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French Art Nouveau Bronze Sculpture by Rivere

A French Art Nouveau patinated bronze sculpture by Théodore Rivie`re, featuring two intricately-sculpted figures from the story of Carthage. The woman has emerald eyes and her crown is accented with rubies. The subject of this figural sculpture is taken from Gustave Flaubert''s novel, "Salammbô." The story takes place between 241 and 238 BC, during the war between Carthage and its mercenaries, who were in revolt. Mâthô, the Lybian rebel chief, fell in love with Salammbô, the daughter of the Carthaginian leader. This scene depicts the moment when the mortally wounded Mâthô dies at Salammbô''s feet, declaring his love for her. The figure of Salammbô, the femme fatale,also inspired other Symbolist artists. Pictured in: "Art Nouveau 1890-1914", V&A exhibit by Paul Greenhalgh, page 122; "Nineteenth Century Sculpture" by Maurice Rheims, p. 372 # 15; and in: "Dynamic Beauty: Sculpture of Art Nouveau Paris" by Macklowe Gallery, The Studley Press, 2011, p. 229.

French Art Nouveau Bronze Sculpture by Rivere

Tiffany Studios New York "Tel el Amarna" Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York "Tel el Amarna" Favrile glass vase with an iridescent blue body and a brilliant cobalt blue foot and rim featuring an Egyptian-inspired grey and white "Tel el Amarna" motif. Similary decorated vases are pictured in: "The Art of Louis Comfort Tiffany," by Tessa Paul, New York: Exeter Books, 1987, p. 75.

Tiffany Studios New York 'Tel el Amarna' Vase

Decorated Glass Vase by Louis Comfort Tiffany

A decorated glass vase by Louis Comfort Tiffany. This vase has a vivid iridescent blue pulled feather design on an iridescent charcoal background. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: "The Art Glass of Louis Comfort Tiffany," by Paul E. Doros, New York: The Vendome Press, 2013, p. 212, fig. 169.

Decorated Glass Vase by Louis Comfort Tiffany

René Boivin Art Deco Platinum, Peridot and Diamond Ring

A French Art Deco platinum ring with peridot and diamonds by René Boivin. The ring centers on a cushion-cut peridot with an approximate weight of 3.25 carats, surrounded by 60 pavé set round-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of 3.60 carats. With Certificate of Authenticity from Madame Françoise Cailles, expert for Boivin. René Boivin has been one of the most significant jewelry houses for the best part of a century since its late 19th Century beginnings under its founder Jules René Boivin. The significant legacy is due in no small measure to Jeanne Boivin, who took over her husband''s business after his death in 1917. Rather than wholly embracing the Art Deco trend that engulfed the rest of the French jewelry world in the late 1920s and early 1930s, she was also inspired by the exoticism that was enchanting the likes of Picasso and Paul Gauguin. Remaining close to the design greats such as Sandoz or Fouquet, she added her own feminine eye to the movement''s ideals with the help of Suzanne Belperron from 1921 to 1932. The Boivin house would go on to create many spectacular jewels famously inspired by nature and sea life. A similar ring is pictured in "Rene Boivin Jeweller", by Françoise Cailles, Quartet Books, 1994.

René Boivin Art Deco Platinum, Peridot and Diamond Ring

French Art Nouveau Ceramic Clock by Follot

An Austrian Art Nouveau porcelain and silvered clock by Paul Follot. This clock prominently features the arabesquing line of the Art Nouveau movement, both in shape and in the relief decoration. Abstract blue flower buds decorate the clock in panels at the top and behind the clock face. The silvered clock face and pendulum are also decorated in the whiplash motif, which makes this clock a complete and total work of Art Nouveau. A similar clock is pictured in: "Art Nouveau: The French Aesthetic," by Victor Arwas, London: Andreas Papadakis, 2002, p. 333; a similar clock is also pictured in the 1904 Louis Majorelle catalog, in the "Les Algues" Chamber, near the end of the catalog.

French Art Nouveau Ceramic Clock by Follot

Tiffany Studios New York Favrile Paperweight Vase

A Favrile "paperweight" vase by Tiffany Studios New York. The earliest examples of "paperweight" objects appeared around 1900, Louis Comfort Tiffany loved this technique of encasing a design within a dome of transparent glass because it was a great vehicle for expressing his love of nature, particularly flowers. This vase is internally decorated with gladiolus flowers with yellow, green and purple threads. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: "The Art Glass of Louis Comfort Tiffany," by Paul E. Doros, New York: The Vendome Press, 2013, p. 136, fig.82. Also pictured in "Louis Comfort Tiffany," by Jacob Baal-Teshuva, New York: Taschen, 2001, page 291.

Tiffany Studios New York Favrile Paperweight Vase

Bronze Portrait of Sarah Bernhardt by Paul François Berthoud

A French Art Nouveau gilt and patinated bronze portrait of Sarah Bernhardt by Paul François Berthoud. Sarah Bernhardt was the most important dramatic actress of the 19th century. She is portrayed here with a jeweled sash and flowing hair, no doubt a reference to her role as Gismonda in the play by Victorien Sardou. A slightly different portrait sculpture of Bernhardt by Berthoud is in the collection of the Musée d''Orsay.

Bronze Portrait of Sarah Bernhardt by Paul François Berthoud

Floral Vase by Tiffany Studios New York

A Favrile flower form vase by Louis Comfort Tiffany. The vase is iridescent yellow, with hints of orange, and has a ruffled rim. Favrile glass vases in the shapes of stylized flowers were among the earliest creations of the Tiffany Glass and Decorating Company, forerunner of Tiffany Studios. Initial examples of this technique date from approximately 1894, although later pieces show greater refinement. Flower forms have great variety in stem length and rim shape. A similar vase is pictured in: "Tiffany at Auction," by Alastair Duncan, New York: Rizzoli, 1981, p. 24, cat. no. 44; "The Tiffany Collection of the Chrysler Museum at Norfolk," by Paul E. Doros, Richmond, VA: W. M. Brown & son, Inc., 1978, p. 32, cat. no. 26; "Louis Comfort Tiffany," by Jacob Baal-Teshuva, New York: Taschen, 2001, p. 260; "The Art Glass of Louis Comfort Tiffany," by Paul E. Doros, New York: The Vendome Press, 2013, p. 74, fig. 27.

Floral Vase by Tiffany Studios New York