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"Elizabeth"

French Art Nouveau Silvered Figural Sculpture by Leonard

A French Art Nouveau silvered bronze figural sculpture by Agathon Léonard featuring a woman dancing titled "Danseuse chantant" (singing dancer). This figure is one of "Le jeu d''écharpe" (The Scarf Set), originally produced and cast by Sèvres, and awarded a Gold Medal at the 1900 Paris Exposition Universelle. The series was later cast in bronze by the Susse Frères foundry, with special limited editions in silvered bronze, such as this piece. Le jeu d''écharpe, created by Agathon Léonard at the turn of the 20th century, consists of 15 sculptures of young women in various poses. Some women dance with scarves; others hold musical instruments or carry flaming torches. Each of the 15 dancers is unique in terms of her pose, hair style and dress. Their dresses exhibit fluid drapery with flowing sleeves. Le jeu d''echarpe was inspired by the dancer Loïe Fuller. A similar model is pictured in "Agathon Léonard: Le geste Art nouveau," by Ingelore Boestge, Somogy editions d''art, Paris 2003, p.62, Plate number 35. Provenance: Elizabeth Taylor

French Art Nouveau Silvered Figural Sculpture by Leonard

Elizabeth Locke Hammered Gold Cuff Bracelet

An American Estate 19 karat gold bangle bracelet by Elizabeth Locke. The hinged bracelet is hammered gold with beaded detail in the Etruscan Revival style. With signed pouch.

Elizabeth Locke Hammered Gold Cuff Bracelet

Decorated Enameled Silver Jewelry Box by Elizabeth Ethel Copeland.

Elizabeth Edith Copeland was a talented enamellist and metalsmith of the Arts & Crafts period. Her artistic ambitions were frustrated for years, but at the age of thirty Copeland found a way to juggle her daily duties on her family''s dairy farm with classes in art and design in Boston. She pored over her class notes while ironing, remarking drolly that "No doubt the garments suffered." Thankfully, she persisted, attracting the attention of a wealthy patron, Sarah Choate Sears, an accomplished photographer and watercolorist who had won prizes at four world expositions. Sears sent Copeland to London for a year to apprentice under the renowned enamellist Alexander Fisher. Like her Boston colleague, the accomplished jeweler Josephine Hartwell Shaw, Copeland earned the prestigious "Medalist" title from the Society of Arts & Crafts. Her metalwork and jewelry have entered the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Art Institute of Chicago, and the Boston Museum of Fine Arts. This silver box shows Copeland''s work at its best, the richly-colored poppies and senstiive, hand-wrought artistry attesting to her deep affinity with the enamellists of the Renaissance. A similarly exquisite enamel and silver box by Copeland is on view in the Metropolitan Museum of Art''s 150th Anniversary exhibition, "THE MET 150". The Detroit Institute of Arts has since 1919 had a Ciborium in silver and enamel as part of their collection.

Decorated Enameled Silver Jewelry Box by Elizabeth Ethel Copeland.

Victorian Gold Locket

An English Victorian 15 karat gold locket. The polished oval locket and bail with vertically-set cable chain wirework motif, opening to an interior with double compartments enclosed under glass panes, with interior inscription "Mary Graham May 6, 1873." Lockets became items of sentimental jewelry in the Renaissance, when Queen Elizabeth commissioned a locket ring, which she never took off, containing a portrait of her mother, Anne Boleyn, in one compartment and herself in the other. In the era of Queen Victoria, lockets were often given to commemorate romance, birthdays, or a new baby, and contained portraits of loved ones.

Victorian Gold Locket