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Art Nouveau Bronze and Favrile Glass Table Candelabrum by Tiffany.

An American Art Nouveau patinated bronze and favrile glass mounted table candelabrum by Tiffany Studios New York. The candelabrum has six arms. Each candle holder is decorated with green favrile jewels. A similar candelabrum is pictured in: Alastair Duncan, "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models", Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club Ltd., 2007, p. 385, plate 1571.

Art Nouveau Bronze and Favrile Glass Table Candelabrum by Tiffany.

Tiffany Studios New York "Five-Light Lily" Wall Sconces

A pair of Tiffany Studios New York patinated bronze and favrile glass "Five-Light Lily" sconces. The five curved stems are spaced around the wall fixture. They terminate in gold lily-shaped shades. Similar sconces are pictured in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988, p. 351, plate 1454.

Tiffany Studios New York 'Five-Light Lily' Wall Sconces

Tiffany Studios New York Favrile Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York Favrile decorated vase. This vase features pulled copper decoration with iridescent gold trim against a golden ivory ground. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: "Louis C. Tiffany: Artist for the Ages" by Marilynn A. Johnson, London: Scala Publishers, Ltd., 2005, p. 229, cat. no. 131. Favrile is the trade name Tiffany gave to his blown art glass. The name derives from the Latin word fabrilis, meaning "made by hand." The technique was developed at Tiffany Furnaces in the mid-1890s using filaments from batches of differently colored glass and working the material while the glass was still molten. Ornamentation was added before the piece had its final shape, so that the decoration became fully integrated into the vessel. The technique was used in both decorative vases and functional pieces such as tableware (bowls, goblets, carafes) and lamp shades. Tiffany intended the favrile designation as a guarantee to current customers and future collectors of the fine quality of these objects.

Tiffany Studios New York  Favrile Vase

"Gentian" Tiffany Lamp

A Tiffany Studios New York "Gentian" table lamp. The shade is composed of leaded green, blue and white glass featuring floral stalks enclosed in Gothic arches. The middle row of the flaring apron is comprised of a row of uncut green gems. The patinated bronze base features openwork floral stalk decoration. This unique combination is rarely seen in Tiffany lamps. Pictured in: "The Lamps of Tiffany" by Egon Neustadt, p. 64, no. 90

'Gentian' Tiffany Lamp

Tiffany Studios New York Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York favrile vase with pulled decoration. The vase has an iridescent background graduating from opalescent through yellow and pink to orange, with dark red swirls. Favrile is the trade name Tiffany gave to his blown art glass. The name derives from the Latin word fabrilis, meaning "made by hand." The technique was developed at Tiffany Furnaces in the mid-1890s using filaments from batches of differently colored glass and working the material while the glass was still molten. Ornamentation was added before the piece had its final shape, so that the decoration became fully integrated into the vessel. The technique was used in both decorative vases and functional pieces such as tableware (bowls, goblets, carafes) and lamp shades. Tiffany intended the favrile designation as a guarantee to current customers and future collectors of the fine quality of these objects.

Tiffany Studios New York Vase

Tiffany Studios New York Glass Vase

An early Tiffany Studios New York favrile glass vase with pulled decoration. The vase features iridescent swirls in pinks and blues on a translucent pale brown background. Favrile is the trade name Tiffany gave to his blown art glass. The name derives from the Latin word fabrilis, meaning "made by hand." The technique was developed at the Tiffany Glass and Decorating Company in the mid-1890s using filaments from batches of differently colored glass and working the material while the glass was still molten. Ornamentation was added before the piece had its final shape, so that the decoration became fully integrated into the vessel. The technique was used in both decorative vases and functional pieces such as tableware (bowls, goblets, carafes) and lamp shades. Tiffany intended the favrile designation as a guarantee to current customers and future collectors of the fine quality of these objects. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: "Louis C. Tiffany: Artist for the Ages" by Marilynn A. Johnson, London: Scala Publishers, Ltd., 2005, p. 228, cat. 130. Also in the collection of the Victorian Albert Museum, documented in "Louis C. Tiffany: The Collected Works of Robert Koch," Atglen, PA: Schiffer, 2001, page 316.

Tiffany Studios New York Glass Vase

"Tulip" Tiffany Lamp

This exquisite Tiffany Studios "Tulip" table lamp features s brilliant red tulips with green leaves against a blue ground and sits atop a gilt bronze "Mock Turtle" base. Louis Comfort Tiffany first fell in love with the red tulip as a young man during his trips to the near east. While journeying through Persia and the Ottoman empire, Tiffany learned from his guide the lore and history of the Near East. Among his favorite stories was that of Farhad and Shirin, considered by many to be Persia''s Romeo and Juliet. The flowers are recreated with stunning realism. In some cases, all six petals of some of the blossoms can be seen. The tulips are ingeniously overlapped to create the illusion of depth. Because of the sky blue ground on the upper portion of the shade and the earthy tones present throughout the lower apron, one has the impression of gazing at a tulip bed on a sunny afternoon. The lamp base and shade are pictured separately in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models", by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antiques Collectors'' Club Ltd.: base, p. 110, cat. 454, base # 587; shade, p. 179, cat. 682, shade # 1546. A similar shade is also pictured in: "The Lamps of Tiffany", by Dr. Egon Neustadt, New York: The Fairfield Press, 1970, p. 150, plate 212.

'Tulip' Tiffany Lamp

"Counter Balance" Tiffany Lamp

A Tiffany Studios New York "Counter Balance" glass and bronze table lamp, featuring a green Favrile glass "Damascene" shade on a patinated turtleback counter balance base. A similar shade and base are pictured separately in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988. Shade: p. 87, plate 342; base: p. 87, plate 341.

'Counter Balance' Tiffany Lamp