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Louis Zorra Art Nouveau Diamond, Amethyst, Pearl and Plique-à-Jour Enamel Brooch

An Art Nouveau 18 karat gold and plique à jour brooch with diamond, amethysts and pearl by Louis Zorra. The brooch has an old mine-cut diamond with an approximate total weight of .65 carat, 21 round bezel-set amethysts with an approximate total weight of 1.10 carats, and a hanging, enamel-capped pearl. Similar pictured in "Imperishable Beauty Art Nouveau Jewelry", by Yvonne J. Markowitz and Elyse Zorn Karlin, "MFA Publications Museum of Fine Arts", Boston, 2008, pages 8 and 68. "Zorra was possibly born in Italy, working in Paris during the Art Nouveau period)...he moved to Paris from Asti, Italy, and exhibited at the Salon des artistes français, receiving an honorable mention in 1902." Markowitz and Karlin in Imperishable Beauty, pg. 151.

Louis Zorra Art Nouveau Diamond, Amethyst, Pearl and Plique-à-Jour Enamel Brooch

Okrant et Davidonniez Paris Art Deco Diamond and Platinum Wide Bracelet

A French Art Deco platinum bracelet with diamonds by Okrant et Davidonniez. The flexible open work bracelet has 512 European-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of 38.00 carats, 2 larger diamonds with an approximate total weight of 2.00 carats, and 2 smaller flanking diamonds with an approximate total weight of 1.00 carat, VS clarity, G/H/I color grade. With original box. The Okrant et Davidonniez workshop was located in Paris at 64 rue Lafayette. They produced jewelry for all the Place Vendôme fine jewelry houses, such as Van Cleef & Arpels, Cartier, Mauboussin, and Boucheron. The firm closed in 1939. Exhibited at "Anything Goes: The Jazz Age" at the Nassau County Museum of Art, 24 March 2018 - 8 July 2018. Similar bracelets are pictured in Art Deco Jewelry, by Sylvie Raulet, Rizzoli, 1984, page 84, 154.

Okrant et Davidonniez Paris Art Deco Diamond and Platinum Wide Bracelet

Marcus & Co. Early-20th Century Diamond, Natural Pearl, Platinum and Gold Ring

An American Early 20th Century platinum and 18 karat gold ring with diamonds and natural pearl by Marcus & Co. The ring has 3 old mine-cut diamonds with an approximate weight of 1.25, 1.35 and 1.05 carats, L/M color, SI clarity respectively, and 10 old European-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of .10 carat. The center of this ring is a natural pearl measuring 7.91 x 7.86 mm. Gemological Institute of America Certificate stating natural saltwater pearl #2155277139. The multi-generational New York firm of Marcus & Co was founded by an ambitious young German immigrant who had trained at a prominent Dresden court jeweler. In 1892, after working with Charles Lewis Tiffany, Hermann Marcus and his sons William and George together set up a business that soon became a glittering New York society institution renowned not only for its superb diamonds, colored stones and pearls, but also its instantly recognizable, original design style. The firm produced great jewels in the Art Nouveau and Arts & Crafts sensibility, with George, the artist/designer, drawing inspiration from sources as diverse and exotic as the contemporary French masters, the Moghuls and Maharajahs, the garland style of the Ancien Regime, and the genius of Renaissance goldsmiths. George''s distinctive, confident hand was always discernible in Marcus creations. Working as a team with George, his brother Wil ... liam was a gem and pearl connoisseur who travelled the world hunting fine gem material, including purchasing the entire production of never-before-seen black opal in Lightning Ridge Australia in 1908. Marcus exhibited at the 1900 Exposition Universelle in Paris, and their work won prizes at the prestigious Society of Arts & Crafts of Boston. Plique-a-jour enamel was an art in which Marcus & Co. excelled, creating jewels with unprecedented three-dimensional depth in this medium. The firm and family were well-known for their charitable activities and promotion of young jewelers such as Raymond Yard.

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Marcus & Co. Early-20th Century Diamond, Natural Pearl, Platinum and Gold Ring

Tiffany Studios New York Favrile Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York Favrile decorated vase. This vase features pulled copper decoration with iridescent gold trim against a golden ivory ground. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: "Louis C. Tiffany: Artist for the Ages" by Marilynn A. Johnson, London: Scala Publishers, Ltd., 2005, p. 229, cat. no. 131. Favrile is the trade name Tiffany gave to his blown art glass. The name derives from the Latin word fabrilis, meaning "made by hand." The technique was developed at Tiffany Furnaces in the mid-1890s using filaments from batches of differently colored glass and working the material while the glass was still molten. Ornamentation was added before the piece had its final shape, so that the decoration became fully integrated into the vessel. The technique was used in both decorative vases and functional pieces such as tableware (bowls, goblets, carafes) and lamp shades. Tiffany intended the favrile designation as a guarantee to current customers and future collectors of the fine quality of these objects.

Tiffany Studios New York  Favrile Vase

Tiffany Studios New York Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York favrile vase with pulled decoration. The vase has an iridescent background graduating from opalescent through yellow and pink to orange, with dark red swirls. Favrile is the trade name Tiffany gave to his blown art glass. The name derives from the Latin word fabrilis, meaning "made by hand." The technique was developed at Tiffany Furnaces in the mid-1890s using filaments from batches of differently colored glass and working the material while the glass was still molten. Ornamentation was added before the piece had its final shape, so that the decoration became fully integrated into the vessel. The technique was used in both decorative vases and functional pieces such as tableware (bowls, goblets, carafes) and lamp shades. Tiffany intended the favrile designation as a guarantee to current customers and future collectors of the fine quality of these objects.

Tiffany Studios New York Vase

Tiffany Studios New York Glass Vase

An early Tiffany Studios New York favrile glass vase with pulled decoration. The vase features iridescent swirls in pinks and blues on a translucent pale brown background. Favrile is the trade name Tiffany gave to his blown art glass. The name derives from the Latin word fabrilis, meaning "made by hand." The technique was developed at the Tiffany Glass and Decorating Company in the mid-1890s using filaments from batches of differently colored glass and working the material while the glass was still molten. Ornamentation was added before the piece had its final shape, so that the decoration became fully integrated into the vessel. The technique was used in both decorative vases and functional pieces such as tableware (bowls, goblets, carafes) and lamp shades. Tiffany intended the favrile designation as a guarantee to current customers and future collectors of the fine quality of these objects. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: "Louis C. Tiffany: Artist for the Ages" by Marilynn A. Johnson, London: Scala Publishers, Ltd., 2005, p. 228, cat. 130. Also in the collection of the Victorian Albert Museum, documented in "Louis C. Tiffany: The Collected Works of Robert Koch," Atglen, PA: Schiffer, 2001, page 316.

Tiffany Studios New York Glass Vase

Tiffany Studios New York Favrile Glass Vase

A Louis Comfort Tiffany favrile glass "Red Hooked Feather" vase, featuring a rich red color enhanced by an iridescent multicolored pulled feather motif that encircles the vase. Favrile is the trade name Tiffany gave to his blown art glass. The name derives from the Latin word fabrilis, meaning "made by hand." The technique was developed at the Tiffany Glass and Decorating Company in the mid-1890s using filaments from batches of differently colored glass and working the material while the glass was still molten. Ornamentation was added before the piece had its final shape, so that the decoration became fully integrated into the vessel. The technique was used in both decorative vases and functional pieces such as tableware (bowls, goblets, carafes) and lamp shades. Tiffany intended the favrile designation as a guarantee to current customers and future collectors of the fine quality of these objects.

Tiffany Studios New York Favrile Glass Vase

French Art Nouveau cameo glass vase by Émile Gallé

A French Art Nouveau cameo glass vase by Émile Gallé. This large vase is decorated with wheel carved purple trumpet-creepers and vines against a green background. The flowers and vines climb up the ribbed neck of the vase. The "liseron" vase is a flattened baluster form vase with an everted mouth, rounded and polished rim, long slender-waisted neck, short globular body, and an applied disk foot. The vase features an intercalaire layer of coarse jade frit in the top three-quarters of the vase and fine indigo frit in the bottom quarter of the vase. To construct the vase, a bubble was blown into the gather, which was cased and parison inflated into a dip mold with 19 ribs. The stem was subsequently plucked out and twisted counterclockwise. Finally, a soffieta was used to open the mouth and a pair of jacks was used to evert the rim. The vase was later cameo cut with exquisite detailing in the venation and the hirsute texture of the leaves. The vase depicts eight heads of Liseron japonais (Ipomoea nil ([Japanese morning glory].) The flower was introduced to Nancy by Takashima Hokkai, a fellow member of the Ecole de Nancy and Japanese Director of Forestry. Hokkai was invited as a juror for the Central Nancy Horticultural society exhibition of 1887. At the exhibition, Gallé presented Hokkai a Japanese morning glory in thanks for his contributions to the field of horticulture. ... The Japanese morning glory adorned the walls of Gallé''s studio until his death in 1904. To accompany this oriental flower, Gallé has given the morning glories a jade background. Commonly featured in the eighteenth century Shigemasa Kitao birds and flower prints that Gallé consulted, the creation of a jade simulant is only fitting for this oriental flower.

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French Art Nouveau cameo glass vase by Émile Gallé