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Art Nouveau Bronze and Favrile Glass Table Candelabrum by Tiffany.

An American Art Nouveau patinated bronze and favrile glass mounted table candelabrum by Tiffany Studios New York. The candelabrum has six arms. Each candle holder is decorated with green favrile jewels. A similar candelabrum is pictured in: Alastair Duncan, "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models", Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club Ltd., 2007, p. 385, plate 1571.

Art Nouveau Bronze and Favrile Glass Table Candelabrum by Tiffany.

French Art Nouveau "Pivoines" Table Lamp by Émile Gallé

A French Art Nouveau "Pivoines" table lamp by Émile Gallé. The lamp features a vibrant detailed decoration of crimson red peonies wrapped around the base and shade, surrounded by foliage of plum-colored leaves. The patinated bronze mounts replicate the foliage theme and have scarab beetle terminals. A similar lamp is pictured in A. Duncan, G. de Bartha, "Gallé Le Verre," London, 1984, p. 153, pl. 214.

French Art Nouveau 'Pivoines' Table Lamp by Émile Gallé

Bronze Art Nouveau Figural Candelabrum by Gustav Gurschner

A polychrome bronze Art Nouveau figural candelabrum by Gustav Gurschner. A young woman with brown hair, dressed in a long flowing green skirt, with her breasts exposed, holds a seed capsule in each arm, into which a candle can be inserted. Gurschner displayed his work through the Viennese Secession Group gaining him much acclaim. His depiction of bare breasted women largely survives any stricture in that they have a quiet dignity and poetic charm that never stoops to vulgarization. The woman holds in each arm a lotus flower seed capsule. The size of the capsules relative to her body makes her seem a flower fairy or spirit. A candle would be placed on each capsule, illuminating the dinner table with spectacular charm. In the lead up to World War I, Germany was swept by a wave of artistic nationalism. After spending most of the 19th century dominated by French influence, German artists desired a return to tradition. Integral to German tradition was the vibrant color of Late Medieval wooden sculpture. Since the 14th century, much of antique polychromy had deteriorated considerably, leaving large portions of the wood base exposed. The rich burnt sienna of this woman''s skin may refer to this exposed wood finish. Alternatively it might refer to the skin color of the dancers from the Java Pavillion (1889). After their blockbuster appearance in the World''s Fair, depictions of the d ... ancers abounded in salons. Brown-skinned and black-haired women became appreciated in this context as harbingers of exotic delights. A similar candlestick is pictured in: "The Paris Salons 1895-1915, Vol. V: Objects d''Art and Metalware," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1999, p. 305 Provenance Rudi Schmutz, Vienna Acquired from the above by the present owner, circa 1980s Literature Alastair Duncan, Art Nouveau Sculpture, New York, 1978, p. 49 Wolf Uecker, Art Nouveau and Art Deco Lamps and Candlesticks, New York, 1986, p. 15 Yvonne Brunhammer and Suzanne Tise, French Decorative Art, the Société des Artistes Décorateurs 1900-1942, Paris, 1990, p. 8 (for the model depicted in the Manuel Orazi poster)

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Bronze Art Nouveau Figural Candelabrum by Gustav Gurschner

"Eighteen-Light Lily" Tiffany Table Lamp

A Tiffany Studios New York glass and bronze eighteen light "Lily" table lamp, featuring 18 golden iridescent Favrile glass "Lily" shades on individual bronze stems extending upwards from an intricately sculpted and detailed gilt bronze "Lily Pad" base. This exquisite eighteen light lily lamp marks the combination of two of Tiffany''s favorite floral motifs, the pond lily, and the morning glory. Ths shades take the form of morning glories. Inspired by Japanese woodblock prints, Tiffany made many water-color paintings of morning glories, entranced by their polychromatic brilliance and trumpet-like shape. The morning glory or asagao was beloved by the Japanese as the commoner''s flower. Day laborers, artisans and many other persons who could not indulge in the aristocratic pleasure of raising dwarf trees or chrysanthemums, eagerly became asagao cultivators. The asagao blooms at dawn before the sun rises, and consequently, asagao lovers have to rise early in order to appreciate the blossoms. Like the morning glory rises to the sun, so does this lamp come alive with the addition of light. The gilt bronze "pond lily" base is modeled after the lilies at Laurelton Hall, Tiffany''s Long Island garden estate. Tiffany cultivated the Latour-Marliac Lily, the world''s first colored water-lilies. It was these very same lilies that inspired the likes of Monet in his famous water-lily seri ... es. A similar lamp is pictured in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988, p. 80, plate 313. Provenance Minna Rosenblatt, Ltd., New York

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'Eighteen-Light Lily' Tiffany Table Lamp