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French Art Nouveau Gilt Bronze Clock by Dufrène

A French Art Nouveau clock in gilt bronze by Maurice Dufrène with dancing figures modeled by Félix Voulot for the Parisian atelier La Maison Moderne. A similar model of this clock is part of the permanent collection of the Museum fur Kunst und Gewerbe, Hamburg. Signed, "F. Voulot 1900". Pictured in The Paris Salons: 1895-1914, Volume V: Objects d''Art & Metalware, by Alastair Duncan, pages 38 and 227. Also pictured in L''Ofevrerie et Le Bronze, L''Art Decoratif, by Charles Torquet, page 207.

French Art Nouveau Gilt Bronze Clock by Dufrène

Marcus & Co. Art Nouveau 18kt Gold Black Opal and Enamel Stick Pin

This miniature representation of Renaissance Revival within the Art Nouveau period is set with a square black opal cabochon whose indigo and brilliant green swathes of color are echoed in its glowing enamel surround, highlighted by fleur-de-lis and scrolls. It would make a superb addition to any gentleman''s stick pin collection, or a glamorous gift for a showjumping or hunting equestrian to use as a stock tie pin. The multi-generational New York firm of Marcus & Co was founded by an ambitious young German immigrant who had trained with a prominent court jeweler in Dresden. In 1892, after working with Charles Lewis Tiffany, Hermann Marcus and his sons William and George together set up a business that soon became a glittering New York society institution renowned not only for its superb diamonds, colored stones and pearls, but also its instantly recognizable, original design style. The firm produced great jewels in the Art Nouveau and Arts & Crafts sensibility, with George, the artist/designer, drawing inspiration from sources as diverse as the contemporary French masters, the Moghuls and Maharajahs, the garland style of the Ancien Regime, and the genius of Renaissance goldsmiths. George''s distinctive, confident hand was always discernible in Marcus creations. Working as a team with George, William was a gem and pearl connoisseur who travelled the world hunting for exceptiona ... l gem material, including purchasing the entire production of never-before-seen black opal from Lightning Ridge Australia in 1908. Marcus exhibited at the 1900 Exposition Universelle in Paris, and their work won prizes from the prestigious Society of Arts & Crafts of Boston. Plique-à-jour enamel was an art in which the firm excelled. Displaying a mastery equal to that of the French artists, they created jewels with unprecedented three-dimensional depth in this medium. The firm and family were well-known for their charitable activities and promotion of young jewelers such as Raymond Yard. The firm''s jewelry is a focus of the collection of the American Wing at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

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Marcus & Co. Art Nouveau 18kt Gold Black Opal and Enamel Stick Pin

Louis Zorra Art Nouveau Diamond, Amethyst, Pearl and Plique-à-Jour Enamel Brooch

An Art Nouveau 18 karat gold and plique à jour brooch with diamond, amethysts and pearl by Louis Zorra. The brooch has an old mine-cut diamond with an approximate total weight of .65 carat, 21 round bezel-set amethysts with an approximate total weight of 1.10 carats, and a hanging, enamel-capped pearl. Similar pictured in "Imperishable Beauty Art Nouveau Jewelry", by Yvonne J. Markowitz and Elyse Zorn Karlin, "MFA Publications Museum of Fine Arts", Boston, 2008, pages 8 and 68. "Zorra was possibly born in Italy, working in Paris during the Art Nouveau period)...he moved to Paris from Asti, Italy, and exhibited at the Salon des artistes français, receiving an honorable mention in 1902." Markowitz and Karlin in Imperishable Beauty, pg. 151.

Louis Zorra Art Nouveau Diamond, Amethyst, Pearl and Plique-à-Jour Enamel Brooch

Marcus & Co. Art Nouveau 18kt Gold, Peridot, Diamond, Enamel Ring

This distinctive ring epitomizes Marcus & Co.''s liberal interpretation of Renaissance jewelry forms, fluidly merged with the Art Nouveau aesthetic of which the firm, along with Tiffany, was a leading American proponent. The flowing gold form, masterfully textured with Marcus''s unmistakable style of chasing and engraving, is enhanced with vibrant green enamel over a prepared ground that offers subtle shading and depth of color. Twinstone rings were first popularized in the late 18th century, when a young Napoleon presented Josephine with a so-called "toi et moi" engagement ring, the first of many historic jewelry gifts from the future emperor to the stylish widow he passionately loved. The ring is enhanced by two round-cut peridots totaling approximately 1.60 carats, and 30 round-cut diamonds that weigh approximately 1.20 carats. The green basse-taille enamel continues around the shank, which is enhanced at the reverse by a diamond. The multi-generational New York firm of Marcus & Co was founded by an ambitious young German immigrant who had trained with a prominent court jeweler in Dresden. In 1892, after working with Charles Lewis Tiffany, Hermann Marcus and his sons William and George together set up a business that soon became a glittering New York society institution renowned not only for its superb diamonds, colored stones and pearls, but also its instantly recognizabl ... e, original design style. The firm produced great jewels in the Art Nouveau and Arts & Crafts sensibility, with George, the artist/designer, drawing inspiration from sources as diverse as the contemporary French masters, the Moghuls and Maharajahs, the garland style of the Ancien Regime, and the genius of Renaissance goldsmiths. George''s distinctive, confident hand was always discernible in Marcus creations. Working as a team with George, William was a gem and pearl connoisseur who travelled the world hunting for exceptional gem material, including purchasing the entire production of never-before-seen black opal from Lightning Ridge Australia in 1908. Marcus exhibited at the 1900 Exposition Universelle in Paris, and their work won prizes from the prestigious Society of Arts & Crafts of Boston. Plique-à-jour enamel was an art in which the firm excelled. Displaying a mastery equal to that of the French artists, they created jewels with unprecedented three-dimensional depth in this medium. The firm and family were well-known for their charitable activities and promotion of young jewelers such as Raymond Yard. The firm''s jewelry is a focus of the collection of the American Wing at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

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Marcus & Co. Art Nouveau 18kt Gold, Peridot, Diamond, Enamel Ring

Okrant et Davidonniez Paris Art Deco Diamond and Platinum Wide Bracelet

A French Art Deco platinum bracelet with diamonds by Okrant et Davidonniez. The flexible open work bracelet has 512 European-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of 38.00 carats, 2 larger diamonds with an approximate total weight of 2.00 carats, and 2 smaller flanking diamonds with an approximate total weight of 1.00 carat, VS clarity, G/H/I color grade. With original box. The Okrant et Davidonniez workshop was located in Paris at 64 rue Lafayette. They produced jewelry for all the Place Vendôme fine jewelry houses, such as Van Cleef & Arpels, Cartier, Mauboussin, and Boucheron. The firm closed in 1939. Exhibited at "Anything Goes: The Jazz Age" at the Nassau County Museum of Art, 24 March 2018 - 8 July 2018. Similar bracelets are pictured in Art Deco Jewelry, by Sylvie Raulet, Rizzoli, 1984, page 84, 154.

Okrant et Davidonniez Paris Art Deco Diamond and Platinum Wide Bracelet

Kohn Art Deco Diamond, Ruby, Emerald and Lapis Lazuli Jardiniere Brooch

An Art Deco platinum and gold brooch with diamonds, ruby, emerald and lapis lazuli by Kohn. The brooch has 38 round-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of 1.20 carats, with ruby and emerald accents. The base of the jardiniere is formed of a single piece of lapis lazuli banded with red and black enamel. Exhibited at "Anything Goes: The Jazz Age" at the Nassau County Museum of Art, 24 March 2018 - 8 July 2018.

Kohn Art Deco Diamond, Ruby, Emerald and Lapis Lazuli Jardiniere Brooch

E. M. Gattle & Co. Art Deco Diamond and Platinum Brooch

An American Art Deco platinum brooch with diamonds by E. M. Gattle & Co.. The brooch has 168 old European-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of 4.50 carats, and 5 square-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of .75 carat. The total approximate diamond weight of the brooch is 5.25 carats, H/I color, VS clarity. The brooch centers on a dimensional jardinière flanked by pierced foliate elements with a milgrain set diamond border. E.M. Gattle Co. was founded by Emanuel Gattle in the latter part of the 19th century. Originally, E.M. Gattle & Co. was located on Broadway in the theatre district. In 1907, the company moved to the corner of 38th Street and Fifth Avenue and, later, to 55th Street and Fifth Avenue, next to the St. Regis Hotel. One of their notable customers was Enrico Caruso, who shopped Gattle stores for jewelry. However, he was not only a shopper of Gattle, he also allowed his name and photograph to be used in Gattle advertising. Gattle became successful until the time they closed their doors. The firm closed in 1940, a year before the outbreak of World War II. Exhibited at "Anything Goes: The Jazz Age" at the Nassau County Museum of Art, 24 March 2018 - 8 July 2018.

E. M. Gattle & Co. Art Deco Diamond and Platinum Brooch

Petite Coupe Sur in Enamel and Gold by Thesmar

Petite coupe sur talon in enamel and 18 karat gold by André Fernand Thesmar (1843–1912). In original box. André Fernand Thesmar (1843-1912) was a French enameler. He is credited with bringing the soft-paste porcelain back into style, alongside sections with gold foil backings, in the 20th century. He also used the method of plique-à-jour, including works that were often inspired by Japanese and Chinese enameling. He showed his work at the 1900 Paris Exposition Universelle. The floral motifs that adorn this petite coupe sur talon by André Thesmar appear to float due to the expert use of plique-à-jour, a type of enamel that has no backing so that light can shine through it like leaded glass. Thesmar''s ability to create such an exceptional piece in gold and enamel shows a combination of artistry and technical genius that is very rare to come by. A similar coupe sur talon is in the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.

Petite Coupe Sur in Enamel and Gold by Thesmar