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"Renaissance"

Antique 18 karat Gold, Enamel and Lapis Lazuli Cross

An Antique 18 karat gold and enamel pendant cross. The pendant cross is designed in a Renaissance Revival style, intricately enameled and backed with a composite with inlaid gold. Hair locket. Inscribed "HAC" and "Obit July 6th, 1877".

Antique 18 karat Gold, Enamel and Lapis Lazuli Cross

Marcus & Co. Art Nouveau 18kt Gold Black Opal and Enamel Stick Pin

This miniature representation of Renaissance Revival within the Art Nouveau period is set with a square black opal cabochon whose indigo and brilliant green swathes of color are echoed in its glowing enamel surround, highlighted by fleur-de-lis and scrolls. It would make a superb addition to any gentleman''s stick pin collection, or a glamorous gift for a showjumping or hunting equestrian to use as a stock tie pin. The multi-generational New York firm of Marcus & Co was founded by an ambitious young German immigrant who had trained with a prominent court jeweler in Dresden. In 1892, after working with Charles Lewis Tiffany, Hermann Marcus and his sons William and George together set up a business that soon became a glittering New York society institution renowned not only for its superb diamonds, colored stones and pearls, but also its instantly recognizable, original design style. The firm produced great jewels in the Art Nouveau and Arts & Crafts sensibility, with George, the artist/designer, drawing inspiration from sources as diverse as the contemporary French masters, the Moghuls and Maharajahs, the garland style of the Ancien Regime, and the genius of Renaissance goldsmiths. George''s distinctive, confident hand was always discernible in Marcus creations. Working as a team with George, William was a gem and pearl connoisseur who travelled the world hunting for exceptiona ... l gem material, including purchasing the entire production of never-before-seen black opal from Lightning Ridge Australia in 1908. Marcus exhibited at the 1900 Exposition Universelle in Paris, and their work won prizes from the prestigious Society of Arts & Crafts of Boston. Plique-à-jour enamel was an art in which the firm excelled. Displaying a mastery equal to that of the French artists, they created jewels with unprecedented three-dimensional depth in this medium. The firm and family were well-known for their charitable activities and promotion of young jewelers such as Raymond Yard. The firm''s jewelry is a focus of the collection of the American Wing at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

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Marcus & Co. Art Nouveau 18kt Gold Black Opal and Enamel Stick Pin

Marcus & Co. Art Nouveau 18kt Gold, Peridot, Diamond, Enamel Ring

This distinctive ring epitomizes Marcus & Co.''s liberal interpretation of Renaissance jewelry forms, fluidly merged with the Art Nouveau aesthetic of which the firm, along with Tiffany, was a leading American proponent. The flowing gold form, masterfully textured with Marcus''s unmistakable style of chasing and engraving, is enhanced with vibrant green enamel over a prepared ground that offers subtle shading and depth of color. Twinstone rings were first popularized in the late 18th century, when a young Napoleon presented Josephine with a so-called "toi et moi" engagement ring, the first of many historic jewelry gifts from the future emperor to the stylish widow he passionately loved. The ring is enhanced by two round-cut peridots totaling approximately 1.60 carats, and 30 round-cut diamonds that weigh approximately 1.20 carats. The green basse-taille enamel continues around the shank, which is enhanced at the reverse by a diamond. The multi-generational New York firm of Marcus & Co was founded by an ambitious young German immigrant who had trained with a prominent court jeweler in Dresden. In 1892, after working with Charles Lewis Tiffany, Hermann Marcus and his sons William and George together set up a business that soon became a glittering New York society institution renowned not only for its superb diamonds, colored stones and pearls, but also its instantly recognizabl ... e, original design style. The firm produced great jewels in the Art Nouveau and Arts & Crafts sensibility, with George, the artist/designer, drawing inspiration from sources as diverse as the contemporary French masters, the Moghuls and Maharajahs, the garland style of the Ancien Regime, and the genius of Renaissance goldsmiths. George''s distinctive, confident hand was always discernible in Marcus creations. Working as a team with George, William was a gem and pearl connoisseur who travelled the world hunting for exceptional gem material, including purchasing the entire production of never-before-seen black opal from Lightning Ridge Australia in 1908. Marcus exhibited at the 1900 Exposition Universelle in Paris, and their work won prizes from the prestigious Society of Arts & Crafts of Boston. Plique-à-jour enamel was an art in which the firm excelled. Displaying a mastery equal to that of the French artists, they created jewels with unprecedented three-dimensional depth in this medium. The firm and family were well-known for their charitable activities and promotion of young jewelers such as Raymond Yard. The firm''s jewelry is a focus of the collection of the American Wing at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

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Marcus & Co. Art Nouveau 18kt Gold, Peridot, Diamond, Enamel Ring

Marcus & Co. Early-20th Century Diamond, Natural Pearl, Platinum and Gold Ring

An American Early 20th Century platinum and 18 karat gold ring with diamonds and natural pearl by Marcus & Co. The ring has 3 old mine-cut diamonds with an approximate weight of 1.25, 1.35 and 1.05 carats, L/M color, SI clarity respectively, and 10 old European-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of .10 carat. The center of this ring is a natural pearl measuring 7.91 x 7.86 mm. Gemological Institute of America Certificate stating natural saltwater pearl #2155277139. The multi-generational New York firm of Marcus & Co was founded by an ambitious young German immigrant who had trained at a prominent Dresden court jeweler. In 1892, after working with Charles Lewis Tiffany, Hermann Marcus and his sons William and George together set up a business that soon became a glittering New York society institution renowned not only for its superb diamonds, colored stones and pearls, but also its instantly recognizable, original design style. The firm produced great jewels in the Art Nouveau and Arts & Crafts sensibility, with George, the artist/designer, drawing inspiration from sources as diverse and exotic as the contemporary French masters, the Moghuls and Maharajahs, the garland style of the Ancien Regime, and the genius of Renaissance goldsmiths. George''s distinctive, confident hand was always discernible in Marcus creations. Working as a team with George, his brother Wil ... liam was a gem and pearl connoisseur who travelled the world hunting fine gem material, including purchasing the entire production of never-before-seen black opal in Lightning Ridge Australia in 1908. Marcus exhibited at the 1900 Exposition Universelle in Paris, and their work won prizes at the prestigious Society of Arts & Crafts of Boston. Plique-a-jour enamel was an art in which Marcus & Co. excelled, creating jewels with unprecedented three-dimensional depth in this medium. The firm and family were well-known for their charitable activities and promotion of young jewelers such as Raymond Yard.

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Marcus & Co. Early-20th Century Diamond, Natural Pearl, Platinum and Gold Ring

Marcus & Co. Art Nouveau Pearl, Diamond and Emerald Brooch

In this lavish brooch, Marcus & Co. offers a Mughal-style jewel interpreted through the lens of American masters of the Art Nouveau. Open to inspiration from great global art, Marcus created this intriguing ornament expressing Mughal sensibility and form, over-spilling with lustrous natural pearls and an emerald drop, gems the empire had eagerly imported from the Arabian Gulf and Colombia. The distinctive, highly-textured Marcus gold work, with its miniature scrolls, incised circles and tiny graduated beads, serves to enhance the fluid lines and organic presence. Wearable on a simple black ribbon or cord, the jewel is a statement of global vision and artistic virtuosity. The pendant-brooch is set with 10 semi-spherical pearls, 15 Old European-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of 1.25 carats , suspending an emerald bead. Gemological Institute of America certificate #2171449596 states the pearls are natural saltwater button pearls. The multi-generational New York firm of Marcus & Co was founded by an ambitious young German immigrant who had trained with a prominent court jeweler in Dresden. In 1892, after working with Charles Lewis Tiffany, Hermann Marcus and his sons William and George together set up a business that soon became a glittering New York society institution renowned not only for its superb diamonds, colored stones and pearls, but also its instantly r ... ecognizable, original design style. The firm produced great jewels in the Art Nouveau and Arts & Crafts sensibility, with George, the artist/designer, drawing inspiration from sources as diverse as the contemporary French masters, the Moghuls and Maharajahs, the garland style of the Ancien Regime, and the genius of Renaissance goldsmiths. George''s distinctive, confident hand was always discernible in Marcus creations. Working as a team with George, William was a gem and pearl connoisseur who travelled the world hunting for exceptional gem material, including purchasing the entire production of never-before-seen black opal from Lightning Ridge Australia in 1908. Marcus exhibited at the 1900 Exposition Universelle in Paris, and their work won prizes from the prestigious Society of Arts & Crafts of Boston. Plique-à-jour enamel was an art in which the firm excelled. Displaying a mastery equal to that of the French artists, they created jewels with unprecedented three-dimensional depth in this medium. The firm and family were well-known for their charitable activities and promotion of young jewelers such as Raymond Yard. The firm''s jewelry is a focus of the collection of the American Wing at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

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Marcus & Co. Art Nouveau Pearl, Diamond and Emerald Brooch

Marcus & Co. Art Nouveau White Opal and Chrysoprase, Plique-à-Jour Enamel and Gold Pendant Brooch

This Art Nouveau pendant-brooch by Marcus & Co. presents a flowing form abstracted from the delicate shapes of flowers and leafy vines. Its subtle coloration comes from the use of unusual materials, such as rare chrysoprase and translucent plique-à-jour enamel, whose organic greens are set off by pools of spectral hues provided by the shimmering opals. Signature Marcus gold work, characterized by the miniature scrolls, incised circles, stippling, and graduated beads, adds to the organic feeling of the flowing form. Wearable on a simple black ribbon or cord, it is a statement of inspired naturalism. The pendant brooch is set with 6 cabochon white opals, 63 cabochon chrysoprase stones, and is highlighted by plique-à-jour enamel. Suspended from the brooch is an opal and chrysoprase pendant drop. Detachable brooch finding and flip-down bail. Shown in the Poster House (New York) exhibition "Alphonse Mucha: Art Nouveau./Nouvelle Femme," June 20-October 6, 2019.  The multi-generational New York firm of Marcus & Co was founded by an ambitious young German immigrant who had trained with a prominent court jeweler in Dresden. In 1892, after working with Charles Lewis Tiffany, Hermann Marcus and his sons William and George together set up a business that soon became a glittering New York society institution renowned not only for its superb diamonds, colored stones and pearls, but also ... its instantly recognizable, original design style. The firm produced great jewels in the Art Nouveau and Arts & Crafts sensibility, with George, the artist/designer, drawing inspiration from sources as diverse as the contemporary French masters, the Moghuls and Maharajahs, the garland style of the Ancien Regime, and the genius of Renaissance goldsmiths. George''s distinctive, confident hand was always discernible in Marcus creations. Working as a team with George, William was a gem and pearl connoisseur who travelled the world hunting for exceptional gem material, including purchasing the entire production of never-before-seen black opal from Lightning Ridge Australia in 1908. Marcus exhibited at the 1900 Exposition Universelle in Paris, and their work won prizes from the prestigious Society of Arts & Crafts of Boston. Plique-à-jour enamel was an art in which the firm excelled. Displaying a mastery equal to that of the French artists, they created jewels with unprecedented three-dimensional depth in this medium. The firm and family were well-known for their charitable activities and promotion of young jewelers such as Raymond Yard. The firm''s jewelry is a focus of the collection of the American Wing at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

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Marcus & Co. Art Nouveau White Opal and Chrysoprase, Plique-à-Jour Enamel and Gold Pendant Brooch

An American Art Nouveau 18 karat gold, enamel, sapphire and diamond ring by Marcus & Co.

This alluring ring presents a large, richly colored sapphire within an organic setting, enhancing the gemstone with the distinctive Art Nouveau spirit particular to Marcus & Co. The cushion-shaped stone lightly nestles within a bed of stylized leaves, subtly held in place by integral scrolling tendrils and tight little buds. The gold is chased and engraved throughout to impart a visually complex surface and vital feel. Embedded diamonds bring brilliance and sparkle to the living structure, while touches of blue enamel help unify the overall composition. The jewel merges the beauty of the mineral and the organic worlds into a compelling work of art. The ring is set with a cushion-cut blue sapphire with an approximate weight of 8.65 carats, and 27 old European-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of .32 carat. The blue sapphire is most likely of Ceylon origin with no heat treatment evident. The multi-generational New York firm of Marcus & Co was founded by an ambitious young German immigrant who had trained with a prominent court jeweler in Dresden. In 1892, after working with Charles Lewis Tiffany, Hermann Marcus and his sons William and George together set up a business that soon became a glittering New York society institution renowned not only for its superb diamonds, colored stones and pearls, but also its instantly recognizable, original design style. The firm ... produced great jewels in the Art Nouveau and Arts & Crafts sensibility, with George, the artist/designer, drawing inspiration from sources as diverse as the contemporary French masters, the Moghuls and Maharajahs, the garland style of the Ancien Regime, and the genius of Renaissance goldsmiths. George''s distinctive, confident hand was always discernible in Marcus creations. Working as a team with George, William was a gem and pearl connoisseur who travelled the world hunting for exceptional gem material, including purchasing the entire production of never-before-seen black opal from Lightning Ridge Australia in 1908. Marcus exhibited at the 1900 Exposition Universelle in Paris, and their work won prizes from the prestigious Society of Arts & Crafts of Boston. Plique-à-jour enamel was an art in which the firm excelled. Displaying a mastery equal to that of the French artists, they created jewels with unprecedented three-dimensional depth in this medium. The firm and family were well-known for their charitable activities and promotion of young jewelers such as Raymond Yard. The firm''s jewelry is a focus of the collection of the American Wing at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

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An American Art Nouveau 18 karat gold, enamel, sapphire and diamond ring by Marcus & Co.

French Art Nouveau Lighted Bronze Sculpture "La Voie Lactée" by Laporte Blairsy

A French Art Nouveau silvered bronze sculpture by Leo Laporte-Blairsy featuring a glass globe by Daum Nancy. The globe is in translucent blue glass decorated with white five-pointed stars. "La Voie Lactée" (The Milky Way) was first exhibited at the Société des Artistes Français in 1904 for which Laporte-Blairsy was a awarded the high honor of a first class medal. In this daring work by controversial Art Nouveau sculptor Laporte-Blairsy, the spirit of creation is depicted as a regal, elegant beauty. Resolving herself out of a swirl of cosmic dust scattered with stars, she gently suspends the expanding galaxy (of Daum glass) with an expression of intelligence and pride of creation. The sculptor''s early embrace of electricity is integral to the design: the figure is lit from within by this new form of illumination which, at the time, represented the revolutionary soul of invention. Laporte-Blairsy is also famous for a statuary fountain, situated in the central square of Toulouse, of the graceful and mysterious Clémence Isaure, a legendary Renaissance noblewoman who was the benefactor of and inspiration for the first poetry festival in Europe.The young woman holding the glass globe wears a collar in the shape of a five-pointed star. The collar is decorated along its border with more five-pointed stars. The woman also wears a five-pointed star in her hair, and the lower portion of ... her flowing dress and her cape are covered with more five-pointed stars, including some that pierce the metal. Her billowing sleeves help to frame the globe. She wears bows on each shoulder. Laporte-Blairsy was an incredibly divisive artist in his time. To the critics of the avante-garde literary magazine, "La Nouvelle Revue," the lighting of Laporte-Blairsy was a revelation. The magazine lauded Laporte-Blairsy as being "infinitely ingenious.... the Scheherazade of electric lamps.... bringing about a second enlightenment." By comparison, the lighting of Leo Laporte-Blairsy offended the immutable sensibilities of the Parisian old-guard. Maurice Hamel remarked in the 1904 "Revue des Arts Décoratifs" that Laporte-Blairsy broke the artichtectonic laws of decoration, labeling the artist a rulebreaker, or "hors-la-loi". In comparison to the inoffensive figuration of the French Renaissance, the rhythmic drapery of Laporte-Blairsy was tormented. Part of Laporte-Blairsy''s technical innovation was bringing out the unique characteristics of incandescent lighting. While gas powered lighting required vents and open structure, Laporte-Blairsy used the globe and balloon motif to trap and emit bewitching glows. The end of the 19th century marked the centenary of the invention of the hot air balloon. The recent flight of the Wright Brothers, coupled with numerous high profile hot air balloon flights, made balloonmania rise to an all time high. A similar sculpture is featured in "Art Nouveau and Art Deco Lighting," New York, 1978, by Alastair Duncan, p. 111, fig. 52. Also in "The Paris Salons 1895-1914, Vol. V: Objets D''Art & Metalware," Woodbridge, 1999, p. 367 (design illustrated). And in Victor Arwas, "Art Nouveau: The French Aesthetic," London, Andreas Papadakis, 2002, modèle reproduit p. 270.

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French Art Nouveau Lighted Bronze Sculpture 'La Voie Lactée' by Laporte Blairsy

Antique Renaissance Revival Amethyst, Diamond, Natural Pearl, Gold and Enamel Necklace

An English Antique 15 karat gold necklace with amethyst, diamond and pearl. The necklace has an oval cut amethyst approximately 9.50 carats, 30 old mine-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of .30 carats, and 24 natural pearls approximately 2mm. With enamel plaques in a Renaissance Revival motif.

Antique Renaissance Revival Amethyst, Diamond, Natural Pearl, Gold and Enamel Necklace

Decorated Enameled Silver Jewelry Box by Elizabeth Ethel Copeland.

Elizabeth Edith Copeland was a talented enamellist and metalsmith of the Arts & Crafts period. Her artistic ambitions were frustrated for years, but at the age of thirty Copeland found a way to juggle her daily duties on her family''s dairy farm with classes in art and design in Boston. She pored over her class notes while ironing, remarking drolly that "No doubt the garments suffered." Thankfully, she persisted, attracting the attention of a wealthy patron, Sarah Choate Sears, an accomplished photographer and watercolorist who had won prizes at four world expositions. Sears sent Copeland to London for a year to apprentice under the renowned enamellist Alexander Fisher. Like her Boston colleague, the accomplished jeweler Josephine Hartwell Shaw, Copeland earned the prestigious "Medalist" title from the Society of Arts & Crafts. Her metalwork and jewelry have entered the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Art Institute of Chicago, and the Boston Museum of Fine Arts. This silver box shows Copeland''s work at its best, the richly-colored poppies and senstiive, hand-wrought artistry attesting to her deep affinity with the enamellists of the Renaissance. A similarly exquisite enamel and silver box by Copeland is on view in the Metropolitan Museum of Art''s 150th Anniversary exhibition, "THE MET 150". The Detroit Institute of Arts has since 1919 had a Ciborium in silver and enamel as part of their collection.

Decorated Enameled Silver Jewelry Box by Elizabeth Ethel Copeland.

Tiffany Studios New York Art "Magnolia" Enamel Vase.

A Tiffany Studios New York Art Nouveau "Magnolia", gold, white, pink, red, and green enamel on copper vase, by Louis Comfort Tiffany. This bespoke "Magnolia" enamel vase was designed from watercolor renderings and photographs from the enamel department''s lead designer, Agnes Northrop. Northrop depicted the saucer magnolia (Magnolia soulangiana) on this enamel vase, an Asian variety that was hybridized in France and then introduced in this country in the early nineteenth century. Magnolias were among Tiffany''s favorite flowers, so much so that three "Magnolia" window panels decorated his first 72nd Street home and his garden estate, Laurelton Hall. In an interview for Town and Country Magazine, Tiffany compared his enameled vases against sapphires, topaz, opal, aquamarine, and other stones, and concluded that the enamels "showed much more depth and perspective than were found in the stones", an insight sensitively demonstrated in this monumental and masterful vase. Tiffany took a painterly, impressionist approach to his enamel work, in intentional contrast to renowned Japonesque and Renaissance Revival masters like Eugene Richet (enamel master for the house of Fontenay), Antoine Tard (enamel master for the house of Falize), and Paul Briançon (House of René Lalique). Much in the way that Tiffany used gemstones in his early jewels as mere means to achieve color effects and mome ... ntary impressions of nature, here, his use of opulent, varicolored enamel conveys the essence of the flowers on the verge of full bloom, already overspilling the form. There was some minor touch up to the enamel at the top, otherwise it''s in lovely original condition. This Magnolia vase was exhibited in the Japanese leg of the Tiffany Masterworks exhibition that originated at the Metropolitan Museum of Art several years ago.

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Tiffany Studios New York Art 'Magnolia' Enamel Vase.

Victorian Gold Locket

An English Victorian 15 karat gold locket. The polished oval locket and bail with vertically-set cable chain wirework motif, opening to an interior with double compartments enclosed under glass panes, with interior inscription "Mary Graham May 6, 1873." Lockets became items of sentimental jewelry in the Renaissance, when Queen Elizabeth commissioned a locket ring, which she never took off, containing a portrait of her mother, Anne Boleyn, in one compartment and herself in the other. In the era of Queen Victoria, lockets were often given to commemorate romance, birthdays, or a new baby, and contained portraits of loved ones.

Victorian Gold Locket

Art Nouveau "Algues et Poissons" Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

A French Art Nouveau "Algues et Poissons" cameo glass vase by Daum, from a design by Henri Bergé, featuring a sensitively rendered enamel painting of seascape of fish, crayfish, and hermit crabs feeding on flowering algae. The vase consists of an intercalaire layer of blue and green powdered glass cased in burgundy glass carved with delicate algae stems. The vase demonstrates Bergé''s early experimentation with underwater imagery, preceding his collaboration with legendary glass artist Amalric Walter. Bergé''s inclusion of crayfish imagery reflects the 19th century''s renewed interest in the work of Renaissance artist Bernard Palissy. Palissy created naturalist works spangled with ceramic castings of animals of the New World. Among Palissy''s favorite motifs was the crayfish, newly discovered in the French colony of Louisiana. Palissy''s works decorated the most eminent courts of Europe, from the Medicis to the gardens of Marie Antoinette. A similar vase is pictured in: "Daum Nancy: Maîtres Verriers," by Katharina Büttiker, Zurich: Galerie Katharina Büttiker, 2001, p. 25.

Art Nouveau 'Algues et Poissons' Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

18kt Gold, Black Opal, Diamond and Enamel Ring by Marcus & Co.

This exuberant ring, with its rich colors and materials, represents Marcus & Co.''s characteristic fusion of historic and global jewelry styles within the Art Nouveau sensibility. Along with the graduating lines of diamond melee framing the central stone, fields of glowing enamel among tiny hand-formed beads and textured gold scrolls help direct the eye toward the vividly colored opal, a specimen which is remarkable in its broad flash of reddish orange and its blue-green depths. The firm was an early and dominant importer of fabled Australian black opal into the U.S., thanks to the expertise and tireless gem-seeking expeditions of William Marcus, the founder''s son. Centering a black opal cabochon framed by 27 old mine-cut diamonds, approximate total weight of 0.65 carat, further enhanced by a blue and green basse-taille enamel surround and shoulders with chased high-relief gold scroll and bead motifs throughout. The multi-generational New York firm of Marcus & Co was founded by an ambitious young German immigrant who had trained with a prominent court jeweler in Dresden. In 1892, after working with Charles Lewis Tiffany, Hermann Marcus and his sons William and George together set up a business that soon became a glittering New York society institution renowned not only for its superb diamonds, colored stones and pearls, but also its instantly recognizable, original design s ... tyle. The firm produced great jewels in the Art Nouveau and Arts & Crafts sensibility, with George, the artist/designer, drawing inspiration from sources as diverse as the contemporary French masters, the Moghuls and Maharajahs, the garland style of the Ancien Regime, and the genius of Renaissance goldsmiths. George''s distinctive, confident hand was always discernible in Marcus creations. Working as a team with George, William was a gem and pearl connoisseur who travelled the world hunting for exceptional gem material, including purchasing the entire production of never-before-seen black opal from Lightning Ridge Australia in 1908. Marcus exhibited at the 1900 Exposition Universelle in Paris, and their work won prizes from the prestigious Society of Arts & Crafts of Boston. Plique-à-jour enamel was an art in which the firm excelled. Displaying a mastery equal to that of the French artists, they created jewels with unprecedented three-dimensional depth in this medium. The firm and family were well-known for their charitable activities and promotion of young jewelers such as Raymond Yard. The firm''s jewelry is a focus of the collection of the American Wing at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

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18kt Gold, Black Opal, Diamond and Enamel Ring by Marcus & Co.