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French Art Nouveau Ceramic Vase by de Feure

A French Art Nouveau porcelain vase by Georges de Feure, featuring a blue and pink floral decoration on a glazed cream-white ground. Made for La Maison Art Nouveau Bing. Similar vase in the collection of the Musée des Arts Décoratifs. Similar vases pictured in: "Art Nouveau Bing: Paris Style 1900" by Gabriel Weisberg, p. 204, pl. 198.

French Art Nouveau Ceramic Vase by de Feure

French Art Nouveau Covered Porcelain Jar by de Feure

A French Art Nouveau covered porcelain jar designed by Georges de Feure and manufactured by Dufraisseix & Abbot, Limoges for Art Nouveau Bing. In the manner of de Feure''s renowned textiles, this piece is decorated with elegantly painted abstract floral and vegetal designs. Pictured in "The Paris Salons 1895-1914: Volume IV Ceramics & Glass," by Alastair Duncan, Page 159.

French Art Nouveau Covered Porcelain Jar by de Feure

French Art Nouveau Ceramic Clock by Follot

An Austrian Art Nouveau porcelain and silvered clock by Paul Follot. This clock prominently features the arabesquing line of the Art Nouveau movement, both in shape and in the relief decoration. Abstract blue flower buds decorate the clock in panels at the top and behind the clock face. The silvered clock face and pendulum are also decorated in the whiplash motif, which makes this clock a complete and total work of Art Nouveau. A similar clock is pictured in: "Art Nouveau: The French Aesthetic," by Victor Arwas, London: Andreas Papadakis, 2002, p. 333; a similar clock is also pictured in the 1904 Louis Majorelle catalog, in the "Les Algues" Chamber, near the end of the catalog.

French Art Nouveau Ceramic Clock by Follot

French Art Nouveau "Danseuse A L''Écharpe No. 12" gilt bronze sculptures by Agathon Léonard.

A French Art Nouveau "Danseuse A L''Écharpe No. 12" gilt bronze sculpture by Agathon Léonard. Originally created as a smaller group of ceramic figures, possibly based on the dancer Loïe Fuller, the series was completed in hard porcelain by the Manufacture Nationale de Sèvres as a fifteen-piece table-top group, "Jeu de L''Echarpe." After acclaim at the Paris Exposition Universelle of 1900, the French foundry Susse Frères produced bronze casts of these, incorporating discreet lighting on some models. Published/Exhibited: Macklowe and Goldring, "Dynamic Beauty: Sculpture of Art Nouveau Paris," 2011, p. 190; Böstge, "Agathon Léonard: Le geste Art Nouveau," 2003, p. 75.

French Art Nouveau 'Danseuse A L''Écharpe No. 12' gilt bronze sculptures by Agathon Léonard.

Dutch Art Nouveau Eggshell Vase by Rozenburg

A Dutch Art Nouveau eggshell vase by Rozenburg. The vase is finely decorated with "bordeaux" colored irises with yellow beards and white daisies with yellow centers. Long sinuous finely-veined leaves curl around and behind the flowers and climb up the vase''s neck.The firm''s petal thin porcelain was developed in 1899 by the then director of the factory Julian Kok. It was nearly identical in quality to chinese porcelain in its eggshell thin quality and weightlessness. What differentiated it from chinese porcelain were its exquisite botanical illustrations and experimental shapes. The vase utilizes complementary colors, pairing purple-reds with golden yellows. The contours of the flowers and the stems of the leaves make use of the so called zweepslaglin (whiplash line. Similar vases are pictured in: "The Paris Salons 1895-1915, Vol. IV: Ceramics and Glass," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1998, p. 371. Provenance Private collection of Victor Arwas, London Acquired from the above by the present owner, circa 1995

Dutch Art Nouveau Eggshell Vase by Rozenburg

Dutch Art Nouveau Eggshell Vase by Rozenburg

A Dutch eggshell porcelain "Yellow Rose" vase by Rozenburg. decorated by W.P. Hartgring. The vase is decorated with a voluptuously blooming orange roses and buds. The variety shown here is a yellow cabbage rose, a hybrid rose developed by Dutch rose breeders in the period between the 17th century and the 19th century. They were also known as centifolia roses or hundred petals for their elaborate dense structure. The cabbage rose was renowned for its scent, cultivated in the city of of Grasse for perfurmery. The cabbage rose is encircled with cream colored lilacs and spiderwebs. The inclusion of the lilac and spiderweb by Hartgring was an homage to the firm''s most popular model, the purple lilac and spiderweb. Finely-veined green leaves curl around and behind the flowers. The decoration was meticulously executed using a stippling technique, recreating the texture of a "stipple engraving" print. Similar vases are pictured in: "The Paris Salons 1895-1915, Vol. IV: Ceramics and Glass," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1998, p. 371. Provenance Private collection of Victor Arwas, London Acquired from the above by the present owner, circa 1995

Dutch Art Nouveau Eggshell Vase by Rozenburg