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Art Nouveau pâte de verre "Masques" Vase by Gabriel Argy-Rousseau

A French Art Nouveau pâte de verre "Masques" vase by Gabriel Argy-Rousseau. The vase is decorated with two red masks that are framed in purple and green leaves. Provenance: Christie''s, New York, Important 20th Century Decorative Arts Including Works by Tiffany Studios, 13 June 2002, lot 39. A similar vase is pictured in J. Bloch-Dermont, Les Pâtes de Verre G. Argy-Rousseau Catalogue Raisonné, Paris, 1990, p. 178, no. 14.06.

Art Nouveau pâte de verre 'Masques' Vase by Gabriel Argy-Rousseau

Art Nouveau Covered Box by Alfred Daguet

The "Fish" Box by Alfred Daguet. This rare and stunning French Art Nouveau box is decorated with red enamel surrounding the fish swimming upon the top of the box. The fish''s fins are fully open displaying this creature''s innate beauty. Alfred-Louis-Achille Daguet (Paris, 1875-1942) is famed for his exquisite desk boxes which transform bronze, copper and glass into flowing, organic examples of the Art Nouveau style. Among colleagues as diverse Odilon Redon, the proto-surrealist, and Thomas Eakins, a father of American realism, Daguet studied painting under Jean-Léon Gérôme, the towering academician and outspoken adversary of everything Impressionist. Influenced by Gerôme''s compositions of dynamic tension and his scrupulous attention to life-like detail, by his early 20s Daguet had transferred his talents to Sigfried Bing''s famed gallery "L''Art Nouveau". There, in Bing''s studio above the shop on the rue de Provence, Daguet began creating his extraordinary bronze metalwork, often inlaid with copper panels as well as hardstone and glass cabochons, which Bing would then offer on the gallery floor alongside the objets d''art of Louis Tiffany, William Morris and Eugène Gaillard. This box is one in a series of square forms featuring profoundly integrated compositions portraying unusual predators, with their skins, spines and fins employed as unifying design elements. Created b ... y a masterly combination of repoussé and chasing, the fish''s high relief body rests upon a red ground. When the lid and front side are opened, a beautiful red leather interior is revealed. In 1905, when Bing closed his gallery, clients like Sandra Bernhardt and the Barrymore family simply followed Daguet to his new studio down by the Observatory in the 10th arrondissement. It was World War One that brought about a 12-year hiatus and transformation in Daguet''s career. Like Jean Després, he was recruited as an aviation designer and illustrator, earning the title of "true apostle of aerial art", while his work continued to evolve. Intriguing descriptions exist of a series of steel and bronze DESKS exhibited at the Galiera in 1926, suggesting Daguet embraced an Art Moderne aesthetic. Where are they now, and who will rediscover them? Until then, we are proud to share this rare and powerful artwork with our collectors. The "Fish" box is Daguet at his best, exhibiting masterful control of his materials of invention and articulating a clear and unyielding aesthetic vision. Similar boxes by Daguet are pictured in: The Paris Salons 1895-1915, Vol. V: Objects d''Art and Metalware, by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1999, pp. 202-203.

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Art Nouveau Covered Box by Alfred Daguet

"Three-Light Lily" Tiffany Lamp

A Tiffany Studios New York Favrile glass and patinated bronze Three-Light-Lily desk lamp. The lamp features three yellow pulled feather Favrile glass lily blossom shades suspended above a cushion base. Provenance: Private collection, Barbados A similar lamp is pictured in: Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models, by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988, p. 59, plate 211.

'Three-Light Lily' Tiffany Lamp

"Three-Light Piano Lily" Tiffany Lamp

A Tiffany Studios New York "Three-Light-Lily" glass and bronze piano lamp. The lamp features three golden Favrile glass shades suspended above a patinated bronze decorated "Artichoke" base. PROVENANCE: From a Los Angeles, CA Collection. A similar lamp is pictured in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988, p. 59, plate 212.

'Three-Light Piano Lily' Tiffany Lamp

Tiffany Studios New York Favrile Glass and Bronze "Harp" Floor Lamp

A Tiffany Studios New York glass and bronze table lamp featuring a green "Damascene" shade that sits atop a patinated bronze three-arm base. A similar shade is pictured in: Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models, by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988. Shade: p. 211, plate 827. A similar base is pictured on p. 63, plate 234.

Tiffany Studios New York Favrile Glass and Bronze 'Harp' Floor Lamp

Tiffany "Turtleback Ball" Desk Lamp

A Tiffany Studios New York "Turtleback Ball" desk lamp with favrile glass shade and patinated bronze base. The base features a long swing arm culminating in a single blue iridescent tulip shade with green highlights. The incredible balance between the beautiful, undulating weight of the turtleback glass in the piece''s base and the light, feathery iridescent shade creates a work that is, as a whole, quite complex and incredibly special among Tiffany''s oeuvre. A similar base and shade are pictured separately in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models, by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988. Sh"ade: p. 100, plate 396; base: p. 97, plate 382.

Tiffany  'Turtleback Ball' Desk Lamp

"Linenfold Counter Balance" Tiffany Lamp

A Tiffany Studios New York glass and bronze "Linenfold" table lamp, featuring a gold-colored leaded glass shade that resembles fabric, suspended from a gilt bronze "Counter-Balance" base. The leading on the shade is gold-colored to match the gilding on the base. A similar base and shade are pictured separately in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988. Shade: p. 112, plate 461; base: p. 89, plat 352.

'Linenfold Counter Balance' Tiffany Lamp

"Favrile" Tiffany Lamp

A Tiffany Studios New York "Damascene" Favrile glass and patinated bronze base. This "Damascene" table lamp is composed of transparent green, "Dychroide" glass and iridized glass combed decoration. Of particular note is the complexity of the iridization on the lamp that uses two distinct metallic oxides applied in two different techniques. Initially, a shell of transparent green glass was blown onto a core of opaque white glass core, forming the lamp''s white interior and thin transparent green exterior. Subsequently, "Dychroide" glass was carefully trailed twenty-nine times around the form. This particular variety of "Dychroide" glass, an innovation by Arthur J. Nash, production manager at the Tiffany Furnaces, has the unique quality of appearing green in reflected light and amber in transmitted light. This innovation gives a dynamic quality to Tiffany''s lamps that proved to be a true unification of form and function. When lit, the amber of the "Dychroide" glass causes the green to perceptually vibrate, further amplifying the effect of radiation in the lamp. The network of threads was subsequently marvered into the glass and evenly iridized with gold metallic oxides in the top half of the lamp and platinum metallic oxides in the bottom half of the lamp. Gold metal oxides that transition into strokes of platinum metallic oxides were then painted obliquely around the form. ... The piece was then blown and tooled into a dome shape. Evidence that the glass was first iridized then blown can be found in the subtle craquelure of the iridescence towards the base of the lamp. The double iridization creates a high luster and an added depth to the piece. A comb with twenty-nine teeth (equivalent to the number of "Dychroide" glass trails) was evenly raked through the semi-molten glass. The combing was purposefully offset from the trails so that they could still be seen in the final wave pattern. The green trails without "Dychroide" threads transmit the most light, creating a vivid amber starburst pattern when lit. The shade sits on a patinated bronze urn-shaped base with three arms supporting the shade. Provenance: Property from the Geyer Collection A similar base and shade are pictured separately in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988. Shade: p. 59, plate 209; base: p. 32, plate 89.

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'Favrile' Tiffany Lamp