Detroit Institute of Arts

Detroit Institute of Arts

The Detroit Institute of Art's collection is among the top six in the United States, comprising a multicultural and multinational survey of human creativity from prehistory through the 21st century. The foundation was laid by William Valentiner, a scholar and art historian from Berlin, who was director from 1924-45. His extensive contacts in Europe, along with support from generous patrons, enabled him to acquire many important works that established the framework of today's collections. Among the notable acquisitions during his tenure are Mexican artist Diego Rivera's Detroit Industry fresco cycle, which Rivera considered his most successful work, and Vincent van Gogh's Self Portrait, the first van Gogh painting to enter a U.S. museum collection.

A hallmark of the DIA is the diversity of the collection. In addition to outstanding American, European, Modern and Contemporary, and Graphic art, the museum holds significant works of African, Asian, Native American, Oceanic, Islamic, and Ancient art. Among these are the masterpiece sculpture Nail Figure from Zaire and a rare Korean Head of Buddha. In 2000, the DIA established the General Motors Center for African American Art as a curatorial department in order to broaden the museum's collection of African American art.


Related items:

 
French Art Nouveau iIthograph, "La Plume - Zodiac," by Alphonse Mucha
Mucha — ML-18112
Pair of French Art Nouveau Lithographs, "Dawn and Dusk", by Alphonse Mucha
Mucha — ML-18442
French Art Nouveau LIthograph, "La Princesse Lointaine" by Alphonse Mucha
Mucha — ML-18570
French Art Nouveau Lithograph titled "Hamlet", by Alphonse Mucha
Alphonse Mucha — ML-19238