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Antique Diamond, Emerald, Ruby Baroque Pearl Silver and Gold Brooch

A Victorian silver-top 18 karat gold, diamond, emerald, ruby and pearl brooch, featuring a depiction of the penultimate scene from the fable "Jack and the Beanstalk" in which Jack lures the giant by stealing the mermaid''s harp. A baroque pearl forms the tail of a sculpted 18-karat gold mermaid decorating the base of a lyre outlined with old mine-cut diamonds. The strings of the lyre are accented with emeralds, rubies, diamonds and a sapphire weighing approximately .30, .30, 1.75, and .05 carats respectively.

Antique Diamond, Emerald, Ruby Baroque Pearl Silver and Gold Brooch

Victorian English Gold and Reverse Crystal Hunting Brooch

An English Victorian 18 karat gold reverse crystal brooch. The finely painted crystal brooch represents ducks in lift-off. The yellow and red gold frame is decorated with dimensional pussy willows intertwined with ribbon. Reverse crystal intaglios are a rock crystal cabochon with an intaglio carved into the flat back and then painted realistically with oils, so that when, viewed from the top, the image has a three-dimensional effect. Finally, the back was sealed with mother-of-pearl, which preserved the painted areas. The motifs most commonly found were sporting themes -- horses, dogs, foxes and birds. The technique originated in Belgium c. 1860 and was popularized in England c. 1860''s by Thomas Cook.

Victorian English Gold and Reverse Crystal Hunting Brooch

Antique Essex Crystal and Gold Dog Brooch

An English Antique 15 karat gold brooch. The Victorian round Essex Crystal brooch portrays a terrier wwaring a red collar, with his tongue hanging out. An affectionate portrait of a beloved companion.

Antique Essex Crystal and Gold Dog Brooch

Tiffany Studios New York Glass Vase

An early Tiffany Studios New York favrile glass vase with pulled decoration. The vase features iridescent swirls in pinks and blues on a translucent pale brown background. Favrile is the trade name Tiffany gave to his blown art glass. The name derives from the Latin word fabrilis, meaning "made by hand." The technique was developed at the Tiffany Glass and Decorating Company in the mid-1890s using filaments from batches of differently colored glass and working the material while the glass was still molten. Ornamentation was added before the piece had its final shape, so that the decoration became fully integrated into the vessel. The technique was used in both decorative vases and functional pieces such as tableware (bowls, goblets, carafes) and lamp shades. Tiffany intended the favrile designation as a guarantee to current customers and future collectors of the fine quality of these objects. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: "Louis C. Tiffany: Artist for the Ages" by Marilynn A. Johnson, London: Scala Publishers, Ltd., 2005, p. 228, cat. 130. Also in the collection of the Victorian Albert Museum, documented in "Louis C. Tiffany: The Collected Works of Robert Koch," Atglen, PA: Schiffer, 2001, page 316.

Tiffany Studios New York Glass Vase

English Victorian Amethyst Pearl and Diamond Cuff Bracelet

An English Victorian 18 karat gold bangle bracelet with amethyst, diamonds and pearls. The hinged bangle bracelet centers on a cabochon amethyst with a ribbon of 9 rose-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of .26 carat. The center cluster is framed by 26 seed pearls. With antique fitted box.

English Victorian Amethyst Pearl and Diamond Cuff Bracelet

English Victorian silver-plated suite by Elkington & Co.

A suite of three English Victorian silver-plated objects by Elkington & Co. The suite comprises a pair of four-light candelabra and an epergne. Each candelabrum is decorated with three sphinxes that sit atop a splayed paw-footed platform. The stem and arms are adorned with a classic foliage decoration. The epergne is ornately decorated and accented with enamel work surrounding the "Three Graces;" daughters of Zeus who were said to represent youth, beauty, mirth and elegance. The graces presided over banquets and gatherings, to delight the guests of the gods. Elkington & Co. was founded by George Richards Elkington and his brother Henry Elkington in the 1830''s. The company, over the years, was very successful and known to be a prime producer of silver-plated objects. Elkington received various royal warrants of appointments including an appointment from the emperor of Austria.

English Victorian silver-plated suite by Elkington & Co.

Victorian Gold and Diamond ''Navette'' Ring

A Victorian 18 karat gold and diamond ring. The navette ring is composed of 15 old European-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of 1.75 carats, prong set, forming a marquise shape.

Victorian Gold and Diamond ''Navette'' Ring

Victorian Austro-Hungarian Etruscan Revival Necklace

An Austro-Hungarian Etruscan Revival 18 karat gold necklace. The necklace is composed of 20 wire and bead-work embellished amphora. In Italy, goldsmiths had been reviving the Etruscan Archeological-style jewelry unearthed at Pompeii and the Greek jewelry found in the Museo Bourbonico since the early years of the 19th century. Along with the Italian Etruscan Revival jewelry, archeological revival jewelry was also made in Vienna in the in style presented in the discovered hoards unearthed in the Crimea, such as this necklace. Archeological jewelry is extensively discussed in Antique and 20th Century Jewellery by Vivienne Becker and Victorian Jewelry Design by Charlotte Gere.

Victorian Austro-Hungarian Etruscan Revival Necklace