme," June 20-October 6, 2019.

Georges Fouquet French Art Nouveau Opal, Pearl, Gold and Plique-à-Jour Enamel Pendant Necklace

Tiffany Studios New York Bluish Green Favrile Glass Vase

A bluish green Favrile glass vase by Louis Comfort Tiffany featuring a pulled silver iridescent border. Favrile is the trade name Tiffany gave to his blown art glass. The name derives from the Latin word fabrilis, meaning "made by hand." The technique was developed at the Tiffany Glass and Decorating Company in the mid-1890s using filaments from batches of differently colored glass and working the material while the glass was still molten. Ornamentation was added before the piece had its final shape, so that the decoration became fully integrated into the vessel. The technique was used in both decorative vases and functional pieces such as tableware (bowls, goblets, carafes) and lamp shades. Tiffany intended the favrile designation as a guarantee to current customers and future collectors of the fine quality of these objects.

Tiffany Studios New York Bluish Green Favrile Glass Vase

"Femme au Pieuvre" French Art Nouveau Glazed Ceramic Inkwell by Rupert Carabin

A French Art Nouveau "Femme-Pieuvre," brown glazed ceramic inkwell by Rupert Carabin, wherein a woman ecstatically rips open the head of an octopus, spilling its ink. A beautiful play on an ancient mean of sourcing ink, this sculpture''s tranquility and solidity give it the aura of an ancient carving. Pictured in: "The Paris Salons 1895-1914, volume IV: Ceramics and Glass" by Alastair Duncan, p.76; "L''Oeuvre de Rupert Carabin 1862-1932, Catalogue D''exposition, Galerie du Luxembourg", 1974, pp.229 and 232; "Art Nouveau, Sculpture" by Alastair Duncan, Academy Edition, 1978, p.20; and in: "Le Modern style" by Laurence Buffet-Challié, p.74, plat 2.

'Femme au Pieuvre' French Art Nouveau Glazed Ceramic Inkwell by Rupert Carabin

French Art Nouveau Ceramic Inkwell by Carabin

A French Art Nouveau "Femme à la Coloquinte," glazed ceramic inkwell by François-Rupert Carabin. The inkwell features a nude woman embracing an unusually large gourd. A similar sculpture is pictured in: "L''ouevre de Rupert Carabin, 1982-1932," catalogue of the exhibition at le Musée du Luxembourg, Paris, 1974, p. 230, cat. no. 189.

French Art Nouveau Ceramic Inkwell by Carabin

Stoneware Mask by Rupert Carabin

A French stoneware mortuary mask by Rupert Carabin. The mask is of a man''s face. It is finished in beige and brown glaze. In the pursuit of sophisticated anatomical knowledge, Rupert Carabin attended public dissections at the Paris faculty of medicine. While there, he became acquainted with Jules Talrich, the presider of public dissections and head ceroplastician. Soon after, Rupert Carabin began an apprenticeship with the anatomist. In the midst of his training, Carabin sold mortuary masks for 100 F a head, the equivalent of $1100 in today''s money. The lucrative occupation allowed him to support himself while pursuing his true passion of erotic sculpture. Mortuary masks were modeled when the face of the deceased was too damaged to display, and embalming was no longer a sufficient method of repair. This rare intact example renders the deceased in an entirely unidealized state 8-12 hours after death. The face is in a supine position with the head turned three-quarters to the right. The skin shows significant bloating, livor mortis (wine-colored discoloration from blood pooling in the vessels), and tardieu spots (dark pinpoint spots created from ruptured capillaries). Carabin created this effect through a slip of iron oxide and an uneven beige and brown glaze. Carabin was known to have added pestled human ashes to his glazes, an addition that was most likely responsible for ... the mask''s irregular complexion and dramatic variation in color. This work is signed Carabin and bears a monogram representing a cat. Étienne Eichholtzer. "Le fonds photographique de François-Rupert Carabin (1890-1915) : le regard dévoilé ." Art et histoire de l''art. 2014. Ffdumas-01547084f Brunhammer, Y., and C. Merklen. 1974." L''Oeuvre de Rupert Carabin, 1862-1932." Paris: Galerie du Luxembourg. Universite´ de Nantes. 1980. [Actes du] Colloque de Nantes, 21-24 Avril 1976. 1, 1. Paris: Minard. Stead, E´vanghe´lia. 2013." La chair du livre: mate´rialite´, imaginaire et poe´tique du livre fin-de-sie`cle." Paris: PUPS. Reprinted as No. 195 p. 237 and p. 231 of the book The work of Rupert Carabin 1862-1932

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Stoneware Mask by Rupert Carabin

Art Deco Diamond, Sapphire and Platinum Plaque Ring

An Art Deco platinum ring with diamonds and sapphires. The ring has a center oval diamond with an approximate weight of .80 carat, I/J color, VS clarity and 60 old European-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of 1.20 carats, and 12 calibre-cut sapphires. The ring is designed in a classic Art Deco plaque motif.

Art Deco Diamond, Sapphire and Platinum Plaque Ring

"Byzantine Heads" lithographs by Alphonse Mucha

A pair of French "Byzantine Heads" lithographs by Alphonse Mucha. The mastery evident in creating two archetypes of the female form against a decorative background confirms Mucha''s artistic maturity. Both women, portrayed in profile, have their heads decorated with beautiful jewelry, the richness and oriental nature of which suggested the name Byzantine Heads for the series. The subtle differences in details between the images are worth noticing. This is the first appearance of the perfect form of Mucha''s often-used motif, a circle framing each head interrupted by a strand of hair. With this device, it is as if Mucha''s unreachable beauties have broken the magic border between themselves and their admirers and suggest the possibility that they might, perhaps, meet. (Mucha/Art Nouveau, p. 192). In this version, Mucha added corners filigreed with curves to the original circular designs in order to create the standard rectangular shape of decorative panels. This is the rarest of all variants. Pictured in "Alphonse Mucha, The Complete Posters and Panels", by Jack Rennert and Alain Weill, page 167, cat. 40, variant 1.

'Byzantine Heads' lithographs by Alphonse Mucha

Marsh Mid-20th Century Patinated Steel, Palladium, Pearl and Diamond Ring

An American patinated steel, palladium, mabé pearl and diamond ring, by G.T. Marsh. The ring centers on a 15.4mm Mabé pearl flanked by 6 round brilliant-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of .30 carat, mounted in patinated steel, completed by a palladium shank. G.T. Marsh & Co. was a San Francisco-based Asian art dealer known for their distinctive jewels. As a boy infatuated with Asian culture, George Turner Marsh apprenticed with a Japanese tea merchant, remaining there alone while his Australian family continued on to San Francisco, where they settled. Young George used his time in Yokohama to become conversant in Japanese art and aesthetics, and after re-joining his family, established an Asian art gallery using the expertise he had acquired. During the 1930s, 40s and 50s, his family began designing jewelry based on their interpretation of masterful Japanese metalwork together with the favored gems of the region, jadeite, coral and pearls. The firm''s unique steel jewelry was produced by bluing and sandblasting techniques, which gave the metal its matte finish, an extraordinary base for its sparkling, gleaming gems.

Marsh Mid-20th Century Patinated Steel, Palladium, Pearl and Diamond Ring

"Flower Form" Glass Vase by Tiffany

An American Art Nouveau Favrile glass "Flower Form" vase by Tiffany Studios New York. The upper portion of the vase is ornamented with green pulled feather decoration, imitative of leaves, against a graduated iridescent gold and rose colored ground and sits atop a translucent green stem that extends upwards from an iridescent gold foot. Favrile is the trade name Tiffany gave to his blown art glass. The name derives from the Latin word fabrilis, meaning "made by hand." The technique was developed at Tiffany Furnaces in the mid-1890s using filaments from batches of differently colored glass and working the material while the glass was still molten. Ornamentation was added before the piece had its final shape, so that the decoration became fully integrated into the vessel. Favrile glass vases in the shapes of stylized flowers were among the earliest creations of the Tiffany Glass and Decorating Company, forerunner of Tiffany Studios. Initial examples of this technique date from approximately 1894, although later pieces show greater refinement. Flower forms have great variety in stem length and rim shape.

'Flower Form' Glass Vase by Tiffany

French Art Nouveau Chair by Gauthier

A French Art Nouveau upholstered chair by Gauthier. The chair''s back and legs are gracefully carved, and the ornament in relief beneath the seat is repeated as carving in the chair back. The chair is upholstered in a leafy green fabric.

French Art Nouveau Chair by Gauthier

Marzo Paris Art Deco Lapis Lazuli and Gold Flexible Bracelet

A French Art Deco 18 karat gold bracelet with lapis lazuli by Marzo Paris. The flexible bracelet has 19 lapis lazuli gold-set beads which form the central row between outer rows of polished gold beads.

Marzo Paris Art Deco Lapis Lazuli and Gold Flexible Bracelet

French Art Nouveau Wooden Armchair by Edouard Colonna

A French Art Nouveau armchair, by Edouard Colonna, in carved mahogany with green upholstery. A similar chair is pictured in "The Paris Salons, 1895-1910, Volume III: Furniture," by Alastair Duncan, Antique Collectors'' Club, Publishers, page 108.

French Art Nouveau Wooden Armchair by Edouard Colonna

Bronze Portrait of Sarah Bernhardt by Paul François Berthoud

A French Art Nouveau gilt and patinated bronze portrait of Sarah Bernhardt by Paul François Berthoud. Sarah Bernhardt was the most important dramatic actress of the 19th century. She is portrayed here with a jeweled sash and flowing hair, no doubt a reference to her role as Gismonda in the play by Victorien Sardou. A sculpture belonging to this series is in the collection of the French National Museum.

Bronze Portrait of Sarah Bernhardt by Paul François Berthoud

French Art Nouveau "Cephataria" server by Louis Majorelle

A French Art Nouveau French walnut server by Louis Majorelle in the "Cephataria" motif. The server has two drawers with gilt-bronze handles in a leaf motif, double door storage below and is elaborately carved throughout in a floral motif. Similar pieces are pictured in the 1906 Majorelle catalogue (see Salle à Manger "Céphataria").

French Art Nouveau 'Cephataria' server by Louis Majorelle

Tiffany Studios New York Art "Peacock Eye" Glass Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York Art Nouveau "Peacock Eye" glass vase by Louis Comfort Tiffany. Decorated with blue peacock eye feathers on an iridescent blue and green ground.

Tiffany Studios New York Art 'Peacock Eye' Glass Vase

Art Nouveau "Crabe" vide-poche by Amalric Walter

A French "Crabe" pâte de verre vide-poche by Amalric Walter. The reddish-brown crab has spots of dark green, red and yellow on the top portion of its shell. It sits on a green wave with long strands of seaweed. A similar vide-poche is pictured in: Amalric Walter (1870-1959), by Keith Cummings, Kingswinford: Broadfield House Glass Museum, 2006, p. 18, cat. no. 15.

Art Nouveau 'Crabe' vide-poche by Amalric Walter

"Tale of Genji" Commode by Émile Gallé

A French Art Nouveau marquetry commode by Émile Gallé. With original key. The syncretic influence of Japanese art is keenly felt in Gallé''s commode. The beginning of Galle''s fascination with Japanese art can be traced back to his friendship with Hokkai Takashima (1850-1931), a fellow botanist and member of the École de Nancy. Their botanical dialogue was facilitated by the Shokobutsu mei-i, a book of Japanese names for botanical species. It is from Hokkai that Gallé gained a spiritual and symbolic understanding of nature. Along with other École de Nancy artists, Hokkai and Gallé exhibited together in the display window of René Wiener''s papeterie. The store served as the office of Wiener''s arts journal, the Nancy artiste, which regularly featured on its covers contemporary examples of Gansai (Japanese watercolor), Byobu (folding screens) from the Rinpa school, Sumi-e (ink painting), and Ukiyo-e (woodblock prints). As a show of gratitude, Hokkai bequeathed a vast art book collection to Wiener. It is from this record that we know with certainty of which Japanese artists Gallé had knowledge. One of the books in Hokkai''s collection was Hokusai''s Les cent paysages du Fuji (Fugaku hyakkei.) This 1835 expansion of Hokusai''s 36 views of Mount Fuji contained more elaborate iterations of his original compositions. The commode features two drawers and four cabriole legs. ... The front of the drawers features a marquetry panel with mountains, unkai (sea of clouds) and usugumo (wisps of clouds) motifs. It is likely from works like Hokusai''s Yama mata yama (Mountains Upon Mountains) that Gallé assimilated the unkai (??) motif. The Yama mata yama is the album''s only zenithal view, allowing this phenomenon which is normally only visible from high elevations. On the top of the commode, a sunset mirage overlooks the entire scene. Meanwhile in the foreground, Gallé has included a usugumo motif rendered in warm brown wood. The wisps of cloud motif originates in a stanza in the Tale of Genji in his mourning for Fujitsubo. Those thin wisps of cloud trailing there over Mountains caught in sunset light Seem to wish to match their hue To the sleeves of the bereaved. There is a distinct temporal quality in the commode''s composition. The left side panel depicts a diurne while the right side panel depicts a nocturne. The juxtaposition of day and night in Japanese ukiyo-e was a subject much beloved by Hokusai and Hiroshige and was termed chuya (chu meaning day and ya meaning night). The Japanese nocturne was clearly a subject of great fascination to Gallé as well as evidenced by his "Nuit Japonais" vase. A similar commode is pictured in: "Gallé Furniture", by Alastair Duncan and Georges de Bartha, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 2012, p. 329, plate 15.

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'Tale of Genji' Commode by Émile Gallé

French "Crabe" Pâte de Verre Vide Poche by Amalric Walter and Henri Bergé

A French "Crab" pâte de verre vide-poche by Amalric Walter and Henri Bergé. The reddish-brown crab, with spots of deep yellow and deep green on its back, sits atop a bed of kelp on an elongated green and yellow dish. A similar vide-poche is pictured in: Amalric Walter (1870-1959), by Keith Cummings, Kingswinford: Broadfield House Glass Museum, 2006, p. 25, cat. no .30.

French 'Crabe' Pâte de Verre Vide Poche by Amalric Walter and Henri Bergé

Boudoir Lamp by Edouard Colonna

A French Art Nouveau gilt bronze boudoir lamp by Edouard Colonna. The gilt bronze base has a foliate motif. The fringed pale gold silk shade is topped by a twisted vine finial that spreads in an arch over the lamp. A similar lamp is pictured in: "Art Nouveau: The French Aesthetic," by Victor Arwas, London: Andreas Papadakis, 2002, p. 281.

Boudoir Lamp by Edouard Colonna

Three Legged Mahogany Table attributed to Eugène Vallin

A French three legged mahogany table attributed to Eugène Vallin.

Three Legged Mahogany Table attributed to Eugène Vallin

"Langouste", pâte de verre paperweight by Walter and Bergé.

A French "Langouste" pâte de verre paperweight by Amalric Walter and Henri Bergé. The brown crayfish with red spots straddles a green and yellow curved base. A similar paperweight is pictured in: Amalric Walter (1870-1959), by Keith Cummings, Kingswinford: Broadfield House Glass Museum, 2006, p. 49, cat. no 77c.

'Langouste', pâte de verre paperweight by Walter and Bergé.

Tiffany & Co. Art Deco ''No Heat'' Ruby, Diamond and Platinum Ring

An Art Deco platinum ring with rubies and diamonds by Tiffany & Co. The ring centers on an emerald-cut ruby with an approximate weight of 1.10 carats, and 6 old European-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of .70 carat. The ring is designed in a highly graphic Art Deco motif. AGL report no. CS 72168, origin: Burma (Myanmar) origin, no indications of heat.

Tiffany & Co. Art Deco ''No Heat'' Ruby, Diamond and Platinum Ring

Gueridon Table by Louis Majorelle

A French Art Nouveau marble top guéridon by Louis Majorelle. The legs, apron and cross piece of this triangular table are carved with flowers, vines and leaves. Fashioned of marble and carved and molded mahogany, the Chevrefuille guéridon''s sophisticated and dynamic design is enhanced by the sinuous curves of its chevrefuille (honeysuckle) motif. In this piece, Majorelle breathes new life into old tradition.The tabletop is inset with the highest grade rosso di verona marble: white veined orange nodules set within a red matrix. The guéridon''s top, apron, legs and stretcher are carved with chevrefuille (honeysuckle) motif. The two words that make up chevrefoil, chevre (from chevreuil (roe deer)) and feuille (leaf), reveal the vine''s negative connotation within French culture. Chevreuil fauns putatively became intoxicated from the shoots of the chevrefeuille. The chevreuil was so named after the chevre (goat) due to its goat like head. The goat with its nineteenth century evocation of the occult and sexuality only added to the plant''s profanity. The Chevrefuille guéridon refers to Marie de France''s thirteenth century "Chevrefeuille", a French variation of the Tristan Legend. Majorelle had previously created furniture based on the flowers of the Tristan legend, but none so magnificently convey the essence of the story as this guéridon. With the ubiquity of Wagner''s Tri ... stan und Isolde in fin-de-siecle France, contemporary artistic circles would have easily understood the work''s iconography. Isolde had told Tristan that if a chevrefuille (honeysuckle vine) wraps itself around a branch of hazelwood (noisitier), the two could not be separated without killing them both. While lying in wait for Isolde, Tristan carves a line into a hazelwood branch and plants it along her courtly procession: "Belle amie, ainsi en est-il de nous: Ni vous sans moi, ni moi sans vous!" "Beautiful friend so it is with us: neither you without me, or me without you." After the lover''s commit suicide, a hazel entwined by a honeysuckle emerge from their grave despite King Mark''s attempt to exterminate them. Despite the illicit nature of the lover''s affair, the couple never consummate, thus maintaining Isolde''s virginity. The honeysuckle''s deforms the hazel tree, minimizing its utility. Through the form of the table and the honeysuckle''s iconographic meaning, Majorelle creates drama between the sacred and the profane. The form of the guéridon evokes the architecture of the gothic church, from the reuleaux shape of the tabletop to the y-shaped dome of the stretcher. The honeysuckle twists about the table without corrupting the table''s divine form, thereby creating the purity of the union in death. This message was communicated in "Liebestod", the climactic end of Tristan und Isolde that literally means love-death. A similar gueridon appears in "Majorelle - Nancy: décorations d''intérieurs: meubles, tentures, bronzes, ferronneries" (the 1906 Majorelle catalogue).

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Gueridon Table by Louis Majorelle

Tiffany Studios "Grapevine" Picture Frame

An Art Nouveau gilt bronze and glass "Grapevine" picture frame by Tiffany Studios New York with an oval aperture. A similar frame is pictured in: "Tiffany Desk Sets," by William R. Holland, Atglen, PA: Schiffer, 2008, p. 95, figure 3-39.

Tiffany Studios 'Grapevine' Picture Frame

"Chalmont" planter by Hector Guimard

A French ceramic planter, known as "Chalmont," by Hector Guimard . The planter features a blue interior with stylized handles with gold highlights. The exterior is glazed in dark brown. A similar planter is featured in: Philippe Guimard Thiébaut edition of the Réunion des Musées Nationaux, Paris, 1992. Model reproduced on pages 258 and 262.

'Chalmont' planter by Hector Guimard

Tiffany Studios "Pine Needle" Picture Frame

An Art Nouveau gilt bronze "Pine Needle" picture frame by Tiffany Studios New York. The frame is rectangular with an oval center display and decorated in gilt bronze over mottled amber glass. A similar frame is pictured in: "Tiffany Desk Sets," by William R. Holland, Atglen, PA: Schiffer, 2008, p. 63, fig. 2-44.

Tiffany Studios 'Pine Needle' Picture Frame

Floral Vase by Tiffany Studios New York

A Favrile flower form vase by Louis Comfort Tiffany. The vase is iridescent yellow, with hints of orange, and has a ruffled rim. Favrile glass vases in the shapes of stylized flowers were among the earliest creations of the Tiffany Glass and Decorating Company, forerunner of Tiffany Studios. Initial examples of this technique date from approximately 1894, although later pieces show greater refinement. Flower forms have great variety in stem length and rim shape. A similar vase is pictured in: "Tiffany at Auction," by Alastair Duncan, New York: Rizzoli, 1981, p. 24, cat. no. 44; "The Tiffany Collection of the Chrysler Museum at Norfolk," by Paul E. Doros, Richmond, VA: W. M. Brown & son, Inc., 1978, p. 32, cat. no. 26; "Louis Comfort Tiffany," by Jacob Baal-Teshuva, New York: Taschen, 2001, p. 260; "The Art Glass of Louis Comfort Tiffany," by Paul E. Doros, New York: The Vendome Press, 2013, p. 74, fig. 27.

Floral Vase by Tiffany Studios New York

French Art Nouveau Pedestal by Jacques Gruber

A French three tier sellette in walnut with floral motifs by Jacques Gruber. This gracefully carved round sellette has three curving legs.

French Art Nouveau Pedestal by Jacques Gruber

Tiffany & Co. Art Nouveau Gold Cuff Links

A pair of American Art Nouveau 18 karat gold cuff links by Tiffany & Co. The double sided cuff links are made in a curved rectangular shape with a dimensional concentric motif.

Tiffany & Co. Art Nouveau Gold Cuff Links

French Art Nouveau Chairs by Gauthier

A pair of French Art Nouveau upholstered chairs by Gauthier. The chairs have graceful carving on the backs and legs. They are upholstered in a green leafy fabric.

French Art Nouveau Chairs by Gauthier

German Art Nouveau Bronze Figural Vide-Poche by Bernhard Hoetger

A German Art Nouveau patinated bronze figural vide poche by Bernhard Hoetger featuring a windblown nude with floral vines climbing her leg and giving her some modesty. Pictured in: "Dynamic Beauty: Sculpture of Art Nouveau Paris", by Macklowe Gallery, The Studley Press, 2011, p. 146.

German Art Nouveau Bronze Figural Vide-Poche by Bernhard Hoetger

Bronze "Lily Pad" Mirror by Tiffany Studios

A Tiffany Studios New York patinated bronze "Lily Pad" dressing mirror with a lily pad base and twisted vine frame. Pictured in "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: an illustrated reference to over 2000 models" by Alastair Duncan, page 402, plate 1633, #899.

Bronze 'Lily Pad' Mirror by Tiffany Studios

Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase with Serpents by Ernest Leveillé

An Art Nouveau cameo glass vase by Ernest Leveillé for Escalier de Cristal, with two wheel carved red serpents in high relief intertwined around the outer surface. The background glass has a moss-like texture trapped within the vessel. The vase sits within a bronze mount at the bottom. The style of the background glass is the same as in many of his sophisticated pieces and the technique is the same as in many of his hand carved (wheel-carved) glass vases. The vase was retailed by Escalier de Cristal of Paris, one of the great proponents of Art Nouveau at the turn of the 20th century.

Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase with Serpents by Ernest Leveillé

French Art Nouveau Dragonfly Table by Émile Gallé.

A French Art Nouveau two tiered table by Émile Gallé. The table''s four legs are the carved bodies of dragonflies, their wings outstretched and frozen mid-flight. The table top rests on the dragonflies'' heads and wings, with a fluid curvature in the corners creating a crown for the winged creatures'' heads. Marquetry on the table top depicts flowers on long-leafed stems, with shadows of foliage in the background. Decoration in darker tones and larger, starker motifs, decorate the lower tier, playing on the shadows in which it is naturally shrouded. The dragonfly works of Gallé''s provoked very strong critical reaction when they were debuted in 1900, with champions of Art Nouveau lauding the modernity of the dragonfly as caryatid, while detractors were horrified by the very idea of insects as table legs. Time has certainly found favor with this design, as it has found pride of place in museum collections worldwide. A similar table is pictured in: "Gallé Furniture," by Alastair Duncan and Georges de Bartha, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 2012, p. 207, plate 192a.

French Art Nouveau Dragonfly Table by Émile Gallé.

Spanish Art Nouveau Armchairs by Joan Busquets

A pair of Spanish Art Nouveau armchairs with giltwood frames by Joan Busquets. Made for Antonio Gaudi''s Palacio Güell, Barcelona, Joan Busquets crafted much of Gaudi''s furniture. A member of a family that was long involved in the design and manufacture of furniture in Spain, Joan Busquests was a proponent of Art Nouveau and modernism at the turn of the 20th century Spain. Most often associated with the architect and designer Antonio Gaudi and the movement specific to the Catalan region of Barcelona, Busquets''s designs encompass a broader range of European Art Nouveau, particularly those of France and Belgium. His furniture is often reduced in scale, embodies the rococo in an inventive way and uses gilding to enhance and lightened design, as well as to serve as a reflective element. This chair model looks identical to a suite of furniture designed in collaboration with Antonio Gaudi for the Güell Palace, Barcelona that is pictured in situ in a photograph from the palace. These chairs appear to be identical to those pictured. From 1840 on, Joan Busquets produced furniture for numerous distinguished clients in Barcelona, and also supplied the aristocracy in Madrid, Cuba, Puerto Rico and the republics of Central and South America. The leitmotiv of Busquets''s firm was the golden sunflower with sinuous stem (to which must be added other motifs based on flora and fauna, suc ... h as lilies, orchids and snails), evident in his furniture designs. Provenance: Pedro Uhart, Paris Allan Stone Gallery, New York (acquired from the above ca. 1986) Exhibited: New York, Allan Stone Gallery, Furniture by Gaudi and Busquets, September 9 - November 26, 1996. New York, Allan Stone Gallery, Nouveau to Modern: Transitions in Art and Design, January 16-March 2, 2013.

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Spanish Art Nouveau Armchairs by Joan Busquets

Loïe Fuller" Lithograph by Orazi

A French "Théâtre de Loïe Fuller" lithograph by Manuel Orazi. The poster depicts the dancer Loïe Fuller with flowing red hair and her signature billowing costume, surrounded by stylized flowers. Realistically-drawn flowers descend from the poster title. The artist''s insignia appears on the lower right of the image. A similar poster is pictured in:" Loïe Fuller: Magician of Light," Exhibition at the Virginia Museum, March 12-April 22, 1979, Richmond: The Virginia Museum, 1979, p. 76; and in: "The Kogod Collection," E. Greenwich, RI: Meridian Printing, 2004, p. 242.

 Loïe Fuller' Lithograph by Orazi

French Art Nouveau Vitrine by Emile Gallé

A French Art Nouveau "le cerisier" (cherry tree) vitrine by Emile Gallé featuring marquetry and carving throughout with original stylized fleur-de-lys brass shelf rests and a key with floral decoration. The mirrored vitrine backing enables one to view the backside of the collection housed within. This unusual piece was originally electrified when manufactured. The beginning of Gallé''s fascination with Japanese art can be traced back to his friendship with Hokkai Takashima (1850-1931), a Japanese nobleman, fellow botanist and member of the École de Nancy. Takashima introduced Gallé to a mesmerizing world of Japanese woodblock prints and textile designs, which he frequently incorporated into his work. Gallé''s early success at the 1900 Paris Exposition Universelle was with his "Japonisante" vitrine, a piece that featured "cherry blossom" openwork. In Gallé''s personal life, the cherry blossom held sentimental value, reminding him of his trips to Saillon, Switzerland. In his journal, Gallé mused "the cherries ripen in the snow falling from the dandelions." The gentle dark wood ripples in the marquetry evoke alpine mist and clouds taking the viewer to this enchanting scene. A similar vitrine is pictured in: "Gallé Furniture," by Alastair Duncan and Georges de Bartha, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 2012, p. 295, plate 17.

French Art Nouveau Vitrine by Emile Gallé

Art Deco Diamond and Emerald Necklace

An Art Deco platinum necklace with emeralds, diamonds and enamel. The necklace has five fluted emerald beads with an approximate total weight of 19.00 carats, accented with 124 baguettes, 10 triangular and 302 round old European-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of 11.10 carats, G/H/I color, VS clarity. Each graduated emerald bead is flanked by black enamel accents, with the back chain set in an Art Deco baguette and round diamond motif.

Art Deco Diamond and Emerald Necklace

A French Art Nouveau Wooden Pedestal by Emile Gallé

A French Art Nouveau two-tiered square pedestal with carved and marquetry decoration by Emile Gallé. The pedestal has two marquetry shelves depicting leaves. Its four sinuous legs are enhanced with carved arch supports. A similar selette is pictured in: "Gallé Furniture," by Alastair Duncan and Georges de Bartha, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 2012, p. 253, plate 18.

A French Art Nouveau Wooden Pedestal by Emile Gallé

French Art Nouveau silver and plique-à-jour enamel coupe d''ornement by Eugène Feuillâtre

A French Art Nouveau silver and plique-à-jour enamel coupe d''ornement by Eugène Feuillâtre. This exceptional compote features delicate and stylized floral patterns on the upper and lower portions. Green leaves encircle the base of the piece and the sinewy stem of the petite cup appears to grow out of the foliage below, and a spray of pink flowers blooms at the top of the compote. Feuillâtre complimented the deeply rooted organic motifs of his quintessentially Art Nouveau compote by adorning the piece with small green enamel buds on the top and bottom of the stem. This compote is particularly remarkable because it is made almost entirely of plique-à-jour enamel. Eugene Feuillâtre (1870-1916) was a sculptor, enamelist, silversmith and jeweler. He worked for Lalique at the end of the 19th century and established his own firm in 1899, specializing in plique-à-jour decorated objects. He also perfected the technique of enameling on silver and platinum. Provenance: the Collection of Joseph R. Ritman. A nearly identical coupe d''ornement resides in the Musee D''Orsay in Paris.

French Art Nouveau silver and plique-à-jour enamel coupe d''ornement by Eugène Feuillâtre

Tiffany Studios New York "Cypriote" Glass Vase

An Art Nouveau "Cypriote" glass vase by Tiffany Studios New York. The vase has iridescent gold over a brown base. The iridescence includes hints of pinks and blues. Provenance: PROPERTY OF DR. JEROME AND MRS. GAYLE LANDY Cypriote is a textured glass achieved at Tiffany Glass and Decorating Company by rolling glass over a marble or iron surface covered with pulverized bits of the same glass. Its iridescence and bubbles resembled the decomposed surface of Roman glass discovered during archeological explorations on the island of Cyprus, hence its name. A similar vase is pictured in: "The Art Glass of Louis Comfort Tiffany," by Paul E. Doros, New York: The Vendome Press, 2013, p. 108.

Tiffany Studios New York 'Cypriote' Glass Vase

Tiffany Studios New York Glass "Gooseneck" Sprinkler Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York Favrile glass rose water sprinkler vase. This "gooseneck" design is considered one of Tiffany''s most original and delicate forms. A similar sprinkler is pictured in: "Tiffany Favrile Art Glass," by Moise S. Steeg, Jr., Atglen, PA: Schiffer Publishing, Ltd., 1997, p. 33; and in: "Tiffany at Auction," by Alastair Duncan, New York: Rizzoli, 1981, p. 19, cat. no. 27.

Tiffany Studios New York Glass 'Gooseneck' Sprinkler Vase

Cypriote vase by Tiffany Studios New York

A silver colored Cypriote vase by Tiffany Studios New York. The body of the vase is subtly ribbed. The ribs extend into the vase''s neck, where they are more pronounced. Cypriote is a textured glass achieved at Tiffany Glass and Decorating Company by rolling glass over a marble or iron surface covered with pulverized bits of the same glass. Its iridescence and bubbles resembled the decomposed surface of Roman glass discovered during archeological explorations on the island of Cyprus, hence its name. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in:" Timeless Beauty: The Art of Louis Comfort Tiffany," Atglen, PA: Schiffer Publishing, 2016, p. 66.

Cypriote vase by Tiffany Studios New York

Tiffany Studios New York American "Lava" Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York American Art Nouveau "Lava" vase by Louis Comfort Tiffany. A visit to Mount Etna in Sicily during one of its eruptions is said to have inspired Tiffany to capture in glass the force and beauty of the molten volcanic flows and basaltic rock formations that he observed there. The free-form abstract drippings of gold molten glass and the speckled blue and gold ground recreate the naturalistic effects of flowing lava and make this vase an exceptional example of the form. Provenance: The Garden Museum Collection, Matsue, Japan and Important Art Nouveau from the Private Collection of Lloyd & Barbara Macklowe at Sotheby''s 1995 This vase is pictured in: "A Selection of 300 Works From Louis C. Tiffany Garden Museum," by Takeo Horiuchi, Japan: Greco Corporation Fine Art Department, 2001, p. 250. A similar piece is also in the collection of the Chrysler Museum in Norfolk, VA: "The Tiffany Collection of the Chrysler Museum at Norfolk," by Paul E. Doros, Richmond, VA: W. M. Brown & son, Inc., 1978, p. 70, plate 69. Also pictured in "Tiffany Favrile Glass and the Quest of Beauty," by Martin Eidelberg, page 29, plate 28.

Tiffany Studios New York American 'Lava' Vase

"Winter Scene" Glass Vase by Daum.

A French Art Nouveau "Winter Scene" cameo glass vase by Daum Nancy. A group of bare trees in the foreground sit on snowy ground under a yellow and orange sky. A larger group of bare trees are in the background. PROVENANCE: From an Unreserved Texas Estate. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: Daum Frères: Maîtres Verriers, 1892-1935, by Katharina Büttiker-Weber, Zurich: Galerie Katharina Büttiker, 1986, cat. no 27.

'Winter Scene' Glass Vase by Daum.

Georges Fouquet French Art Nouveau Opal and Silver Peacock Cloak Clasp

A French Art Nouveau silver cloak clasp with opals by Georges Fouquet. The cape clasp is decorated with 14 bezel-set crystal opal plaques. The clasp is designed as two intertwined peacocks with extravagant whiplash ''feathers''. Inspired by a noted collaboration with the renowned Art Nouveau innovator Alfonse Mucha, this cloak clasp in all its exquisite detail and voluptuous lines perfectly encapsulates the spirit of the period. Its peacock theme was a favorite motif of Fouquet and Mucha. A similar piece is pictured in Alastair Duncan''s, The Paris Salons, 1895-1914: Volume I, Antique Collectors'' Club, Woodbridge, Suffolk, 1994, page 251.

Georges Fouquet French Art Nouveau Opal and Silver Peacock Cloak Clasp

French Art Nouveau Bronze Sculpture by Carabin

A French Art Nouveau bronze sculpture of a castanet dancer in motion with flowing gown by Rupert Carabin. This barefoot woman holds her castanets out in front of her. Carabin made a number of sculptures of dancers in different poses.

French Art Nouveau Bronze Sculpture by Carabin

"Chalmont" planter by Hector Guimard

A French Art Nouveau green ceramic planter known, as "Chalmont," by Hector Guimard. The planter features a blue interior with stylized gold-highlighted handles. A similar planter is featured in: Philippe Guimard Thiébaut edition of the Réunion des Musées Nationaux, Paris, 1992. Model reproduced on pages 258 and 262.

'Chalmont' planter by Hector Guimard

French Art Nouveau Walnut Vitrine

A French Art Nouveau walnut vitrine in ash and rosewood, featuring clemantis depicted in marquetry and deep carving. The vitrine has two lockable storage areas, each with a shelf, and two drawers that swing out from the body. There is also a shelf in the glass-fronted area near the top of the piece. The vitrine''s three legs are decorated with carved roots.

French Art Nouveau Walnut Vitrine

"Aux Nénuphars" Two-Tier Table by Majorelle

Table Aux Nénuphars – A French Art Nouveau two-tier mahogany, tamarind wood and gilt bronze table by Louis Majorelle in the "water lily" motif, featuring applied bronze lily pad and vine decoration. The organic shape and rounded dip in each of the table''s two tiered planes mimics the appearance of a water lily suspended in water, creating a beautiful cohesion in the design. Known as the master furniture maker of the Art Nouveau style, Louis Majorelle was the recipient of the Grand Prize at the St. Louis World''s Fair, and international acclaim at the Paris Exposition Universelle of 1900. He remains among the most sought after designers of the early 20th century, and the most celebrated of the Nancy Art Nouveau artists. Those works by Majorelle that feature gilt bronze accents, produced by his team of highly skilled craftsman with the utmost attention to detail, are considered the most exceptional of the artist''s oeuvre, and are among the most collectible. A similar table is pictured in: "The Paris Salons 1895-1915, Vol. III: Furniture", by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1996, p. 382, and in: "Majorelle - Nancy: décorations d''intérieurs: meubles, tentures, bronzes, ferronneries" (the 1906 Majorelle catalogue) -- see Cabinet de Travail "Nénuphars".

 'Aux Nénuphars' Two-Tier Table by Majorelle

French Art Nouveau "Winter Landscape" Vase by Daum Nancy

A French Art Nouveau "Winter Landscape" vase with an inverted lip, by Daum Nancy. The etched and enameled glass vase depicts trees in a barren meadow, a forested background against an amber and orange sky. PROVENANCE: From an Unreserved Texas Estate. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: Daum Frères: Maîtres Verriers, 1892-1935, by Katharina Büttiker-Weber, Zurich: Galerie Katharina Büttiker, 1986, cat. no 27.

French Art Nouveau 'Winter Landscape' Vase by Daum Nancy

French Art Nouveau Vitrine by Emile Gallé

A French carved and fruitwood marquetry inlaid Ombelliféres vitrine by Emile Gallé. The vitrine has marquetry ombelle flowers in its interior and on the panel below the bottom shelf. The interior has two small carved half shelves. The top and bottom have elaborately carved ombelle decorations. It sits on four sinuously carved feet. The vitrine''s front marquetry panel features three Berce des prés composed in a similar manner to Kitao Shigemasa''s Tree peony and Finch. Through Takashima Hokkai, Gallé was able to borrow a copy of Fleurs, oiseaux par Shigemasa (Kachoe shashin zue). Like Shigemasa, Gallé worked in the aesthetic of kacho-e (birds and flower painting) with a thorough understanding of the grammar of ikebana (flower arrangement). Gallé''s expertise was so great that he was entrusted with organizing an ikebana retrospective for the 1900 Exposition Universelle. Ikebana is composed of three elements: shin (heaven, sun, male), soe (earth, female), and hikae/tai (humanity, child.) Gallé has arranged his flowers according to the Moribana school, a style of ikebana that came at the apex of the Meiji restoration. Shigemasa had his peonies according to Moribana principles: the right most "soe" flower leans at 45°, the middle "shin" flower at 10° and the leftmost "hikae" flower at 75°. Pivotal to ikebana is the principles of harmony and balance. It is the function of the 4 ... 5° soe flower through angle to balance out the 75° hikae flower. While Gallé did not follow the rigid rules of Moribana, this should not be seen as an indication of inferiority. Rather, Gallé has merely solved the problem of balance in a different manner. While Shigemasa created a sense of balance through angle, Gallé made rendered the leftmost flower in madagascar ebony . The dark value serves as a visual weight, balancing an arrangement that otherwise approaches imbalance. Next to the Berce des prés is an Écaille martre (Tiger moth.) Native to the same prairies as the Berce des prés, the inclusion of the Écaille martre gives the vitrine the crepuscular setting that Gallé loved so much. Literature: Alastair Duncan and Georges de Bartha, "Gallé Furniture," Woodbridge, Antique Collector''s Club, 2012, p. 307, pl.42, for a similar example.

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French Art Nouveau Vitrine by Emile Gallé

A French Art Nouveau Marquetry Vase by Émile Gallé

A French Art Nouveau marquetry vase by Émile Gallé. The vase features crocus flowers in hues of orange and purple against a cream ground with stripes in pink and red. The vase is accented with an applied band of tendrils backed by silver foil inclusions. A similar vase is pictured in: Émile Gallé et le Verre, la Collection du musée de l''École de Nancy, Parks: Somogy editions d''art, 2004, p. 137, ca. not. 222.

A French Art Nouveau Marquetry Vase by Émile Gallé

Tiffany Morning Glory Paperweight Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York "Paperweight" vase by Louis Comfort Tiffany. A major innovation in Tiffany''s work around 1900 involved the encasement of hot glass with an additional transparent layer--a technique associated with paperweights. The added layer of clear glass produced a three-dimensional effect, as though the plants existed in a lower level, beneath the surface. Most of Tiffany''s early "Paperweight" vases had a clear body with a gold iridescent core, adding to the poetic effect. This particular vase displays purple and white cream morning glories with green veined leaves and stems against an iridescent translucent light green hued ground. The difficulty of creating naturalistic imagery in hot glass should not be underestimated. The detailed representation of the morning glory blossoms with their star-like markings makes this vase highly desirable. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: "Louis C. Tiffany: Artist for the Ages," by Marilynn A. Johnson, London: Scala Publishers, Ltd., 2005, p. 150, ca. not. 56; "The Art Glass of Louis Comfort Tiffany", by Paul E. Doros, New York: The Vendome Press, 2013, p. 140, fig. 89; and in: "Louis Comfort Tiffany at Tiffany & Co.," by John Loring, New York: Harry N. Abrams, Inc., 2002, page 163.

Tiffany Morning Glory Paperweight Vase

French Art Nouveau Glass Vase by Émile Gallé,

A French Art Nouveau carved cameo glass vase by Émile Gallé, decorated with oak leaves and a staghorn beetle.. On a background that changes gradually from pale yellow to pale orange, a brown staghorn beetle climbs a brown branch toward green leaves. A similar vase is pictured in: Émile Gallé, by Philippe Garner, London: Academy Editions, 1976, p. 112.

French Art Nouveau Glass Vase by Émile Gallé,

Art Deco Pearl, Mother of Pearl, Platinum over Gold Cuff Links by Carrington & Company

A pair of American Art Deco 14 karat gold and platinum cuff links with mother of pearl and pearl by Carrington & Company. The cuff links are made of mother of pearl disks with a 2mm cultured pearl set in the center framed in engine turned platinum. Double-sided. Made by Carrington & Company, Newark, NJ. Four Swank dress studs are included in this set.

Art Deco Pearl, Mother of Pearl, Platinum over Gold Cuff Links by Carrington & Company

French Art Nouveau Triangular Table by Louis Majorelle

A triangular French Art Nouveau table by Louis Majorelle. This two-tiered triangular table is made of mahogany. Its carved legs are finished with bronze sabots. A similar table is pictured in: "The Paris Salons 1895-1915, Vol. III: Furniture," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1996, p. 413 (Pedestals, La Société des Artistes Décoratuers, 1910).

French Art Nouveau Triangular Table by Louis Majorelle

French Art Nouveau Table by Louis Majorelle

A French Art Nouveau table by Louis Majorelle. This two-tiered mahogany table is carved with vegetal forms and flowers. The three legs are also carved, and the top is composed of beautifully grained wood.

French Art Nouveau Table by Louis Majorelle

Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

A French Art Nouveau cameo glass vase by Daum, featuring a scene of red blooming flowers on an opaque white martelé ground. The flowers, which have dark centers, are suspended from dark curving stems that emerge from dark green carved leaves. Pictured in Glass, Art Nouveau to Art Deco, by Victor Arwass, page 83. Art Nouveau, the French Aesthetic,by Victor Arwas, page 506.

Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

French Armchairs by Louis Majorelle

A pair of French Art Nouveau "Pommes de Pin" armchairs by Louis Majorelle. Similar armchairs are pictured in: "Majorelle - Nancy: décorations d''intérieurs: meubles, tentures, bronzes, ferronnerie"s (the 1906 Majorelle catalogue) (Salon "Pommes de Pins").

French Armchairs by Louis Majorelle

English Victorian silver-plated suite by Elkington & Co.

A suite of three English Victorian silver-plated objects by Elkington & Co. The suite comprises a pair of four-light candelabra and an epergne. Each candelabrum is decorated with three sphinxes that sit atop a splayed paw-footed platform. The stem and arms are adorned with a classic foliage decoration. The epergne is ornately decorated and accented with enamel work surrounding the "Three Graces;" daughters of Zeus who were said to represent youth, beauty, mirth and elegance. The graces presided over banquets and gatherings, to delight the guests of the gods. Elkington & Co. was founded by George Richards Elkington and his brother Henry Elkington in the 1830''s. The company, over the years, was very successful and known to be a prime producer of silver-plated objects. Elkington received various royal warrants of appointments including an appointment from the emperor of Austria.

English Victorian silver-plated suite by Elkington & Co.

Gauthier & Poinsignon French Settee

A French settee by Camille Gauthier & Paul Poinsignon. The settee in mahogany has carved stylized flowers on the back, arms and below the seat. Upholstered in green fabric.

Gauthier & Poinsignon French Settee

"Irises" French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Burgun & Schverer

A French Art Nouveau "Irises" cameo glass vase by Burgun & Schverer with intercalaire decoration of lavender irises with green stems on a carved brilliant rose colored ground.

'Irises' French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Burgun & Schverer

Van Cleef & Arpels Paris Late-20th Century Diamond Sapphire and Platinum ''Camilia'' Earrings

A pair of Mid-20th Century platinum "Camélia" earrings with diamonds and blue sapphires by Van Cleef & Arpels. The camellia flower earrings set with 36 sapphires, approximate total weight of 3.60 carats, and 86 round diamonds with an approximate total weight of 3.90 carats, F-G color, VVS-VS clarity. Made in France, sold at Van Cleef & Arpels, New York. These striking flower earrings with highly three dimensional shaping are a modern interpretation of the iconic Asian flower which had so captured the European imagination in the 20th century, According to Évelyne Possémé, head curator at the Musée des Arts Decoratifs, Paris, "At the same time as the Indian influence, a rather more classical vein was still found in earrings such as the Camellia clips, leaves composed of bead and prong-set rubies (and sapphires) and diamonds," Earclips of the same design as these, with rubies and diamonds, are pictured in Van Cleef & Arpels: L''Art De La Haute Joaillerie, by Évelyne Possémé, Les Arts Decoratifs, 2013, page 187.

Van Cleef & Arpels Paris Late-20th Century Diamond Sapphire and Platinum ''Camilia'' Earrings

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass by Émile Gallé

A French Art Nouveau cameo glass vase by Émile Gallé. The carved blooming flowers are painted in reds and whites, with green accents. Some of the carved stems are also painted, in reds and greens.

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass by Émile Gallé

Pair of French Gauthier & Poinsignon Side Chairs

A pair of French side chairs in mahogany by Camille Gauthier & Paul Poinsignon. The chairs have carved stylized flowers on their backs, arms and below the seats. They are upholstered in green fabric.

Pair of French Gauthier & Poinsignon Side Chairs

"Eighteen-Light Lily" Tiffany Lamp

A Tiffany Studios New York Favrile glass and patinated bronze "Eighteen-light Lily" lamp with 18 golden iridescent glass "Lily" shades suspended over a patinated bronze "Lily Pad" base. Tiffany took this model to the Paris and Turin World''s Fairs around the turn of the century, where the American lamp made waves in the French Art Nouveau movement. Praised for its elegance, the Tiffany "Lily" has been called the "Aristocrat of the Garden." This particular lamp is of special historical importance, even compared with other models of the same design, because it is one of the earliest examples of the "Eighteen-Light Lily." It is outfitted with shades of particular delicacy and iridescence that would have accommodated the weak light from the then newly-invented light bulbs. The shades are mounted on slender curving stems that grow out of a base in the shape of water lily flowers and pads. A similar lamp is pictured in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988, p. 80, plate 313.

'Eighteen-Light Lily' Tiffany Lamp

Armchair by Louis Majorelle

A French armchair by Louis Majorelle. This gracefully-proportioned chair has simple linear carvings on its legs. It is upholstered in green velour. A similar chair is pictured in: "The Paris Salons 1895-1915, Vol. III: Furniture," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1996, p. 396.

Armchair by Louis Majorelle

French Art Deco Diamond, Ruby, and Platinum Dove Brooch

A French Art Deco platinum and enamel brooch with diamonds and rubies. The brooch has 306 round diamonds with an approximate total weight of 8.75 carats, and 2 cabochon ruby accents. This dimensional brooch representing a dove, the symbol of peace and love, is of special significance, as it was produced as France and the European continent were heading towards war.

French Art Deco Diamond, Ruby, and Platinum Dove Brooch

French Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

A French cameo glass vase by Daum. The vase, with martelé background, has red wheel-carved lily flowers rising on green stems from its carved green base. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: Daum Nancy III: Daum Frères – Verreries de Nancy, 1880-1930, by Katharina Büttiker, Zurich: Galerie Katharina Büttiker, 2009, pp. 52-53.

French Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

Tiffany Studios Scarab and Mosaic Box

A Tiffany Studios New York "Scarab" mosaic and gilt bronze covered box by Louis Comfort Tiffany. This round box is decorated with vivid mosaics of red, yellow, orange, green, turquoise blue and black. The cover has three applied favrile glass scarab beetles. The scarabs confirm Tiffany''s fascination for Egyptian archeological discoveries and are a fine expression of his inspiration. Louis Comfort Tiffany first traveled to Egypt in 1872, two years after the opening of the Suez Canal and near the height of the ensuing American "Eyptomania." Tiffany was immediately taken with the ancient cultural legacies and starkly exotic landscape of 19th Century Egypt, and upon his return to New York he devoted himself to the rendering of several large scale oil paintings depicting the landscape, ancient wonders and then modern architecture of Cairo and the surrounding area. From that point onward the aesthetic language of ancient Egypt was never far from Tiffany''s mind, and it would appear in various motif forms in various works for the rest of his artistic career. Those works that demonstrate Tiffany''s great passion and careful study of ancient Egypt are now considered among the rarest and most collectible of his oeuvre. After a second Nile River Cruise in 1908 Tiffany resolved to celebrate his long enchantment with all things Egyptian with a Fete that would be written about for d ... ecades to come. Invitations to the strictly Egyptian-themed evening were on aged parchment in both hieroglyphs and English, and hand delivered to each of the bash''s 400 guests. Each of the attendees had to submit their costumes to astrict guidelines of authenticity overseen by a committee comprised of Egyptologists and authorities on costume art. Egyptian-inspired music, composed by Theodore Steinway, was performed by the New York Philharmonic Orchestra as Pedro de Cordoba, playing Marc Antony, brought gifts of Favrile glass to a posing Cleopatra. Tiffany''s sons-in-law were dressed as Roman lictors, while his daughters were adorned with rare scarab objects from Tiffany''s personal collection, fashioned as jewelry. Robert De Forest, the famed president of the Metropolitan Museum of American Art, arrived as the Maharaj of Punjab; John D. Rockefeller attended dressed as a pharaoh and Egyptian beauty queens wearing gigantic scarab wings served them North African fare. Tiffany spared no detail and no expense to recreate the opulence of ancient Egyptian courts, and created many decorative arts especially for the occasion. Tiffany was particularly interested in the importance of the scarab beetle in Egyptian mythology, and sparingly employed decorative depictions of the insect in his works, most probably due to his understanding of the supreme and sacred nature of the motif. However, those works that did include scarabs executed in the ancient Egyptian style are considered of special personal importance to Tiffany, and are especially important to find in Tiffany collections. The Egyptian name for the beetle is derived from the verb "to be created" or "to come into the world." The Egyptians considered the beetle to be the incarnation of the creator god, who had regenerated himself cyclically. The beetle was thus understood as a potent symbol of rebirth, and was tied to understandings of the daily rising sun.

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Tiffany Studios Scarab and Mosaic Box

"La Fée" Bronze Sculpture by Louis Chalon

A French Art Nouveau "Fairy" or "La Fée" bronze sculpture by Louis Chalon. A nude female figure stands on an open flower with complex, textured roots. On her back are four "wings" in the shape of orchid leaves. An orchid petal rises from the back of her head. Signed in base of sculpture. The base of the sculpture is marble. A similar sculpture is pictured in: "Dynamic Beauty: Sculpture of Art Nouveau Paris," by Macklowe Gallery, The Studley Press, 2011, p. 106.

'La Fée' Bronze Sculpture by Louis Chalon

Pair of French Art Nouveau Lithographs, "Dawn and Dusk", by Alphonse Mucha

A pair of French Art Nouveau lithographs, "Dawn and Dusk," by Alphonse Mucha. These two panels, both representing reclining female figures, are among the few horizontal formats produced by Mucha. These two ladies represent the terminal points of the sun''s daily journey. Dawn is represented by a girl removing the coverlet from her nude torso as she looks towards the rising sun. Dusk is a somnolent beauty settling down in her bed under the last rays of the day. Some of the most delicate pastel shadings are used by Mucha to differentiate one from the other. Pictured in: "Alphonse Mucha, The Complete Posters and Panels", by Jack Rennert and Alain Weill, G. K. Hall, 1984, page 258-259, plate 70.