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René Boivin Art Deco Platinum, Peridot and Diamond Ring

A French Art Deco platinum ring with peridot and diamonds by René Boivin. The ring centers on a cushion-cut peridot with an approximate weight of 3.25 carats, surrounded by 60 pavé set round-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of 3.60 carats. With Certificate of Authenticity from Madame Françoise Cailles, expert for Boivin. René Boivin has been one of the most significant jewelry houses for the best part of a century since its late 19th Century beginnings under its founder Jules René Boivin. The significant legacy is due in no small measure to Jeanne Boivin, who took over her husband''s business after his death in 1917. Rather than wholly embracing the Art Deco trend that engulfed the rest of the French jewelry world in the late 1920s and early 1930s, she was also inspired by the exoticism that was enchanting the likes of Picasso and Paul Gauguin. Remaining close to the design greats such as Sandoz or Fouquet, she added her own feminine eye to the movement''s ideals with the help of Suzanne Belperron from 1921 to 1932. The Boivin house would go on to create many spectacular jewels famously inspired by nature and sea life. A similar ring is pictured in "Rene Boivin Jeweller", by Françoise Cailles, Quartet Books, 1994.

René Boivin Art Deco Platinum, Peridot and Diamond Ring

Blue Calcedony, Ruby, Sapphire and Emerald Brooch/Necklace by Suzanne Belperron

A French Modernist platinum dress clip by famed designer Suzanne Belperron that can also be worn on a necklace with nesting rows of blue chalcedony beads. Similar in style and spirit to the necklace worn by the Duchess of Windsor, Wallis Simpson. The clip is carved blue chalcedony in a half-barrel design, set with 1 cushion-cut, one oval, 2 rectangular-cut and two square-cut sapphires, 10 square-cut rubies, 1 rectangular-cut ruby and 8 square-cut emeralds. Measuring 3.9 cm long by 3.4 cm wide, weighing 39.3 grams. French assay marks for gold and partially effaced maker''s marks for Société Groëné et Darde. By the remarkable female designer Suzanne Belperron. Accompanying certificate reads: We do hereby certify that the piece pictured below was manufactured in Paris between 1932 and 1940 by the company B. Herz from a design by Suzanne Belperron. Chalcedony beads included: 17 inches in length, detachable.

Blue Calcedony, Ruby, Sapphire and Emerald Brooch/Necklace by Suzanne Belperron

A Pair of Multi-Gemstone Brooches by Rene Boivin

A set of two of French Art Deco 18 karat gold "lilac-leaf" clip brooches,the larger set with oval-cut green tourmalines, yellow heliodor beryls, yellow-gray beryls and aquamarines, highlighted by a single-cut diamond stem set in platinum, the second set with circular and oval-cut pink tourmalines, pale amethysts, and green tourmalines, both with medium-relief naturalistic modeling, by René Boivin. Executed under the leadership of famed Boivin designer Juliette Moutard, these spectacular pieces are as significant in the history of high jewelry as they are beautiful. These elegant brooches demonstrate the height of Moutard''s particular style: the refined, geometrically-rendered organic shape of the lilac leaf, the sensitive and masterful employment of color gradation, and the interplay of complementary shapes are all hallmarks of Moutard''s work for Boivin. The brooches have oval-cut tourmalines, green and yellow beryl, which together have and approximate total weight of 42.25 carats; aquamarines with an approximate total weight of 17.00 carats; and 30 single-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of .70 carat. With authenticity report from expert Francoise Cailles. Boivin''s work is a remarkable exception to many of the presiding trends of the 1930s. For one, the house eschewed the stark, monotonous, and highly geometric Art Deco stye. While other firms continued ... to churn out architecturally clean designs in diamond and platinum, Boivin maintained their commitment to celebrating color and the organic forms of the natural world. Also notable, and unusual for the time, is that Boivin was an all-female led firm. After the premature death of René Boivin in 1917, the firm would be led until its dissolution by his widow, Jeanne Boivin, and a host of brilliant female designers, among them Suzanne Belperron, Juliette Moutard and Germaine Boivin,

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A Pair of Multi-Gemstone Brooches by Rene Boivin

Bronze Art Nouveau Figural Candelabrum by Gustav Gurschner

A polychrome bronze Art Nouveau figural candelabrum by Gustav Gurschner. A young woman with brown hair, dressed in a long flowing green skirt, with her breasts exposed, holds a seed capsule in each arm, into which a candle can be inserted. Gurschner displayed his work through the Viennese Secession Group gaining him much acclaim. His depiction of bare breasted women largely survives any stricture in that they have a quiet dignity and poetic charm that never stoops to vulgarization. The woman holds in each arm a lotus flower seed capsule. The size of the capsules relative to her body makes her seem a flower fairy or spirit. A candle would be placed on each capsule, illuminating the dinner table with spectacular charm. In the lead up to World War I, Germany was swept by a wave of artistic nationalism. After spending most of the 19th century dominated by French influence, German artists desired a return to tradition. Integral to German tradition was the vibrant color of Late Medieval wooden sculpture. Since the 14th century, much of antique polychromy had deteriorated considerably, leaving large portions of the wood base exposed. The rich burnt sienna of this woman''s skin may refer to this exposed wood finish. Alternatively it might refer to the skin color of the dancers from the Java Pavillion (1889). After their blockbuster appearance in the World''s Fair, depictions of the d ... ancers abounded in salons. Brown-skinned and black-haired women became appreciated in this context as harbingers of exotic delights. A similar candlestick is pictured in: "The Paris Salons 1895-1915, Vol. V: Objects d''Art and Metalware," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1999, p. 305 Provenance Rudi Schmutz, Vienna Acquired from the above by the present owner, circa 1980s Literature Alastair Duncan, Art Nouveau Sculpture, New York, 1978, p. 49 Wolf Uecker, Art Nouveau and Art Deco Lamps and Candlesticks, New York, 1986, p. 15 Yvonne Brunhammer and Suzanne Tise, French Decorative Art, the Société des Artistes Décorateurs 1900-1942, Paris, 1990, p. 8 (for the model depicted in the Manuel Orazi poster)

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Bronze Art Nouveau Figural Candelabrum by Gustav Gurschner