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Tiffany Glass and Bronze "Dragonfly" Chandelier

A Tiffany Studios New York "Dragonfly" glass and bronze chandelier. This elegant chandelier is composed of a choice selection of glass, which makes this an exceptional example of Tiffany''s iconic dragonfly lamp. The dragonflies are composed of dark green glass bodies, variegated blue glass wings and red glass eyes. The cabochon glass jewels that surround this chandelier depict emeralds, sapphires and topaz. The two top and three bottom borders are made up of various colors of rippled glass. This exciting glass composition rests upon a ground of green, green/blue and brown glass. While Tiffany was largely credited for his company''s glass innovations during his lifetime, recent archival research has shed light on the unsung heroes behind his genius. Two such figures were responsible for the astounding effects of this dragonfly lamp: Tiffany had gone through four chemists before he landed on Arthur J Nash, a chemist previously employed at the White House Glass Works in Stourbridge. England. It was Nash''s formulas, developed from before his employment at Tiffany, that became the core of Tiffany''s palette. Nash was no stranger to experimentation, adding unconventional materials such as birch bark and burnt oats to create his amber glass. Clara Driscoll, head of the Tiffany Studios Women''s Glass Cutting Department, designed the dragonfly lamp, earning much acclaim for h ... er artistic prowess in her time. (For more information on her work see "A New Light on Tiffany: Clara Driscoll and the Tiffany Girls," by Martine Eidelberg, Nina Gray, and Margaret K. Hofer, 2007.) Louis Comfort Tiffany''s "Dragonfly" lamps have become so iconic and loved because the artisans who made them were not limited in color as they were when making floral and geometric shades. We can imagine that the dragonflies that adorn the lower edge of the shade are flying low across a verdant field. Similar chandeliers are pictured in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988, p. 230, plate 891-893.

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Tiffany Glass and Bronze 'Dragonfly' Chandelier

"Geometric Brick" Tiffany Chandelier

A Tiffany Studios New York "Geometric" leaded glass and bronze chandelier. The green- and sunset-hued mottled glass shade features a geometric "brick" pattern. The shade hangs from a patinated bronze suspension. A similar hanging shade is pictured in: Alastair Duncan, "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models," Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club Ltd., 2007, p. 310, plate 1244.

'Geometric Brick' Tiffany Chandelier

"Geometric Brick" Tiffany Chandelier

A Tiffany Studios New York leaded glass and bronze "Geometric" chandelier. The glass shade features a geometric "brick" pattern and is decorated in hues of green, flame orange and amber mottled glass. The shade hangs from a patinated bronze suspension. A similar hanging shade is pictured in: Alastair Duncan, "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models," Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club Ltd., 2007, p. 310, plate 1244.

'Geometric Brick' Tiffany Chandelier

"Jonquil-Daffodil" Tiffany Lamp

A Tiffany Studios New York gilt bronze and Favrile glass "Jonquil-Daffodil" lamp featuring a dome-shaped shade divided into an upper section comprising sixteen downturned trumpet narcissi blossoms in mottled yellow and creamy white colored glass surrounded by mottled blue and green colored stems against a mottled blue, green and blue geometric band.The lower section is decorated with three undulating rows comprising forty-eight daffodil blossoms, with opalescent and creamy white colored petals and yellow orange centers, continuing to a mottled green and blue geometric border. The shade rests upon a gilt bronze "Twisted Vine" base. Daffodils and narcissi were the most abundant flower on Louis Comfort Tiffany''s 600-acre estate. They were notably the only flowers that Tiffany''s children and grandchildren could freely pick, as Tiffany had thousands growing wild on the grounds. Comfort Tiffany Gilder, one of Tiffany''s twin daughters, revealed in her 1962 poem Daffodils that, "in the spring the children (her brother and sisters) would run to the daffodils. Stop first to gaze with rapture, then darting here and there ... slowly picking daffodils one by one." This stunning Tiffany Studios "Daffodil and Narcissus" lamp features an upper section of sixteen downturned daffodils and a lower section of forty-eight narcissi. The bright yellow daffodils that encircle the top were of t ... he King Alfred variety, a new cultivar in Tiffany''s time. The bottom section consisted of narcissus poeticus, the narcissi of ancient greek mythology. The pairing of the two flower varieties mirrors the type of artistry Tiffany brought to America, a marriage of beauty old and new. Pictured in "The Lamps of Tiffany" by Egon Neustadt, page 143. A similar base is pictured in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988. base: p. 94, plates 373-374.

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'Jonquil-Daffodil' Tiffany Lamp

Tiffany Studios "Geometric" Table Lamp

A Tiffany Studios New York "Geometric" leaded glass and patinated bronze table lamp. The mottled green, yellow and gold glass geometric shade is enhanced by a band of gold iridescent "Geometric" tiles and rests upon an adjustable, patinated bronze, Cat''s Paw base, A similar shade and base are pictured separately in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988. Shade: p. 145, plate 608; base: p. 82, plate 316.

Tiffany Studios 'Geometric' Table Lamp

"Mandarin" Tiffany Lamp

A Tiffany Studios New York "Mandarin" table lamp. The leaded glass shade, graduates from green to white, on a patinated bronze base designed to accompany the shade. The lamp''s design demonstrates Tiffany''s love of both Oriental curiosity and the natural world. Accordingly, the structure of the shade is meant to resemble both a Japanese parasol and conical straw hat. Like many curiosity collectors of the Aesthetic movement, Tiffany incorporated the items in his collection into his daily life. Tiffany''s family regularly brought oversized Japanese parasols to the beach in his Oyster Bay home. Both the parasol and conical hat protect their wearers from rain, a quality shared with the lotus leaf. The lamp is considered among the most architecturally complex of Tiffany lamps. The Green Lotus leaf shade, probably designed between 1902 and 1914 by a Tiffany Studio designer and approved by Louis Comfort Tiffany himself, is often considered a transition between the decidedly more geometric designs and predominantly floral shades. A similar lamp was used to decorate the living room at Falling Water, the famous Frank Lloyd Wright-designed home in rural Pennsylvania. Its seamless incorporation into a home as modern as Wright''s is a testament to the timeless of Tiffany. The lamp is featured in the permanent collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, MOMA, Cornell University, and ... the Minneapolis Institute of Art Pictured in, The "Lost" Treasures of Louis Comfort Tiffany, by Hugh F. McKean, figure 197.

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'Mandarin' Tiffany Lamp