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"Marsh"

Louis Majorelle French Art Nouveau "Orchid" Table

A French Art Nouveau two-tiered ""Caltha des Marais" table with ormolu mounts by Louis Majorelle. The table was created at the height of Majorelle''s most fertile period. While pastiches marked Majorelle''s early career, Majorelle''s mature style reduced the excessive ornament of the ancien regime into the fluid line of modernity. This reduction is most apparent in the table''s skirt, where the baroque swag motif transforms into a graduating concave form. The table''s ormolu mounts are bereft of foliate scrolls and grotesque motifs. Instead, Majorelle''s sophisticated naturalism takes inspiration from the flowers of his native Nancy. Marsh marigolds form the top of each mount. Among the few flowers to grow in the caliginous marshes, their yellow petals are a welcome respite to the eye. So loved was the marsh marigold that Shakespeare proclaimed they grew at heaven''s gate, "Hark, hark! The lark at heaven''s gate sings...His steeds to water at those springs, On chaliced flowers that lies; And winking Mary-buds begin, To ope their golden eyes." The marsh marigolds terminate in "saggitaire fleche d''eau" or arrowhead leaves. Both flowers were endemic to lakes in the Vosges region. The tabletop is set with Amboyna burl veneer. Amboyna veneer is among the world''s rarest and most expensive veneers — holding the distinction of being the original wood used on Rolls Royce dashboards. ... Against the sobriety of the walnut skirt, the Amboyna burl gives the table an air of luxury. A similar table is pictured in: "The Paris Salons 1895-1915, Vol. III: Furniture," by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1996, p. 396 (Chairs and tables Salon, 1904); and in: "Louis Majorelle: Master of Art Nouveau Design," by Alastair Duncan, New York: Harry N. Abrams, Inc., 1991, plate 57.

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Louis Majorelle French Art Nouveau 'Orchid' Table

Marsh & Co. Mid-20th Century Jadeite Jade, Diamond, Steel and Platinum Ring

An American Mid-20th Century oxidized steel, platinum, jadeite and diamond ring, by G. T. Marsh & Co. The ring set with a marquise-shape jadeite cabochon, flanked by lines of 8 round diamonds with an approximate total weight of .16 carat. G.T. Marsh & Co. was a San Francisco-based Asian art dealer known for their distinctive jewels. As a boy infatuated with Asian culture, George Turner Marsh apprenticed with a Japanese tea merchant, remaining there alone while his Australian family continued on to San Francisco, where they settled. Young George used his time in Yokohama to become conversant in Japanese art and aesthetics, and after re-joining his family, established an Asian art gallery using the expertise he had acquired. During the 1930s, 40s and 50s, his family began designing jewelry based on their interpretation of masterful Japanese metalwork together with the favored gems of the region, jadeite, coral and pearls. The firm''s unique steel jewelry was produced by bluing and sandblasting techniques, which gave the metal its matte finish, an extraordinary base for its sparkling, gleaming gems.

Marsh & Co. Mid-20th Century Jadeite Jade, Diamond, Steel and Platinum Ring

Marsh Mid-20th Century Steel and Pearl Dress Set

A Mid-20th Century patinated steel and gold dress set with cultured pearls by G.T. Marsh. The full dress set is composed of double sided cuff links, three dress studs and two dress buttons. The set is in a square geometric step motif with a pearl at the center. In the original signed Marsh box. G.T. Marsh & Co. was a San Francisco-based Asian art dealer known for their distinctive jewels. As a boy infatuated with Asian culture, George Turner Marsh apprenticed with a Japanese tea merchant, remaining there alone while his Australian family continued on to San Francisco, where they settled. Young George used his time in Yokohama to become conversant in Japanese art and aesthetics, and after re-joining his family, established an Asian art gallery using the expertise he had acquired. During the 1930s, 40s and 50s, his family began designing jewelry based on their interpretation of masterful Japanese metalwork together with the favored gems of the region, jadeite, coral and pearls. The firm''s unique steel jewelry was produced by bluing and sandblasting techniques, which gave the metal its matte finish, an extraordinary base for its sparkling, gleaming gems. "Marsh had a jeweler that worked exclusively for them. He was Italian, but he also liked shotguns and, because of his interest in shotguns, he had an interest in iron and metallurgy and what they did to rifles and shotguns t ... o keep them from rusting. And the Marsh''s jewelry is steel that''s been treated with gun bluing. He sandblasted the steel before he gun blued it, that gives it this marvelous matte finish. And nowadays I don''t think there is anything more chic than the idea of black jewelry where the diamonds and the white gold absolutely pop and these marvelous pearls that he suspended have motion...The firm closed its doors in 2001." Barry Weber on the Antiques Road Show.

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Marsh Mid-20th Century Steel and Pearl Dress Set

Marsh Mid-20th Century Patinated Steel, Palladium, Pearl and Diamond Ring

An American patinated steel, palladium, mabé pearl and diamond ring, by G.T. Marsh. The ring centers on a 15.4mm Mabé pearl flanked by 6 round brilliant-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of .30 carat, mounted in patinated steel, completed by a palladium shank. G.T. Marsh & Co. was a San Francisco-based Asian art dealer known for their distinctive jewels. As a boy infatuated with Asian culture, George Turner Marsh apprenticed with a Japanese tea merchant, remaining there alone while his Australian family continued on to San Francisco, where they settled. Young George used his time in Yokohama to become conversant in Japanese art and aesthetics, and after re-joining his family, established an Asian art gallery using the expertise he had acquired. During the 1930s, 40s and 50s, his family began designing jewelry based on their interpretation of masterful Japanese metalwork together with the favored gems of the region, jadeite, coral and pearls. The firm''s unique steel jewelry was produced by bluing and sandblasting techniques, which gave the metal its matte finish, an extraordinary base for its sparkling, gleaming gems.

Marsh Mid-20th Century Patinated Steel, Palladium, Pearl and Diamond Ring

Tiffany Studios "Marsh Marigold" Planter

A Tiffany Studios bronze "Marsh Marigold" planter, featuring a repeating pattern of marsh marigold leaves and vines around the gilt bronze base. The marsh marigold was included in one of the first four "Dragonfly" lamps made in April, 1899, entitled "Dragonfly and water flowers." The lamp was a collaboration between the female designers Clara Driscoll and Alice Carmen Gouvy. Gouvy, who would later design for the metalwork and enameling department created this breathtaking naturalistic design. The planter has faint reddish enameling in the design to give the illusion of a fierce sunset peaking through a dense underbrush. The truly organic shape of the leaves featured is highlighted by the undulating modeling of their forms. Identical model planter pictured in "Louis C. Tiffany''s Glass - Bronzes - Lamps: A complete collector''s guide", by Robert Koch, page 224.

Tiffany Studios 'Marsh Marigold' Planter

"Dragonflies and Water Flowers" Tiffany Lamp

A rare Tiffany Studios New York "Dragonflies and Water Flowers" leaded glass and bronze table lamp. The shade depicts a band of blue dragonflies with large red eyes and overlapping wire mesh wings. The dragonflies are shown amidst an abundance of marsh marigolds, set against a watery blue and green ground comprised of rippled and mottled glass. We can imagine that the dragonflies who adorn the lower edge of the shade are flying low across a verdant field. Each dragonfly is adorned with cerise-ruby glass eyes, and on one of the dragonflies, the eyes are shifted so as to make it appear as if the insect is turning its head. Clara Driscoll, head of the Tiffany Studios Women's Glass Cutting Department, designed the dragonfly lamp, earning much acclaim for her artistic prowess in her time. The "Dragonflies with Water Flowers" was one of the first four "Dragonfly" lamps made in April, 1899. The lamp was sent to Grafton Galleries to be a part of an exhibition for Art Nouveau vanguard Siegfried Bing. It was the forward thinking designs of Clara Driscoll that secured America's place in Art Nouveau. The shade sits atop a "Blown" base of alternating dark and lighter green. The base's glass recalls the parallel-veined leaves of the flowers planted around Tiffany's lily pond at Laurelton Hall. The base sits upon a collar of patinated bronze lily pads. Tiffany was an early client of legend ... ary water lily cultivator Joseph Bory Latour-Marliac (1830-1911.) Latour-Marliac's lilies are most recognizable from Monet's "Water Lilies" series. As an exhibitor at the Exposition Universelle of 1889, Tiffany was able to firsthand view the horticultural splendor of Marliac's water lilies. A range of colors never before achieved were displayed, including stunning yellows, whites, pinks, and reds. Soon after, Tiffany put in an order for a wide range of Marliac cultivars, embellishing Tiffany's vast water garden. A similar shade is pictured in: "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models", by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antiques Collectors' Club Ltd., p. 48, cat. 164, shade # 1467. A similar base is pictured in: "The Lamps of Tiffany", by Dr. Egon Neustadt, New York: The Fairfield Press, 1970, p. 101, plate 147.

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'Dragonflies and Water Flowers' Tiffany Lamp