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French Art Nouveau Bronze Vase by Korschann

A French Art Nouveau vase by Charles Korschann in gilt-bronze. The vase has a diamond-shaped base that tapers to a narrow rounded top, where it intersects with swirling stems and flower buds that form the handle, and features sculpted decoration in relief. On the front, we see a nude female figure emerging from a field of poppies with flowers in her long, flowing hair. The composition is all about movement and abundance, with the entire space carpeted in flowers and the maiden''s hair spilling out over the frame. The reverse, on the other hand, is more sedate and controlled, depicting a stylized arrangement of flower buds, stems and leaves in a structured, ordered composition, executed in a lower relief with thin incised lines echoing the shape of the three flower buds like ripples in the water. The vase combines many common motifs from Symbolist and Art Nouveau design: bats (shown in relief on the top), poppies and seductive women, or femmes fatales. Together, they evoke a mysterious dream-state, suggested in the identification of poppies with opiates and bats with the night.

French Art Nouveau Bronze Vase by Korschann

French Art Nouveau Flamed Sandstone Stoneware Planter by Bigot

A French Art Nouveau flamed sandstone stoneware planter by Alexander Bigot for the architect Cintrat, featuring an organic pattern that repeats itself around the base. This Art Nouveau architectural element by the ceramic artist Alexandre Bigot serves as an elegant and versatile planter. With its subtle "grès flammé (flamed sandstone) glaze, it is equally at home in an indoor alcove, planted with serene orchids, or situated on a terrace or garden''s edge, overflowing with white petunias and bright green trailing vines. Free the fancy of your inner gardener and fill it with your own botanical style of visual energy! Alexandre Bigot (1862-1927) had embarked upon a promising career in physics and chemistry, but was captivated by the displays of Chinese porcelains at the 1889 Exposition Universelle, and abandoned his profession to dedicate himself to the art of ceramics. For ten years, he experimented with pottery and glazes. His doctoral degree in chemistry helped him create a variety of matte glazes with novel effects, such as metallic lusters and crystalline surfaces. By 1900, growing in skill and confidence, he had participated in Siegfried Bing''s inaugural exhibition at La Maison de l''Art Nouveau, and had won a grand prize at the turn-of-the-century Exposition Universelle. However, by the late 1890s Bigot was becoming fascinated by a new medium for artistic expression ... in ceramics: the ground-breaking architecture and interiors of the Art Nouveau geniuses, among them Hector Guimard and Louis Majorelle. Excitement about this new style of architecture grew, as beautiful and original structures rose to relieve the homogeneity of Parisian Second Empire facades. Bigot re-envisioned and expanded his Paris manufacturing studio in order to contribute to this exciting new wave, helping to realize the architects'' vision in a variety of ways. His versatile ceramics, and his aptitude for collaborating closely with the artists and architects, helped fully realize this sculptural, plastic style of architecture, with its sense of free composition. His work product ranged from façade revetments to high relief floral, foliate and figural decorative motifs, from bespoke tilework designs to ceramic "masonry" with the appearance of carved, weathered stone. Bigot''s innovations were key to the construction of a number of famous and truly revolutionary Art Nouveau apartment houses and villas, prize-winning structures some of which fortunately survive. His first important success was decoration of the façade and breezeway of the celebrated Castel Beranger, whose architect Hector Guimard designed the famous Paris metro entrances. Bigot also collaborated with architect Henri Sauvage on Louis Majorelle''s renowned villa, where his ceramic panels, fireplace and other design flourishes helped generate the structure''s wider influence on architecture and interior design. For the architect Jules Lavirotte, Bigot, in cooperation with a number of artists, produced the artist-designed tiles and sculpture incorporated into the opulent façade of 29 Avenue Rapp, situated near the Tour Eiffel. One of the most acclaimed surviving Art Nouveau buildings in Paris, this was a revolutionary structure which explored new technologies, including sound proofing and ultralight iron-reinforced concrete. Most importantly, its complex façade harmoniously unifies the work of collaborating artists, realized by Bigot. Architectural critics consider the building to be strongly sculptural in itself. Always adapting to the evolving ideas of avant-garde architects, Bigot later created a sophisticated series of bespoke façade elements for 25bis Rue Franklin, a proto-modernist apartment house in the 16th, just across the Seine from the Tour Eiffel. The structure was the first to expose and assert the skeleton framework of the building as the defining architectural design, and Bigot''s work was used to highlight this novel vision. Its façade is covered with his myriad, hand-set ceramic forms, including chestnut leaves, small disks and interlocking fish scales in subtly varied hues and tones, that read from a distance as monumental vertical panels in beige, cream and yellow. The building was greatly admired by Le Courbusier. As the taste for the Art Nouveau faded, and since the artistic projects to which his business was geared did not tend to reward financially, Bigot''s enterprise was forced to close in 1914, but his astonishing work can still be admired throughout Paris and at the Villa Majorelle in Nancy, the birthplace of Art Nouveau.

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French Art Nouveau Flamed Sandstone Stoneware Planter by Bigot

Bronze Figural Jardiniere by Marionnet

A French Art Nouveau patinated bronze figural jardiniere by Alfred Marionnet. The body of the jardinere is decorated with a nude female embracing the vessel. The woman''s naked feed extend beyond the jardinere''s curving form. The vessel is also decorated with branches that have leaves and berries in relief. The rim of the jardinere is encircled by entwined branches.

Bronze Figural Jardiniere by Marionnet

"Chalmont" planter by Hector Guimard

A French ceramic planter, known as "Chalmont," by Hector Guimard . The planter features a blue interior with stylized handles with gold highlights. The exterior is glazed in dark brown. A similar planter is featured in: Philippe Guimard Thiébaut edition of the Réunion des Musées Nationaux, Paris, 1992. Model reproduced on pages 258 and 262.

'Chalmont' planter by Hector Guimard

"Chalmont" planter by Hector Guimard

A French Art Nouveau green ceramic planter known, as "Chalmont," by Hector Guimard. The planter features a blue interior with stylized gold-highlighted handles. A similar planter is featured in: Philippe Guimard Thiébaut edition of the Réunion des Musées Nationaux, Paris, 1992. Model reproduced on pages 258 and 262.

'Chalmont' planter by Hector Guimard

French Art Nouveau Bronze Planter "Chrysalide" by Berthoud

A French Art Nouveau patinated bronze planter, "Chrysalide" (Chrisalis), by Paul-François Berthoud, featuring the head of a woman emerging from foliage. The crest of the planter is further adorned by a repeating floral motif. Pictured in: "The Paris Salons 1895-1914, Volume V: Objets D'' Art & Metalware," page 86, by Alistair Duncan, The Antique Collectors'' Club, 1999 and in "Dynamic Beauty: Sculpture of Art Nouveau Paris," by Macklowe Gallery, The Studley Press, 2011, p. 55.

French Art Nouveau Bronze Planter 'Chrysalide' by Berthoud

French Art Deco Charger by Claudius Linossier

A rare French Art Deco Charger by Claudius Linossier. This plate is comprised of hammered copper and brass with geometric concentric and triangular silver patina on a nuanced anthracite background patinated over fire. The central symbol is an estoile rayonnante, or radiant star, a sixteen wavy-rayed sun ubiquitous to Medieval heraldry. The star was considered a symbol of honor. Claudius Linossier (1893-1953) was a highly important French Art Deco metal artist who chose to work in the very old and very difficult technique of dinanderie, which involved decorating hand-raised copper vessels with specially-made metal oxides that were hammered into the surface, and, when heated, produced subtle and beautiful colors. For more information about Linossier and this technique, have a look at our bio of him. His pieces can be found in many museums and private collections.

French Art Deco Charger by Claudius Linossier

Tiffany Studios "Marsh Marigold" Planter

A Tiffany Studios bronze "Marsh Marigold" planter, featuring a repeating pattern of marsh marigold leaves and vines around the gilt bronze base. The marsh marigold was included in one of the first four "Dragonfly" lamps made in April, 1899, entitled "Dragonfly and Water Flowers." The lamp was a collaboration between the female designers Clara Driscoll and Alice Carmen Gouvy. Gouvy, who would later design for the Metalwork and Enameling Department created this breathtaking naturalistic design. The planter has faint reddish enameling in the design to give the illusion of a fierce sunset peeking through a dense underbrush. The truly organic shape of the leaves featured is highlighted by the undulating modeling of their forms. Identical model planter pictured in "Louis C. Tiffany''s Glass - Bronzes - Lamps: A complete collector''s guide", by Robert Koch, page 224.

Tiffany Studios 'Marsh Marigold' Planter