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French Art Nouveau Bronze Sculpture by Rivere

A French Art Nouveau patinated bronze sculpture by Théodore Rivie`re, featuring two intricately-sculpted figures from the story of Carthage. The woman has emerald eyes and her crown is accented with rubies. The subject of this figural sculpture is taken from Gustave Flaubert''s novel, "Salammbô." The story takes place between 241 and 238 BC, during the war between Carthage and its mercenaries, who were in revolt. Mâthô, the Lybian rebel chief, fell in love with Salammbô, the daughter of the Carthaginian leader. This scene depicts the moment when the mortally wounded Mâthô dies at Salammbô''s feet, declaring his love for her. The figure of Salammbô, the femme fatale,also inspired other Symbolist artists. Pictured in: "Art Nouveau 1890-1914", V&A exhibit by Paul Greenhalgh, page 122; "Nineteenth Century Sculpture" by Maurice Rheims, p. 372 # 15; and in: "Dynamic Beauty: Sculpture of Art Nouveau Paris" by Macklowe Gallery, The Studley Press, 2011, p. 229.

French Art Nouveau Bronze Sculpture by Rivere

Tiffany Studios New York "Tel el Amarna" Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York "Tel el Amarna" Favrile glass vase with an iridescent blue body and a brilliant cobalt blue foot and rim featuring an Egyptian-inspired grey and white "Tel el Amarna" motif. Similary decorated vases are pictured in: "The Art of Louis Comfort Tiffany," by Tessa Paul, New York: Exeter Books, 1987, p. 75.

Tiffany Studios New York 'Tel el Amarna' Vase

Decorated Glass Vase by Louis Comfort Tiffany

A decorated glass vase by Louis Comfort Tiffany. This vase has a vivid iridescent blue pulled feather design on an iridescent charcoal background. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: "The Art Glass of Louis Comfort Tiffany," by Paul E. Doros, New York: The Vendome Press, 2013, p. 212, fig. 169.

Decorated Glass Vase by Louis Comfort Tiffany

René Boivin Art Deco Platinum, Peridot and Diamond Ring

A French Art Deco platinum ring with peridot and diamonds by René Boivin. The ring centers on a cushion-cut peridot with an approximate weight of 3.25 carats, surrounded by 60 pavé set round-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of 3.60 carats. With Certificate of Authenticity from Madame Françoise Cailles, expert for Boivin. René Boivin has been one of the most significant jewelry houses for the best part of a century since its late 19th Century beginnings under its founder Jules René Boivin. The significant legacy is due in no small measure to Jeanne Boivin, who took over her husband''s business after his death in 1917. Rather than wholly embracing the Art Deco trend that engulfed the rest of the French jewelry world in the late 1920s and early 1930s, she was also inspired by the exoticism that was enchanting the likes of Picasso and Paul Gauguin. Remaining close to the design greats such as Sandoz or Fouquet, she added her own feminine eye to the movement''s ideals with the help of Suzanne Belperron from 1921 to 1932. The Boivin house would go on to create many spectacular jewels famously inspired by nature and sea life. A similar ring is pictured in "Rene Boivin Jeweller", by Françoise Cailles, Quartet Books, 1994.

René Boivin Art Deco Platinum, Peridot and Diamond Ring

French Art Nouveau Ceramic Clock by Follot

An Austrian Art Nouveau porcelain and silvered clock by Paul Follot edited by fellow ceramicist Alexander Förster. This clock prominently features the arabesquing line of the Art Nouveau movement, both in shape and in the relief decoration. Abstract blue flower buds decorate the clock in panels at the top and behind the clock face. The silvered clock face and pendulum are also decorated in the whiplash motif, which makes this clock a complete and total work of Art Nouveau. A similar clock is pictured in: "Art Nouveau: The French Aesthetic," by Victor Arwas, London: Andreas Papadakis, 2002, p. 333; a similar clock is also pictured in the 1904 Louis Majorelle catalog, in the "Les Algues" Chamber, near the end of the catalog.

French Art Nouveau Ceramic Clock by Follot

Tiffany Studios New York Favrile Paperweight Vase

A Favrile "paperweight" vase by Tiffany Studios New York. The earliest examples of "paperweight" objects appeared around 1900, Louis Comfort Tiffany loved this technique of encasing a design within a dome of transparent glass because it was a great vehicle for expressing his love of nature, particularly flowers. This vase is internally decorated with gladiolus flowers with yellow, green and purple threads. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: "The Art Glass of Louis Comfort Tiffany," by Paul E. Doros, New York: The Vendome Press, 2013, p. 136, fig.82. Also pictured in "Louis Comfort Tiffany," by Jacob Baal-Teshuva, New York: Taschen, 2001, page 291.

Tiffany Studios New York Favrile Paperweight Vase

Bronze Portrait of Sarah Bernhardt by Paul François Berthoud

A French Art Nouveau gilt and patinated bronze portrait of Sarah Bernhardt by Paul François Berthoud. Sarah Bernhardt was the most important dramatic actress of the 19th century. She is portrayed here with a jeweled sash and flowing hair, no doubt a reference to her role as Gismonda in the play by Victorien Sardou. A slightly different portrait sculpture of Bernhardt by Berthoud is in the collection of the Musée d''Orsay.

Bronze Portrait of Sarah Bernhardt by Paul François Berthoud

Floral Vase by Tiffany Studios New York

A Favrile flower form vase by Louis Comfort Tiffany. The vase is iridescent yellow, with hints of orange, and has a ruffled rim. Favrile glass vases in the shapes of stylized flowers were among the earliest creations of the Tiffany Glass and Decorating Company, forerunner of Tiffany Studios. Initial examples of this technique date from approximately 1894, although later pieces show greater refinement. Flower forms have great variety in stem length and rim shape. A similar vase is pictured in: "Tiffany at Auction," by Alastair Duncan, New York: Rizzoli, 1981, p. 24, cat. no. 44; "The Tiffany Collection of the Chrysler Museum at Norfolk," by Paul E. Doros, Richmond, VA: W. M. Brown & son, Inc., 1978, p. 32, cat. no. 26; "Louis Comfort Tiffany," by Jacob Baal-Teshuva, New York: Taschen, 2001, p. 260; "The Art Glass of Louis Comfort Tiffany," by Paul E. Doros, New York: The Vendome Press, 2013, p. 74, fig. 27.

Floral Vase by Tiffany Studios New York

Tiffany Studios New York American "Lava" Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York American Art Nouveau "Lava" vase A visit to Mount Etna in Sicily during one of its eruptions is said to have inspired Tiffany to capture in glass the force and beauty of the molten volcanic flows and basaltic rock formations that he observed there. The free-form abstract drippings of gold molten glass and the speckled blue and gold ground recreate the naturalistic effects of flowing lava and make this vase an exceptional example of the form. Provenance: The Garden Museum Collection, Matsue, Japan and Important Art Nouveau from the Private Collection of Lloyd & Barbara Macklowe at Sotheby''s 1995 This vase is pictured in: "A Selection of 300 Works From Louis C. Tiffany Garden Museum," by Takeo Horiuchi, Japan: Greco Corporation Fine Art Department, 2001, p. 250. A similar piece is also in the collection of the Chrysler Museum in Norfolk, VA: "The Tiffany Collection of the Chrysler Museum at Norfolk," by Paul E. Doros, Richmond, VA: W. M. Brown & son, Inc., 1978, p. 70, plate 69. Also pictured in "Tiffany Favrile Glass and the Quest of Beauty," by Martin Eidelberg, page 29, plate 28.

Tiffany Studios New York American 'Lava' Vase

Tiffany Morning Glory Paperweight Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York "Paperweight" vase by Louis Comfort Tiffany. A major innovation in Tiffany''s work around 1900 involved the encasement of hot glass with an additional transparent layer--a technique associated with paperweights. The added layer of clear glass produced a three-dimensional effect, as though the plants existed in a lower level, beneath the surface. Most of Tiffany''s early "Paperweight" vases had a clear body with a gold iridescent core, adding to the poetic effect. This particular vase displays purple and white cream morning glories with green veined leaves and stems against an iridescent translucent light green hued ground. The difficulty of creating naturalistic imagery in hot glass should not be underestimated. The detailed representation of the morning glory blossoms with their star-like markings makes this vase highly desirable. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: "Louis C. Tiffany: Artist for the Ages," by Marilynn A. Johnson, London: Scala Publishers, Ltd., 2005, p. 150, ca. not. 56; "The Art Glass of Louis Comfort Tiffany", by Paul E. Doros, New York: The Vendome Press, 2013, p. 140, fig. 89; and in: "Louis Comfort Tiffany at Tiffany & Co.," by John Loring, New York: Harry N. Abrams, Inc., 2002, page 163.

Tiffany Morning Glory Paperweight Vase

Gauthier & Poinsignon French Settee

A French settee by Camille Gauthier & Paul Poinsignon. The settee in mahogany has carved stylized flowers on the back, arms and below the seat. Upholstered in green fabric.

Gauthier & Poinsignon French Settee

Pair of French Gauthier & Poinsignon Side Chairs

A pair of French side chairs in mahogany by Camille Gauthier & Paul Poinsignon. The chairs have carved stylized flowers on their backs, arms and below the seats. They are upholstered in green fabric.

Pair of French Gauthier & Poinsignon Side Chairs

Tiffany Studios New York Enamel Box

A Tiffany Studios New York "Olive" covered box by, executed by the Enamelware Department of Stonebridge Glass Company, New York. This fabulous masterpiece is composed of enameled copper. The cover is decorated with olives, purple-brown copper branches and deep green leaves. From Paul Doros: "This enameled covered box clearly reveals the quality and innovative artistry that led to the company winning a gold medal at that world''s fair. It is of a familiar form but features an unusual motif and palette. Both the cover and slightly ribbed body have a repoussé design of ripening olives and pendant leaves on sinuous branches, one of them forming an irregular sculptural handle. The gold background is particularly noteworthy. Most Tiffany enamels of this type have a ground in shades of either red or blue. The background used in this object is perfectly suited, as it suggests olives ripening under a warm, golden sun. Hints of gold glimmer and sparkle through the slightly iridescent aubergine and purple olives, as well as the green leaves, adding to the illusion. It was pieces such as this one that caused contemporary critics to proclaim Tiffany''s enamels as "rare works of art" as well as "visions of delight." Paul Doros is former curator of glass at the Chrysler Museum of Art (Norfolk, Virginia) and author of The Art Glass of Louis Comfort Tiffany (New York: Vendome Press) ... , 2013. PROVENANCE Parke-Bernet Galleries Inc., New York Private Collection, New York, circa 1965 Thence by descent to the present owners LITERATURE Martin Eidelberg and Nancy McClelland, "Behind the Scenes of Tiffany Glassmaking: The Nash Notebooks," New York, 2001, pp. 21 and 178 (for the model executed in pottery) Alastair Duncan, "Louis C. Tiffany: The Garden Museum Collection," Woodbridge, Suffolk, 2004, pp. 466 (for the model executed in pottery) and 471 (for the model executed in bronze pottery)

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Tiffany Studios New York Enamel Box

Tiffany Studios "Cypriote" Miniature Vase

An early and unusual Tiffany Favrile glass Cypriote vase. The rounded body of the vase is decorated near the tapered neck and near the foot with an iridescent swirling motif in richly saturated tones of gold and ochre, framing a series of central pointed oval "window" panels of textured "Cypriote" glass, resting on a small circular foot, signed on the underside. Cypriote is a textured glass achieved at Tiffany Glass and Decorating Company by rolling glass over a marble or iron surface covered with pulverized bits of the same glass. Its iridescence and bubbles resembled the decomposed surface of Roman glass discovered during archeological explorations on the island of Cyprus, hence its name. Lava glass evolved from Cypriote glass by using thicker, brighter glass and dripping golden glass irregularly over the surface. Tiffany created a unique numbering system for his artistic glass. Beginning in 1892, glassware was progressively signed 1-9999. The next series deployed an "A" as a prefix, making it easy to date this "E" prefix vase to 1896. Vases with prefixes of J, N and V have dates confirmed by international exhibitions, as do vases with suffixes of J and M. Vases from 1928, the last year of production were signed with a suffix "W". It appears that starting in 1906 each new year ushered in a new letter. While the diligence of the Tiffany Studios records cannot be veri ... fied due to a catastrophic fire that closed the factory in 1928, if one follows the logic of the numbering system it is possible that as many as 490,000 artistic vases were produced at the Tiffany Studios New York from 1892-1928. A similar vase is pictured in:" The Tiffany Collection of the Chrysler Museum at Norfolk," by Paul E. Doros, Richmond, VA: W. M. Brown & son, Inc., 1978, p. 59, cat. no. 57; and in: "Timeless Beauty: The Art of Louis Comfort Tiffany," Atglen, PA: Schiffer Publishing, 2016, p. 79.

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Tiffany Studios 'Cypriote' Miniature Vase

Gauthier Dining Suite

A French Art Nouveau dining suite featuring a dining table with two custom leaves, a set of six mahogany dining chairs with tooled leather and brass tacks and a sideboard featuring a mirror, bronze accents and a marble top by Camille Gauthier & Paul Poinsignon. The sideboard is carved with berries and leaves. It has bronze inlays and a bronze drawer-pull in a sinuous leaf and twisted vine motif. The berries and leaves are also carved into the legs and base of the table. Each tooled leather chair back is affixed with bronze studs and decorated with a different floral image. Dimensions: Dining Table: 29-1/2'''' high x 45'''' wide x 50-1/2'''' long, extends with three leaves to 122-1/2". Dining Chairs: 38¾'''' high x 17'''' wide x 17'''' deep. Sideboard: : 62¾'''' high x 51'''' wide x 21'''' deep.

Gauthier Dining Suite

Tiffany Studios New York "Tel el Amarna" Vase

A rare and monumental Tiffany Studios New York "Tel el Amarna" Favrile glass vase with an iridescent cobalt blue body and a brilliant turquoise blue foot and rim. Vases with zigzag decoration such as this have been commonly called "Tel el Amarna," after the decorative motifs of ancient Egypt. However, recent research has shown that Tiffany actually intended these vases to be referred to as "Byzantine," with the exception of vases featuring the brilliant blue color associated with the blue faience of the Eighteenth Dynasty of Amarna, Egypt, circa 1346 BC. This is the largest and most brilliantly colored vase of this genre that Macklowe Gallery has had the privilege of owning in our 50 years specializing in the artistic glass of Louis Comfort Tiffany. Similary decorated vases are pictured in: "The Art of Louis Comfort Tiffany", by Tessa Paul, New York: Exeter Books, 1987, p. 75.

Tiffany Studios New York 'Tel el Amarna' Vase

Paul Follot Coffee and Tea Service

A rare and important French Art Nouveau silvered metal coffee and tea service by Paul Follot. The set includes a tray, tea and a coffee pots, and containers for sugar and cream. The set is decorated with whiplash curves, fabric-like folds and a spray of monnaie du pape ("the Pope''s money") leaves. This set was manufactured by Metallwarren Fabrik, F.w. Quist, Esslingen, Germany. All five pieces are signed "Follot". The service was exhibited at the Salon Décorateurs in 1904. The model is in the Musée d''Orsay, the Victoria and Albert Museum, and the Brohan Museum (Berlin). In the year 2000, an identical set was exhibited in Art Nouveau 1890-1914 at the Victoria & Albert Museum and the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC. Provenance: Purchased in Wiesbaden, Germany from a prominent lady who is now in her late sixties. This tea service, with its original box, was her mother''s wedding gift. Similar set pictured in: "Art Nouveau: The French Aesthetic," by Victor Arwas, p. 393 Art Nouveau Belgium France, by Yvonne Brunhammer, p. 206, pl. 306 "Art Nouveau: 1890-1914," by Paul Greenhalgh, p. 234, pl. 14.13. "The French Decorative Arts, the Societé des Artistes Décorateurs 1900-1942," by Cf. Y. Brunhammer + S. Tise, Paris 1990, p. 16-17. "Art Nouveau," by Judith Miller, page 180. Dimensions: 16¾" wide x 24¼" long (tray)

Paul Follot Coffee and Tea Service

Tiffany Studios New York "Lava" Vase

An abstract figural "Lava" Favrile vase by Louis Comfort Tiffany. The cone shaped cylindrical vase features an upward spiral in gold metallic glass in high relief against a purplish-blue lava ground. Tiffany''s "Lava" glass was inspired by a trip to the Eastern Mediterranean, during which Tiffany visited Mount Etna in Sicily. The transformation of glass into volcanic "Lava" was achieved in the following manner: lustered glass was gathered on a blow pipe, rolled with chemical particles, and then worked in flame. The heat from the fire generated a reaction in which miniature basaltic-type craters and pitting formed on the surface of the glass, which was then coated with metallic lustered glass to create the purplish-blue ground imitative of lava. Next, free-form trails of glass were applied, each piece worked in a reduction flame (one starved of oxygen), and finally sprayed with metallic oxide. When a silvered finish fully developed it was sprayed with tin oxide and, depending on the artists, finished in blue, mauve, or gold tones. The production of Lava glass was the most risky of any Tiffany technique because it incorporated metallic oxides with different coefficients of expansion. When these were blended together during numerous high-temperature firings they created hazards for the annealing process that often flawed the pieces in their final moment of creation. The powerf ... ul form of the vase and the clean articulation of the different metallic finishes make this piece incredibly rare. A similar vase is pictured in: The Tiffany Collection of the Chrysler Museum at Norfolk, by Paul E. Doros, Richmond, VA: W. M. Brown & son, Inc., 1978, p. 53, cat. no. 64.

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Tiffany Studios New York 'Lava' Vase

Tiffany Studios New York Art "Magnolia" Enamel Vase.

A Tiffany Studios New York Art Nouveau "Magnolia", gold, white, pink, red, and green enamel on copper vase, by Louis Comfort Tiffany. This bespoke "Magnolia" enamel vase was designed from watercolor renderings and photographs from the enamel department''s lead designer, Agnes Northrop. Northrop depicted the saucer magnolia (Magnolia soulangiana) on this enamel vase, an Asian variety that was hybridized in France and then introduced in this country in the early nineteenth century. Magnolias were among Tiffany''s favorite flowers, so much so that three "Magnolia" window panels decorated his first 72nd Street home and his garden estate, Laurelton Hall. In an interview for Town and Country Magazine, Tiffany compared his enameled vases against sapphires, topaz, opal, aquamarine, and other stones, and concluded that the enamels "showed much more depth and perspective than were found in the stones", an insight sensitively demonstrated in this monumental and masterful vase. Tiffany took a painterly, impressionist approach to his enamel work, in intentional contrast to renowned Japonesque and Renaissance Revival masters like Eugene Richet (enamel master for the house of Fontenay), Antoine Tard (enamel master for the house of Falize), and Paul Briançon (House of René Lalique). Much in the way that Tiffany used gemstones in his early jewels as mere means to achieve color effects and mome ... ntary impressions of nature, here, his use of opulent, varicolored enamel conveys the essence of the flowers on the verge of full bloom, already overspilling the form. There was some minor touch up to the enamel at the top, otherwise it''s in lovely original condition. This Magnolia vase was exhibited in the Japanese leg of the Tiffany Masterworks exhibition that originated at the Metropolitan Museum of Art several years ago.

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Tiffany Studios New York Art 'Magnolia' Enamel Vase.

French Art Nouveau Bronze Planter "Chrysalide" by Berthoud

A French Art Nouveau patinated bronze planter, "Chrysalide" (Chrisalis), by Paul-François Berthoud, featuring the head of a woman emerging from foliage. The crest of the planter is further adorned by a repeating floral motif. Pictured in: "The Paris Salons 1895-1914, Volume V: Objets D'' Art & Metalware," page 86, by Alistair Duncan, The Antique Collectors'' Club, 1999 and in "Dynamic Beauty: Sculpture of Art Nouveau Paris," by Macklowe Gallery, The Studley Press, 2011, p. 55.

French Art Nouveau Bronze Planter 'Chrysalide' by Berthoud

Tiffany Studios New York "Calyx" Floriform Glass Vase

A Favrile flowerform vase by Tiffany Studios New York. The flower form vase is meant to suggest the forms, open or closed, of crocus or tulip flowers. This vase is tall and slender and colored with exquisite green and white effects. Here the flower is waiting to blossom. Favrile glass vases in the shapes of stylized flowers were among the earliest creations of the Tiffany Glass and Decorating Company, forerunner of Tiffany Studios. Initial examples of this technique date from approximately 1894, although later pieces show greater refinement. Flower forms have great variety in stem length and rim shape. A similar vase is pictured in: "The Tiffany Collection of the Chrysler Museum at Norfolk," by Paul E. Doros, Richmond, VA: W. M. Brown & son, Inc., 1978, p. 38, cat. no. 41; and in: "The Art Glass of Louis Comfort Tiffany," by Paul E. Doros, New York: The Vendome Press, 2013, p. 70. fig. 18.

Tiffany Studios New York 'Calyx' Floriform Glass Vase

A French Art Nouveau Wooden Pedestal by Emile Gallé

A French Art Nouveau "Bananie" selette by Émile Gallé. Gallé made very few selettes of this quality and design during his career, and even fewer of those with curved lower sections that reunite in the middle, culminating in the unfurling flower of the Sumatran Blood Banana. Galle wrote in his seminal text "Ecrits pour l''art" of his insipiration for his banana selette, the eighteenth century novel "Paul et Virginie." In the story, the pair of Mauritian lovers Paul and Virginie find a pure and socially equitable way of life, unconstrained by France''s strict social hierarchy. They make shelter and eat out of banana leaves, representing their harmony with nature and communal lifestyle. As an impassioned naturalist and socialist activist Gallle took the novel as a model for societal change. The marquetry on the top section of the selette depict columbines in full bloom. The curves and flowing details of the wood carving surrounding the top shelf come to challenge the stricter straight lines used for the contour of the piece. The balance between curves and straight line work in perfect harmony and together underline the subject matter. Circa 1903. A similar selette is pictured in: "Gallé Furniture", by Alastair Duncan and Georges de Bartha, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 2012, p. 245, plates 4 & 4a. A similar selette is pictured in: "Gallé Furniture", by Alas ... tair Duncan and Georges de Bartha, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 2012, p. 245, plates 4 & 4a.

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A French Art Nouveau Wooden Pedestal by Emile Gallé