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French Pâte-de-Verre Plaque by Cros

A French bas-relief glass pâte-de-verre plaque by Henri Cros, depicting a mythical dragon or sea creature in hues of pink, against a crystal-like ground. This is an experimental plaque by the originator of the revival of the ancient pâte-de-verre process.

French Pâte-de-Verre Plaque by Cros

Decorative Vase by Daum

A French Art Nouveau wheel-carved cameo footed glass vase by Daum. Deep purple flowers are featured against a plum and blue martelé background. Vases with similar decoration are pictured in: "Daum Frères: Maîtres Verriers", 1892-1935, by Katharina Büttiker-Weber, Zurich: Galerie Katharina Büttiker, 1986, cat. nos. 42-44.

Decorative Vase by Daum

Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase with Serpents by Ernest Leveillé

An Art Nouveau cameo glass vase by Ernest Leveillé for Escalier de Cristal, with two wheel carved red serpents in high relief intertwined around the outer surface. The background glass has a moss-like texture trapped within the vessel. The vase sits within a bronze mount at the bottom. The style of the background glass is the same as in many of his sophisticated pieces and the technique is the same as in many of his hand carved (wheel-carved) glass vases. The vase was retailed by Escalier de Cristal of Paris, one of the great proponents of Art Nouveau at the turn of the last century.

Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase with Serpents by Ernest Leveillé

French Art Nouveau silver and plique-à-jour enamel coupe d''ornement by Eugène Feuillâtre

A French Art Nouveau silver and plique-à-jour enamel coupe d''ornement by Eugène Feuillâtre. This exceptional compote features delicate and stylized floral patterns on the upper and lower portions. Green leaves encircle the base of the piece and the sinewy stem of the petite cup appears to grow out of the foliage below, and a spray of pink flowers blooms at the top of the compote. Feuillâtre complimented the deeply rooted organic motifs of his quintessentially Art Nouveau compote by adorning the piece with small green enamel buds on the top and bottom of the stem. This compote is particularly remarkable because it is made almost entirely of plique-à-jour enamel. Eugene Feuillâtre (1870-1916) was a sculptor, enamelist, silversmith and jeweler. He worked for Lalique at the end of the 19th century and established his own firm in 1899, specializing in plique-à-jour decorated objects. He also perfected the technique of enameling on silver and platinum. Provenance: the Collection of Joseph R. Ritman. A nearly identical coupe d''ornement resides in the Musee D''Orsay in Paris.

French Art Nouveau silver and plique-à-jour enamel coupe d''ornement by Eugène Feuillâtre

Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

A French Art Nouveau cameo glass vase by Daum, featuring a scene of red blooming flowers on an opaque white martelé ground. The flowers, which have dark centers, are suspended from dark curving stems that emerge from dark green carved leaves. Pictured in Glass, Art Nouveau to Art Deco, by Victor Arwass, page 83. Art Nouveau, the French Aesthetic,by Victor Arwas, page 506.

Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

French Art Nouveau cameo glass vase by Émile Gallé

A French Art Nouveau cameo glass vase by Émile Gallé. This large vase is decorated with wheel carved purple trumpet-creepers and vines against a green background. The flowers and vines climb up the ribbed neck of the vase. The "belle de jour" vase is a flattened baluster form vase with a everted mouth, rounded and polished rim, long slender waisted neck, short globular body, and an applied disk foot. The vase features an intercalaire layer of coarse jade frit in the top three-quarters of the vase and fine indigo frit in the bottom quarter of the vase. To construct the vase, a bubble was blown into the gather, which was cased and parison inflated into a nineteen ribbed dip mold. The stem was subsequently plucked out and twisted counterclockwise. Finally a soffieta was used to open the mouth and a pair of jacks was used to evert the rim. The vase was later cameo cut with exquisite detailing in the venation and the hirsute texture of the leaves. Galle speaks of his encounter with the belle de jour or Convolvulus mauritanicus during his visit to the Borromean islands in Lake Maggiore. As the President of the Nancy Horticultural society, Galle was received with much enthusiasm from the Maggiore horticultural community. Among his guides during his stay was Alessandro Pirrota, the chief gardener of the Borromean islands. At the time of Galle''s visit, the number of species and ... varieties in the gardens reached their height amounting to 3,900. Galle compared the Count''s garden to the gardens built by the Jesuit missionaries for the Chinese emperor in the seventeenth century [Qianlong emperor.] As part of his tour of the islands, Galle showed him a series of four grottoes, each of which were dedicated to cultivation of a different flower. The fourth grotto included the Convolvulus Mauritanians. The sight of the Convolvulus growing in the wild was astounding to Galle since in Nancy, they could only grow in cold greenhouses. In this vase Galle has recreated the magical experience of the Maggiore grottoes. Everything from the indigo coloration of the blooms to the crepuscular green tinged atmosphere transport the viewer to this alpine wonder. The morning glory has an added relation to Japanese culture. Commonly featured in the eighteenth century Shigemasa Kitao birds and flowers prints that Galle consulted, the creation of a jade simulant is only fitting for this oriental flower.

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French Art Nouveau cameo glass vase by Émile Gallé

Art Nouveau pâte de verre "Masques" Vase by Gabriel Argy-Rousseau

A French Art Nouveau pâte de verre "Masques" vase by Gabriel Argy-Rousseau. The vase is decorated with two red masks that are framed in purple and green leaves. Provenance: Christie''s, New York, Important 20th Century Decorative Arts Including Works by Tiffany Studios, 13 June 2002, lot 39. A similar vase is pictured in J. Bloch-Dermont, Les Pâtes de Verre G. Argy-Rousseau Catalogue Raisonné, Paris, 1990, p. 178, no. 14.06.

Art Nouveau pâte de verre 'Masques' Vase by Gabriel Argy-Rousseau

A French Art Nouveau Marquetry Vase by Émile Gallé

A French Art Nouveau marquetry vase by Émile Gallé. The vase features crocus flowers in hues of orange and purple against a cream ground with stripes in pink and red. The vase is accented with an applied band of tendrils backed by silver foil inclusions. A similar vase is pictured in: Émile Gallé et le Verre, la Collection du muse de l''École de Nancy, Parks: Somogy editions d''art, 2004, p. 137, ca. not. 222.

A French Art Nouveau Marquetry Vase by Émile Gallé

"Winter Scene" Glass Vase by Daum.

A French Art Nouveau "Winter Scene" cameo glass vase by Daum Nancy. A group of bare trees in the foreground sit on snowy ground under a yellow and orange sky. A larger group of bare trees are in the background. PROVENANCE: From an Unreserved Texas Estate. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: Daum Frères: Maîtres Verriers, 1892-1935, by Katharina Büttiker-Weber, Zurich: Galerie Katharina Büttiker, 1986, cat. no 27.

'Winter Scene' Glass Vase by Daum.

French Art Nouveau "Winter Landscape" Vase by Daum Nancy

A French Art Nouveau "Winter Landscape" vase with an inverted lip, by Daum Nancy. The etched and enameled glass vase depicts trees in a barren meadow, a forested background against an amber and orange sky. PROVENANCE: From an Unreserved Texas Estate. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: Daum Frères: Maîtres Verriers, 1892-1935, by Katharina Büttiker-Weber, Zurich: Galerie Katharina Büttiker, 1986, cat. no 27.

French Art Nouveau 'Winter Landscape' Vase by Daum Nancy

French Art Nouveau Glass Vase by Émile Gallé,

A French Art Nouveau carved cameo glass vase by Émile Gallé, decorated with oak leaves and a staghorn beetle.. On a background that changes gradually from pale yellow to pale orange, a brown staghorn beetle climbs a brown branch toward green leaves. A similar vase is pictured in: Émile Gallé, by Philippe Garner, London: Academy Editions, 1976, p. 112.

French Art Nouveau Glass Vase by Émile Gallé,

French Art Nouveau Vase, "Eucalyptus," by Gabriel Argy-Rousseau

A French Art Nouveau pâte de verre vase, "Eucalyptus," by Gabriel Argy-Rousseau. The vase has three isolated brown branches, each with curving purple and green leaves, and flower buds, also in purple and green, in relief. Provenance: Mr. Kenneth W. Davis, Fort Worth, Texas. An example of this vase is pictured in: G. Argy Rousseau: Glassware as Art, by Janine Bloch-Dermant, London: Thames and Hudson, Ltd., 1991, p. 180, cat. no 19.06.

French Art Nouveau Vase, 'Eucalyptus,' by Gabriel Argy-Rousseau

"Langouste," pâte de verre vide-poche by Walter and Bergé.

A French Art Nouveau pâte de verre vide-poche by Amalric Walter and Henri Bergé. This piece features a brown "Langouste" resting on a blue-green shaped dish. A similar vide-poche is pictured in: Amalric Walter (1870-1959), by Keith Cummings, Kingswinford: Broadfield House Glass Museum, 2006, p. 24, cat. no. 28b.

'Langouste,' pâte de verre vide-poche by Walter and Bergé.

"Langouste", pâte de verre paperweight by Walter and Bergé.

A French Art Nouveau pâte de verre paperweight (presse papiers) by Amalric Walter and Henri Bergé. The paperweight has a brown "Langouste" resting on a sculpted pâte de verre base. There is great detail in the claws and the sections of the tail. A similar paperweight is pictured in: Amalric Walter (1870-1959), by Keith Cummings, Kingswinford: Broadfield House Glass Museum, 2006, p. 49, cat. no. 77c.

'Langouste', pâte de verre paperweight by Walter and Bergé.

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass by Émile Gallé

A French Art Nouveau cameo glass vase by Émile Gallé. The carved blooming flowers are painted in reds and whites, with green accents. Some of the carved stems are also painted, in reds and greens.

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass by Émile Gallé

Art Nouveau Pâte de Verre Plaque by Amalric Walter

A French Art Nouveau pâte de verre "Crab" plaque by Amalric Walter. The red-brown crab, which has green and yellow accents on its shell and claws, sits on a mottled pale gray background. It is surrounded by red seaweed and yellow seashells.

Art Nouveau Pâte de Verre Plaque by Amalric Walter

Art Nouveau Pâte de Verre Plaque by Amalric Walter

A French Art Nouveau pâte de verre "Langouste" plaque by Amalric Walter. This six-sided plaque shows a green lobster surrounded by yellow seaweed and shells, on a pale background.

Art Nouveau Pâte de Verre Plaque by Amalric Walter

"Grapevine" Cameo Glass vase by Émile Gallé

A French Art Nouveau "Grapevine blowout" cameo glass vase by Émile Gallé. The vase is decorated with gray-violet grapes hanging from red vines and surrounded by dark red-brown foliage. The background is opalescent cream.

'Grapevine' Cameo Glass vase by Émile Gallé

Walter and Bergé Pâte de Verre Lizards Tray

A French Art Nouveau pâte de verre tray by Amalric Walter. This tray is decorated with a spotted green lizard lying on the outer rim of the yellow dish. A similar dish is pictured in: Amalric Walter (1870-1959), by Keith Cummings, Kingswinford: Broadfield House Glass Museum, 2006, p. 19, plate 16.

Walter and  Bergé  Pâte de Verre Lizards Tray

Art Nouveau "Crabe" Vide Poche by Amalric Walter

A French Art Deco pâte de verre vide poche by Amalric Walter and Henri Bergé. The tray features a black and brown crab with yellow highlights against a blue and yellow mottled background. The hexagonal form and radiating lines out of the crab''s back plant this piece firmly in the Art Deco aesthetic of geometry and symmetry. A similar dish is pictured in: "Amalric Walter (1870-1959)", by Keith Cummings, Kingswinford: Broadfield House Glass Museum, 2006, p. 18, plate 13.

Art Nouveau 'Crabe' Vide Poche by Amalric Walter

French Art Nouveau ''Fleurs de Pommier'' Cameo Glass Vase by Émile Gallé.

A French Art Nouveau ''Fleurs de pommier'' cameo glass vase by Émile Gallé. This ovular vase features crimson leaves and crisp red blossoms on a gold ground. The flora is rendered in slightly translucent glass, which makes a remarkable contrast against the opaque ground. Gallé had a remarkable ability to convey feeling and time in his work. With a stagnant sky and vividly warm color, this vase has the essence of a summer sunset. A similar vase is pictured in: Glass by Gallé, by Alastair Duncan and Georges de Bartha, New York: Harry N. Abrams, Inc., 1984, p. 195, plate 295.

French Art Nouveau ''Fleurs de Pommier'' Cameo Glass Vase by Émile Gallé.

French Art Nouveau "Nénuphars" Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

A French Art Nouveau "Nénuphars" cameo glass vase by Daum. The opalescent body of the vase features wheel-carved orange and brown water lilies in varied states of maturity against a blue martelé ground.

French Art Nouveau 'Nénuphars' Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

French Art Nouveau Pâte-de-Verre Paperweight by Walter

A French Art Nouveau pâte-de-verre paperweight by Almaric Walter and Henri Bergé featuring an intricately textured blue and green chameleon sitting on a rock. A similar paperweight is pictured in Amalric Walter (1870-1959), by Keith Cummings, Kingswinford: Broadfield House Glass Museum, 2006, p. 19, cat. no. 16c.

French Art Nouveau Pâte-de-Verre Paperweight by Walter

"Papillon" Bowl by Gabriel Argy-Rousseau

A French Art Nouveau pâte de verre "Papillon" bowl by Gabriel Argy-Rousseau. The bowl has three Luna moths with brown bodies and textured green wings with red spots. They sit just below the bowl''s rim in a background of mottled purple and pink, fading to opalescence. A similar bowl is pictured in: "G. Argy Rousseau: Glassware as Art", by Janine Bloch-Dermant, London: Thames and Hudson, Ltd., 1991, p. 178, cat. no. 15.01.

'Papillon' Bowl by Gabriel Argy-Rousseau

"Langouste", Pâte de Verre Paperweight by Walter and Bergé.

A French Art Nouveau pâte de verre by Amalric Walter and Henri Bergé. The paperweight has a brown "Langouste" resting on a sculpted pâte de verre base. There is great detail in the claws and the sections of the tails. A similar paperweight is pictured in: Amalric Walter (1870-1959), by Keith Cummings, Kingswinford: Broadfield House Glass Museum, 2006, p. 49, cat. no. 77c.

'Langouste', Pâte de Verre Paperweight by Walter and Bergé.

"Poissons Dans Les Vagues" Vase by Gabriel Argy-Rousseau

A French Art Nouveau "Poissons dans les vagues" pâte de verre vase by Gabriel Argy-Rousseau. The vase depicts green and blue fish swimming through a clear textured surface over white waves and a deep blue base. A similar vase is featured in Bloch-Dermant, G. Argy-Rousseau, London 1991, cat. rais. 25.15. page 205. Also in Victor Arwas, Art Deco, New York, 1980, p. 266.

'Poissons Dans Les Vagues' Vase by Gabriel Argy-Rousseau

French Art Nouveau Cameo and Enamel Glass Vase by Emile Gallé

A French cameo and enameled glass vase by Emile Gallé. The vase features bleeding heart flowers with stems and leaves wrapped around and cascading down from the neck of the vase. The decoration is intricately enameled in greens, browns, white and red, all set against a vertically ribbed translucent green glass body. The vase is further enhanced with a textured pattern forming a ground for the cameo flowers. The top of the vase culminates in three sections. A similar vase is pictured in: Glass: Art Nouveau to Art Deco, by Victor Arwas, New York: Harry N. Abrams, Inc., 1987, p. 108

French Art Nouveau Cameo and Enamel Glass Vase by Emile Gallé

Gourd-Shaped Enameled Glass Vase by Portieux Vallerysthal

A French gourd-shaped enameled glass vase by Portieux Vallerysthal featuring squash blossoms and butterflies. The vase has an alternating clear and red background. The squash blossoms are yellow and orange. The leaves and applied vines are green. There are also gold butterflies and additional decorations in blue. A similar vase is pictured in: Glas des Art Nouveau: Die Sammlung Gerda Koepff, by Helmut Ricke and Eva Schmitt, Munich: Prestel, 1998, p. 172.

Gourd-Shaped Enameled Glass Vase by Portieux Vallerysthal

Art Nouveau Enameled and Etched Glass Vase by Daum

A French Art Nouveau enameled and etched glass vase by Daum. The curved stems of the organic scene are mimicked by the amphoric body of the vase. This bright vase is dominated by two planes of mottled glass, golden yellow on top of deep purple, which together create a landscape scene. The vase is decorated with etched and enameled flowers. The flora seem to grow from the base of the vase because of the landscape effect achieved in the ground behind the scene. At the base, the leaves and stems of the flowers appear as shadows, as they are only etched into the dark ground. Once the flora break through into the golden section of the vase, the etched scene is enhanced by bright, verdant green enamel, which gives way to vibrant red orchids. The scene is completed by a curious bee floating up to the blossom. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: Daum: Maitres Verriers, 1890-1980, by Noël Daum, Lausanne: Edita Denoël, 1980, p. 122.

Art Nouveau Enameled and Etched Glass Vase by Daum

Art Nouveau Enameled and Etched Glass Vase by Daum

A French Art Nouveau enameled and etched glass vase by Daum. This vase is an elliptic cylinder, a shape which Daum used because it lends itself to undulating and soft nature scenes. This bright vase is dominated by two planes of mottled glass, golden yellow on top of deep purple, which together create a landscape scene. The vase is decorated with etched and enameled flowers. The flora seem to grow from the base of the vase because of the landscape effect achieved in the ground behind the scene. At the base, the leaves and stems of the flowers appear as shadows, as they are only etched into the dark ground. Once the flora break through into the golden section of the vase, the etched scene is enhanced by bright, verdant green enamel, which gives way to vibrant red orchids. The scene is completed by a curious bee floating up to the blossom, ready to pollinate it. The presence of the bee implies that this springtime scene is not entirely completed in the vase, but that it is rather just a part of a fleeting moment rendered in glass. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: Daum: Maitres Verriers, 1890-1980, by Noël Daum, Lausanne: Edita Denoël, 1980, p. 122.

Art Nouveau Enameled and Etched Glass Vase by Daum

Art Nouveau "Crabe" vide-poche by Amalric Walter

A French "Crabe" pâte de verre vide-poche by Amalric Walter. The reddish-brown crab has spots of dark green, red and yellow on the top portion of its shell. It sits on a green wave with long strands of seaweed. A similar vide-poche is pictured in: Amalric Walter (1870-1959), by Keith Cummings, Kingswinford: Broadfield House Glass Museum, 2006, p. 18, cat. no. 15.

Art Nouveau 'Crabe' vide-poche by Amalric Walter

Art Nouveau Paperweight crab by Amalric Walter

A French Art Nouveau "Crabe" pâte de verre paperweight by Amalric Walter and Henri Bergé, decorated with a relief of a reddish-brown crab poised upon a bright contrast of green and yellow algae. A similar paperweight is pictured in: Amalric Walter (1870-1959), by Keith Cummings, Kingswinford: Broadfield House Glass Museum, 2006, p. 43, cat. no. 63b.

Art Nouveau Paperweight crab by Amalric Walter

Art Nouveau Enameled and Etched Glass Vase by Daum

A French Art Nouveau enameled and etched glass vase by Daum. This vase is a shape which Daum used because it lends itself to undulating and soft nature scenes. This bright vase is dominated by two planes of mottled glass, golden yellow on top of deep purple, which together create a landscape scene. The vase is decorated with etched and enameled flowers. The flora seem to grow from the base of the vase because of the landscape effect achieved in the ground behind the scene. At the base, the leaves and stems of the flowers appear as shadows, as they are only etched into the dark ground. Once the flora break through into the golden section of the vase, the etched scene is enhanced by bright, verdant green enamel, which gives way to vibrant red flowers. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: Daum: Maitres Verriers, 1890-1980, by Noël Daum, Lausanne: Edita Denoël, 1980, p. 122.

Art Nouveau Enameled and Etched Glass Vase by Daum

French Art Nouveau Pâte-de-Verre Vide-Poche by Walter

A French "Chameleon" pâte de verre vide-poche by Amalric Walter. This piece features an intricately textured green chameleon sitting on the edge of a yellow and orange dish. A similar vide-poche is pictured in: Amalric Walter (1870-1959), by Keith Cummings, Kingswinford: Broadfield House Glass Museum, 2006, p. 23, cat. no. 24.

French Art Nouveau Pâte-de-Verre Vide-Poche by Walter

Art Nouveau Enameled and Etched Glass Vase by Daum

A French Art Nouveau enameled and etched "Fleurs et Abeilles" glass vase by Daum. This vase is features a shape which Daum used because it lends itself to undulating and soft nature scenes. This bright vase is dominated by two planes of mottled glass, golden yellow on top of deep purple, which together create a landscape scene. The vase is decorated with etched and enameled flowers. The flora seem to grow from the base of the vase because of the landscape effect achieved in the ground behind the scene. At the base, the leaves and stems of the flowers appear as shadows, as they are only etched into the dark ground. Once the flora break through into the golden section of the vase, the etched scene is enhanced by bright, verdant green enamel, which gives way to vibrant red orchids. The scene is completed by a curious bee floating up to the blossom, ready to pollinate it. The presence of the bee implies that this springtime scene is not entirely completed in the vase, but that it is rather just a part of a fleeting moment rendered in glass. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: Daum: Maitres Verriers, 1890-1980, by Noël Daum, Lausanne: Edita Denoël, 1980, p. 122.

Art Nouveau Enameled and Etched Glass Vase by Daum

Art Nouveau Vase "Lyciet de Barbarie" by Argy-Rousseau

A French "Lyciet de Barbarie", pâte de verre vase by Gabriel Argy-Rousseau, depicting wolf berries against a vignette ground of amber, honey and white. cf. J. Bloch-Dermont, Les Pâtes de Verre G. Argy-Rousseau Catalogue Raisonné, Paris, 1990, p. 179, no. 17.01 for another vase of this model.

Art Nouveau Vase 'Lyciet de Barbarie' by Argy-Rousseau

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

A French Art Nouveau cameo glass vase by Daum, decorated with deeply wheel-carved green flowers on rose and pink ground, with applied foot. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: "Daum Nancy III" by Katharina Büttiker, Zurich: Galerie Katharina Büttiker, 2009, p. 88 ("Fern" Vase).

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

A French Art Nouveau cameo glass boat-form vase by Daum, featuring an applied wheel-carved pink flower and etched green leaves. A similar vase is pictured in: "Daum" by Clotilde Bacri, Noël Daum and Claude Pétry, Paris: Michel Aveline Éditeur, 1992, p. 91.

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

A French Art Nouveau wheel-carved cameo glass vase by Daum, featuring a decoration of blue flowers and light blue and grey stems and leaves on an opaque, mottled white and yellow ground. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: "Daum Frères: Maîtres Verriers, 1892-1935", by Katharina Büttiker-Weber, Zurich: Galerie Katharina Büttiker, 1986, cat. no. 114.

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

A French Art Nouveau wheel-carved and acid-etched cameo glass vase by Daum, featuring a carved mottled pink flower against an opaque textured ground. An identical vase is pictured in: "Daum: Collection du muse des Beaux-Arts de Nancy", Paris: Réunion des musées nationaux, 2000, cat. no. 219.

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

A French Art Nouveau cameo glass vase by Daum, featuring deep blue flowers on a mottled white and blue ground. The vase has both wheel-carving and martelé techniques. A similar vase is pictured in: "Daum Nancy III: Daum Frères – Verreries de Nancy, 1880-1930" by Katharina Büttiker, Zurich: Galerie Katharina Büttiker, 2009, p. 149.

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

A French Art Nouveau wheel-carved cameo glass pitcher by Daum, featuring an applied white flower and blades of grass against a mottled blue and white ground. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: "Daum Nancy: Maîtres Verriers" by Katharina Büttiker, Zurich: Galerie Katharina Büttiker, 2001, p. 125, cat. no. 76.

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass "Blooming Flower" Vase by Daum

A French Art Nouveau wheel-carved cameo glass vase by Daum, featuring a blooming flower in a deep blue, on an opaque white and mottled blue ground. A vase decorated in a similar style is pictured in: "Daum: Collection du muse des Beaux-Arts de Nancy", Paris: Réunion des musées nationaux, 2000, cat. no. 206.

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass 'Blooming Flower' Vase by Daum

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

A French Art Nouveau wheel-carved cameo glass vase by Daum, featuring blue flowers and dark green stems and leaves against a mottled white and blue ground. A vase decorated in a similar style is pictured in: "Daum: Collection du muse des Beaux-Arts de Nancy", Paris: Réunion des musées nationaux, 2000, cat. no. 224.

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

A French Art Nouveau satin-finished cameo glass vase, "Fleur de Coloquinte", by Daum, featuring the depiction of zucchini leaves and flowers in pale green, against a mottled opaque white and orange ground. The vase features the soufflé, or "blown-out" technique, making the leaves and flowers stand out from the shape of vase. Pictured in: "Daum - Maitres Verriers" by Edita Denoel, Edita S.A. Lausanne, 1980, p. 61.

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

French Art Nouveau "Snow Drop" Vase by Daum

A French Art Nouveau cameo glass "Snow Drop" vase by Daum, featuring carved light blue flowers on brown stems against a mottled white and blue ground. A similar vase is pictured in: "Daum Nancy: Maîtres Verriers" by Katharina Büttiker, Zurich: Galerie Katharina Büttiker, 2001, p. 68, cat. no. 43.

French Art Nouveau 'Snow Drop' Vase by Daum

French Art Nouveau Glass and Wood Footed Bowl by Emile Gallé

A French Art Nouveau glass and wood footed bowl by Emile Gallé, featuring a multicolored pinched-sided glass bowl in yellow, purple, and green. The bowl sits atop a carved walnut foot with openwork floral design and scrolled base. Pictured in "Meubles et Ensembles Style 1900" by Edith Mannoni, page 54. Provenance: Private collection of Mr. Robert S. Walker.

French Art Nouveau Glass and Wood Footed Bowl by Emile Gallé

French Art Nouveau Wheel Carved Cameo Glass Bottle

A French Art Nouveau wheel-carved cameo glass bottle with stopper. The bottle is decorated with an iris flower on an opalescent background. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: "Liberty: Natura e materia" by Donata Patrussi and Giovanni Renzi, Milan: Giunti, 2011, p. 85.

French Art Nouveau Wheel Carved Cameo Glass Bottle

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

A French Art Nouveau wheel-carved cameo glass vase by Daum, featuring a decoration of blue flowers and light blue/grey stems and leaves on an opaque, mottled white and yellow ground. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: "French Cameo Glass" by Berniece and Henry Blount, Des Moines: Dr.& Mrs. Henry Blount, Jr., 1968, p. 74, cat. no. 102.

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

A French Art Nouveau cameo glass vase by Daum, comprised of three pinkish-red poppy flowers wheel carved to show different stages of bloom, against a sky blue martelé technique background, with brown foliage and peach tones towards the bottom to represent the rising sun. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: "Daum: Maitres Verriers, 1890-1980", by Noël Daum, Lausanne: Edita Denoël, 1980, p. 115 (bottom left); and in: "Daum Nancy III: Daum Frères – Verreries de Nancy, 1880-1930", by Katharina Büttiker, Zurich: Galerie Katharina Büttiker, 2009, p. 118.

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

French Art Nouveau "Mimosa" Vase by Daum

An artistic French Art Nouveau mimosa vase by Daum featuring pink cameo overlay naturalistically modeled as a languid orchid. The influences of Japanese culture permeated fin de siècle Paris and could be felt in museums and in homes. Similarly, a nascent fascination with natural forms, found in publications of the day like Ernst Haeckle''s Kunstformen der Natur, manifested itself in a proliferation of flowers in French art and design and in an intese investigation of flora where artists rivaled botanists. This piece borders on abstraction. The Orchid, splayed open and surrounded by copious pollen spores, is imbued with feminine sensuality. The imaginative color palate and curving lines surpass the glass design standards of the day and render this piece a beguiling objet d''art.

French Art Nouveau 'Mimosa' Vase by Daum

French Art Nouveau Vase "Squash Blossom" by Daum

A French Art Nouveau clear glass vase with green cameo overlay in a squash blossom motif by Daum. The vase has deep green leaves, buds, flowers and a squash suspended from sinuous vines. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: "Daum: Collection du muse des Beaux-Arts de Nancy", Paris: Réunion des musées nationaux, 2000, cat. no. 224.

French Art Nouveau Vase 'Squash Blossom' by Daum

"Rose de France" Vase by Emile Gallé

A French Art Nouveau "Rose de France" vase by Emile Gallé. In 1870, Nancy, the home of Gallé was annexed by Germany as a result of the defeat of France in the Franco-Prussian war. Gallé chose to use the motif of the red rose, which only bloomed in the Mt. Saint-Quentin province of Lorraine as a symbol of his strident patriotism. In 1902 a vase from this series was presented to the Russian emperor as a prestigious gift from France. The vase shows Gallé''s innovative technique of glass marquetry which involved the incorporation of glass fragments of various thickness, shapes and colors into the still malleable glass. The multi-layering of glass and the use of metallic foils behind the glass make this piece so exceptional. A similar vase is pictured in: "Gallé", catalogue for the exhibition at le Musée du Luxembourg, Paris, November 1985-February 1986, "Paris: Éditions de la Réunion des muse nationaux", 1985, p. 149.

'Rose de France' Vase by Emile Gallé

"Irises" French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Burgun & Schverer

A French Art Nouveau "Irises" cameo glass vase by Burgun & Schverer with intercalaire decoration of lavender irises with green stems on a carved brilliant rose colored ground.

'Irises' French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Burgun & Schverer

"Fruit Branch" Vase by Emile Gallé

A French Art Nouveau mold blown cameo glass "Plum" vase by Emile Gallé. The applied blue and yellowish burgundy fruits rest on brown leaves, all on a yellow ground. A similar vase is pictured in: "Glass by Gallé", by Alastair Duncan and Georges de Bartha, New York: Harry N. Abrams, Inc., 1984, p. 196, plate 298.

'Fruit Branch' Vase by Emile Gallé

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Emile Gallé

A French Art Nouveau cameo glass vase depicting undulating brown fiddlehead ferns against a sun-spotted cream ground by Emile Gallé.

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Emile Gallé

French Art Nouveau Cylindrical Snail Vase by Daum

A French Art Nouveau "Vigne et Escargots" vase by Daum. The vase features grape clusters, vines and leaves in low relief with an an applied snail on one of the upper leaves, all against a mottled amber, pink, red, plum and white glass ground. Some of the grapes are also applied to to heighten the natural effects of the grape clusters. The scene is loosely landscape-based, with roots at the bottom and vines hanging down from the top, but the complex composition makes the piece entirely surreal. During the Art Nouveau period artists frequently used scenes from nature to convey human emotion, and vice versa. This autumnal piece is dark and mysterious, with gnarls, roots, and snails slithering on it. The motifs, patterns, and textures on the vase imply a time of transience, like the changing of the seasons. The "Vigne et Escargots" vase was produced in five layers beginning with a colorless glass core. The top two thirds of the intercalaire layer is colored with sulfure de cadmium inclusions and the bottom third is powdered with améthyste inclusions. After being cased with colorless glass, the glass was colored with translucent white inclusions in the top two thirds of the vase and améthyste in the bottom two thirds. Cirrus clouds at sunset were created with améthyste inclusions sprinkled atop burgundy inclusions. The base features a spattering of opaque verte de paris in ... clusions. To create a soot-like atmosphere, bistre inclusions were sprinkled about the grapes. The final layer consists of burgundy inclusions in the top third and améthyste, opaque verte de paris, and translucent white inclusions in the bottom two thirds. The vase was subsequently blown into an inverted baluster form with an undulating trefoil mouth and a splayed thick concave firing foot. In the constriction between the body and foot, the body was twisted counter-clockwise, while the constriction between body and neck was twisted clockwise. The striation created by the twisting of the intercalated layers create a sense of rising air. The bodies of the burgundy snails were subsequently created with drawn out upper and lower tentacles and fused with yellow powdered glass. For the snails'' shells, a core of colorless glass was coated in light gray-brown, dark gray-brown and black powdered glass and cased in another layer of colorless glass. The snail shells were fused to the body using this very powdered glass mixture. After the design was painted in wax upon the vase, the background and snails were acid-etched, allowing the intercalated layers to show through and the snails to be given a frosted appearance. The grape vine design and snails were subsequently hand carved, taking care to detail the snail shell''s bands. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: Daum Frères: Maîtres Verriers, 1892-1935, by Katharina Büttiker-Weber, Zurich: Galerie Katharina Büttiker, 1986, cat. no. 79.

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French Art Nouveau Cylindrical Snail Vase by Daum

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

A French Art Nouveau wheel-carved cameo glass vase by Daum, featuring green leaves and orange berries against a dark orange and mottled light green ground. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: "Daum" by Clotilde Bacri, Noël Daum and Claude Pétry, Paris: Michel Aveline Éditeur, 1992, p. 95.

French Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

Art Nouveau pâte-de-verre tray by Bergé and Walter,

A French Art Nouveau glass pâte-de-verre tray designed by Henri Bergé and executed by Amalric Walter, featuring yellow, orange and green striations. The tray is adorned with an ocean scene featuring a blue/green crab atop seaweed. A similar tray is pictured in "Almaric Walter (1870-1959)" by Keith Cummings, Kingswinford (UK): Broadfield House Glass Museum, 2006, page 73 plate 113.

Art Nouveau pâte-de-verre tray by Bergé and Walter,

Walter and Finot Glass Tray

A French Art Nouveau glass pâte-de-verre paperweight (press-papiers) designed by A. Finot and executed by Amalric Walter, cast in the form of a female nude with light brown hair reclining on a bed of leaves colored in various tones of yellowish/orange and green. A similar piece, entitled Femme couchée, is pictured in: La pâte de verre, by Nöel Daum, Paris: Edition Denöel, 1984, page 105, plate 129.

Walter and Finot Glass Tray

French Art Nouveau pâte-de-verre Vase, titled "Primeveres" by Rousseau,

A French Art Deco pâte-de-verre vase, titled "Primevères" (Primroses) by Gabriel Argy-Rousseau featuring purple and red organic organic decoration in relief agains a multi-colored ground. The vase is further decorated with a purple art deco ornamental upper border. Pictured in: "G.Argy-Rousseau: Les Pâtes de Verres, catalogue raisonné" by Janine Bloch-Dermant (Paris: Les Editions de l''Amateur, 1990), page 196, cat. no. 24.02.

French Art Nouveau pâte-de-verre Vase, titled 'Primeveres' by Rousseau,

"Femme au Pieuvre" French Art Nouveau Glazed Ceramic Inkwell by Rupert Carabin

A French Art Nouveau "Femme-Pieuvre," brown glazed ceramic inkwell by Rupert Carabin, wherein a woman ecstatically rips open the head of an octopus, spilling its ink. A beautiful play on an ancient mean of sourcing ink, this sculptures tranquility and solidity give it the aura of an ancient carving. Pictured in: "The Paris Salons 1895-1914, volume IV: Ceramics and Glass" by Alastair Duncan, p.76; "L''Oeuvre de Rupert Carabin 1862-1932, Catalogue D''exposition, Galerie du Luxembourg", 1974, pp.229 and 232; "Art Nouveau, Sculpture" by Alastair Duncan, Academy Edition, 1978, p.20; and in: "Le Modern style" by Laurence Buffet-Challié, p.74, plat 2.

'Femme au Pieuvre' French Art Nouveau Glazed Ceramic Inkwell by Rupert Carabin

French Art Nouveau Ceramic "Gourd" Vase by Ernest Bussière

A French Art Nouveau ceramic "Gourd" vase designed by Ernest Bussière and produced by Keller et Guérin, featuring stylized high-relief berries on the gourd-form, with green and purple enameled glazes. This vase was shown at the Exposition de l''Ecole de Nancy in Paris in 1903 (see The Paris Salons 1895-1915, Vol. IV: Ceramics and Glass, by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1998, p.261).

French Art Nouveau Ceramic 'Gourd' Vase by Ernest Bussière

French Art Nouveau Ceramic Vase by Bussière

A French Art Nouveau vase designed by Ernest Bussière and produced by Keller et Guérin, depicting two lizards in high relief wrapped around the rim. The vase features iridescent milky-green and mauve glazes with iridescent highlights. A similar vase was shown at the Exposition de l''Ecole de Nancy in Paris in 1903 (see The Paris Salons 1895-1915, Vol. IV: Ceramics and Glass, by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1998, p.260).

French Art Nouveau Ceramic Vase by Bussière

French Art Nouveau Ceramic Vase by Bussière

A French Art Nouveau vase by Keller and Guérin, from a design by Ernest Bussière, featuring the form of a closed flower in relief, with iridescent milky-green and mauve glazes. A similar vase was shown at the Exposition de l''Ecole de Nancy in Paris in 1903 (see The Paris Salons 1895-1915, Vol. IV: Ceramics and Glass, by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1998, p. 260).

 French Art Nouveau Ceramic Vase by Bussière

French Art Nouveau "Ombellifère" Ceramic Vase by Bussière

A French Art Nouveau iridescent glazed ceramic "Ombellifère" vase designed by Ernest Bussière and produced by Keller et Guérin, depicting ombelle blossoms in low relief, with six flowers whose stems extend away from the body of the vase to form delicate handles. A similar vase was shown at the Exposition de l''Ecole de Nancy in Paris in 1903 (see The Paris Salons 1895-1915, Vol. IV: Ceramics and Glass, by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1998, p.260).

French Art Nouveau 'Ombellifère' Ceramic Vase by Bussière

French Art Nouveau Ceramic Vase by Lachenal

A French Art Nouveau ceramic vase by Edmond Lachenal, featuring a stylistic depiction of leaves and vines with intricate piercing and carving in a graduated light green to green glaze. A similar vase is pictured in: "The Paris Salons 1895-1915, Vol. IV: Ceramics and Glass" by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1998, p. 266 (Grès vase, from La Société Nationale des Beaux-Arts, 1898); and in: Edmond Lachenal and His Legacy, by Martin Eidelberg and Claire Cass, New York: Jason Jacques Gallery Press, 2007, p. 81, cat. no. 12.

French Art Nouveau Ceramic Vase by Lachenal

French Art Nouveau Ceramic Vase by Bussière

A French Art Nouveau ceramic vase designed by Ernest Bussière and produced by Keller et Guerin. The vase is decorated with vegetal forms and has a glaze of pale green with traces of purple. A similar vase was shown at the Exposition de l''Ecole de Nancy in Paris in 1903 (see The Paris Salons 1895-1915, Vol. IV: Ceramics and Glass, by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1998, p.260).

French Art Nouveau Ceramic Vase by Bussière

French Art Nouveau Covered Porcelain Jar by de Feure

A French Art Nouveau covered porcelain jar designed by Georges de Feure and manufactured by Dufraisseix & Abbot, Limoges for Art Nouveau Bing. In the manner of de Feure''s renowned textiles, this piece is decorated with elegantly painted abstract floral and vegetal designs. Pictured in "The Paris Salons 1895-1914: Volume IV Ceramics & Glass" by Alastair Duncan, Page 159.

French Art Nouveau Covered Porcelain Jar by de Feure

Gallé Lamp – Celebration of Spring

An Art Nouveau cameo glass and Vienna Faience glazed figural lamp by Emile Gallé and Podany. The porcelain base is formed from three dancing women with outstretched arms holding a garland of pink roses. The blossoms echo the elegant dome-shaped rosy-hued shade. Both the inside and the outside of the shade are decorated with pink and green flowers in carved relief.

Gallé Lamp – Celebration of Spring

French Art Nouveau Walnut Vitrine

A French Art Nouveau walnut vitrine in ash and rosewood, featuring clemantis depicted in marquetry and deep carving. The vitrine has two lockable storage areas, each with a shelf, and two drawers that swing out from the body. There is also a shelf in the glass-fronted area near the top of the piece. The vitrine''s three legs are decorated with carved roots.

French Art Nouveau Walnut Vitrine

Art Nouveau Brooch with Aquamarine, Diamond and plique-à-jour Enamel by Lalique

"L''Anémone des Bois", A French Art Nouveau masterwork by René Lalique. Created in 1897, this 18 karat gold brooch showcases Lalique''s mastery of "plique-à-jour" enamel and also represents one of his earliest explorations of the art of molded glass. The brooch is accented by two oval faceted aquamarines weighing approximately 8.10 and 3.75 carats. More than any technical mastery or gemological import, the brooch is distinguished by its aesthetics and its deep meaning. This exquisite "Anémones des Bois" Brooch is an important example of René Lalique''s early work, predating his international debut at the Exposition Universelle of 1900. While his most prolific version of the anemone motif was the "Anémone couronnée" or poppy anemone, only a few choice pieces depict the "Anémone des Bois" or wood anemone. Unlike the poppy anemone, which grew in the balmy Mediterranean summer, the Anémone des Bois was known to the French as the harbinger of spring. While the forest floor lay dormant, the wood anemone alone reared its small head. Areas where the poor could pick this humble flower were demarcated with signs reading "Les Halles." The Anémone des Bois lined the border of the forest, enticing promenading couples into the forest''s embrace for an afternoon tryst. Pure white anemones thus became a symbol of virginal purity, mourning its imminent profanity by carnal desire. Lalique ... knew these traditions well from spending his childhood and summer holidays in the commune of Aÿ in Marne, located on a plateau overlooking the hillsides of Champagne. Two forests dominated the Marne landscape. To the west lay the old-growth forest of Sermiers, and to the east lay La forêt domaniale du Chêne à la Vierge. Promenading in the forest was a popular Sunday pastime for locals, especially as a way to escape the unrelenting dry heat of the noonday sun. Lalique expanded upon the theme of carnal desire, using the anemone to allegorize the stages of courtship. Our Anémone des Bois marked the beginning of this five-year-long exploration. With its petals slightly closed, the flower embodies the initial "rejet" or rejection of love. Fitting of a depiction of "rejet" the work epitomizes divine symmetry and youthful vigor. The flower''s posture relates to local wisdom: villagers could tell rain was coming when the Anémone des Bois closed its petals. By closing its petals, the flower rebuffs the words and sexual advances of the man. The second anemone in the series has its petals in disarray but receptive to potential pollination. An anemone in this position embodied "l''acceptation de l''amour" or the acceptance of love. The third anemone is the most sensual of the series, two anemones approach a passionate kiss, embodying the "consommation" or consummation. The final anemone in the series was completed in 1901. Titled "Mort de l''anémone" it is Lalique''s only representation of the blue anemone. Through the consummation, its petals have been dyed and its purity defiled. In macabre detail, the skeletal structure of the anemone''s rhizomes, or underground stems, are put on full view. The plant has been uprooted, and the encounter has finished. Contemporary novelist Émile Pouvillon related the death of the anemone to the act of deflowering in his 1895 short story "Les Anémones sont Mortes." The story''s heroine, a young country girl, loses herself in a bout of unrestrained euphoria with her lover. In their rolling about, "Anémones des Bois" are ripped out and bruised. At the 1898 Salon, the first Anémone des Bois was a critical triumph. Displayed with the second and third anemone in the series, the first was favored for its fully articulated plique-à-jour leaves. In the premier French decorative arts magazine Art et Décoration, the Anémone des Bois was praised for its "candid whiteness" and leaves that suggest "an infinitely complicated and precious architecture." Our Anémone des Bois is resplendent with the technical acuity that made Lalique known as the "master of modern bijoux (jewelry.)" In his early years, Lalique personally designed and modeled each mold for his creations in clay. These molds were then cast in iron and coated with a paste of resin and beeswax, hand-tooled for detail. The finish pressed-glass jewel was submerged in a bath of hydrofluoric acid, frosting the exterior. A thin layer of "jade green" powdered enamel was sifted and annealed onto the piece. The venation of each petal was painstakingly cut, revealing the plain crystal underneath. The warm glow of the gold backing gives the piece a breathtaking amber hue.

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Art Nouveau Brooch with Aquamarine, Diamond and plique-à-jour Enamel by Lalique

Silver, Enamel Picture Frame by William Hutton & Sons, Ltd.

An English Art Nouveau silver, enamel picture frame by William Hutton & Sons, Ltd. The frame features fabric covered wooden back with an easel support and with clear glass face over original silk lining. Founded in 1800 and in family hands for well over a century, William Hutton & Sons was one of the few English silversmiths to successfully adapt the Art Nouveau aesthetic to English tastes. Around 1900 they produced a collectible line of silver picture frames featuring whiplash lines and attenuated floral forms. Many of their frames echo the Celtic Revival style of Archibald Knox for Liberty & Company, even adopting the brilliant blue and green enamel for which Knox was so famous. PROVENANCE: Victor and Gretha Arwas, Editions Graphiques, London, circa 1983. Picture in Victor Arwas, Liberty Style, Tokyo, 1983, p. 118, no. S.24

Silver, Enamel Picture Frame by William Hutton & Sons, Ltd.

Silver, Enamel Picture Frame by William Hutton & Sons, Ltd.

An English Art Nouveau silver, enamel picture frame by William Hutton & Sons, Ltd. The frame features fabric covered wooden back with an easel support and with clear glass face. PROVENANCE Victor and Gretha Arwas, Editions Graphiques, London, circa 1983. Founded in 1800 and in family hands for well over a century, William Hutton & Sons was one of the few English silversmiths to successfully adapt the Art Nouveau aesthetic to English tastes. Around 1900 they produced a collectible line of silver picture frames featuring whiplash lines and attenuated floral forms. Many of their frames echo the Celtic Revival style of Archibald Knox for Liberty & Company, even adopting the brilliant blue and green enamel for which Knox was so famous.

Silver, Enamel Picture Frame by William Hutton & Sons, Ltd.

Silver, Enamel Picture Frame by William Hutton & Sons, Ltd.

An English Art Nouveau silver, enamel picture frame by William Hutton & Sons, Ltd. The frame features fabric covered wooden back with an easel support and with clear glass face. PROVENANCE: Victor and Gretha Arwas, Editions Graphiques, London, circa 1983. Founded in 1800 and in family hands for well over a century, William Hutton & Sons was one of the few English silversmiths to successfully adapt the Art Nouveau aesthetic to English tastes. Around 1900 they produced a collectible line of silver picture frames featuring whiplash lines and attenuated floral forms. Many of their frames echo the Celtic Revival style of Archibald Knox for Liberty & Company, even adopting the brilliant blue and green enamel for which Knox was so famous.

Silver, Enamel Picture Frame by William Hutton & Sons, Ltd.

Silver, Enamel Picture Frame by William Hutton & Sons, Ltd.

An English Art Nouveau silver picture frame with a floral decoration by William Hutton & Sons, Ltd. The frame features fabric covered wooden back with an easel support and with clear glass face. Circa 1903. Founded in 1800 and in family hands for well over a century, William Hutton & Sons was one of the few English silversmiths to successfully adapt the Art Nouveau aesthetic to English tastes. Around 1900 they produced a collectible line of silver picture frames featuring whiplash lines and attenuated floral forms. Many of their frames echo the Celtic Revival style of Archibald Knox for Liberty & Company, even adopting the brilliant blue and green enamel for which Knox was so famous.

Silver, Enamel Picture Frame by William Hutton & Sons, Ltd.

Silver, Enamel Picture Frame by William Hutton & Sons, Ltd.

An English Art Nouveau silver, enamel picture frame by William Hutton & Sons, Ltd. The frame features fabric covered wooden back with an easel support and with clear glass face. PROVENANCE: Victor and Gretha Arwas, Editions Graphiques, London, circa 1983. Founded in 1800 and in family hands for well over a century, William Hutton & Sons was one of the few English silversmiths to successfully adapt the Art Nouveau aesthetic to English tastes. Around 1900 they produced a collectible line of silver picture frames featuring whiplash lines and attenuated floral forms. Many of their frames echo the Celtic Revival style of Archibald Knox for Liberty & Company, even adopting the brilliant blue and green enamel for which Knox was so famous.

Silver, Enamel Picture Frame by William Hutton & Sons, Ltd.

Silver, Enamel Picture Frame by William Hutton & Sons, Ltd.

An English Art Nouveau silver, enamel picture frame by William Hutton & Sons, Ltd. The frame features fabric covered wooden back with an easel support and with clear glass face. PROVENANCE Victor and Gretha Arwas, Editions Graphiques, London, circa 1983. Founded in 1800 and in family hands for well over a century, William Hutton & Sons was one of the few English silversmiths to successfully adapt the Art Nouveau aesthetic to English tastes. Around 1900 they produced a collectible line of silver picture frames featuring whiplash lines and attenuated floral forms. Many of their frames echo the Celtic Revival style of Archibald Knox for Liberty & Company, even adopting the brilliant blue and green enamel for which Knox was so famous.

Silver, Enamel Picture Frame by William Hutton & Sons, Ltd.

Tiffany Studios New York ''Wisteria" Leaded Glass Window

An Art Nouveau ''Wisteria" leaded glass window by Tiffany Studios New York. Each blue wisteria panel is plated on the back side with various panels of confetti and striated glass forming individual petals of the wisteria flower, giving great depth of color. A large panel of striated amber glass is painted on the backside with a scenic design of a tree and pond, which is then plated over with a red panel creating great depth in the window. Wisteria flowers and vines are also the subject of a window pictured in: Tiffany Windows: The indispensable book on Louis C. Tiffany''s masterworks, by Alastair Duncan, New York: Simon and Schuster, 1980, fig. 96.

Tiffany Studios New York ''Wisteria' Leaded Glass Window

Art Nouveau Bronze and Favrile Glass Table Candelabrum by Tiffany.

An American Art Nouveau bronze and favrile glass mounted table candelabrum by Tiffany Studios New York. The candelabrum has six arms. Each candle holder is decorated with green favrile jewels. A similar candelabrum is pictured in: Alastair Duncan, "Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models", Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club Ltd., 2007, p. 385, plate 1571.

Art Nouveau Bronze and Favrile Glass Table Candelabrum by Tiffany.

Tiffany Studios New York "Tel el Amarna" Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York "Tel el Amarna" Favrile glass vase with an iridescent blue body and a brilliant cobalt blue foot and rim featuring an Egyptian-inspired grey and white "Tel el Amarna" motif. Similary decorated vases are pictured in: The Art of Louis Comfort Tiffany, by Tessa Paul, New York: Exeter Books, 1987, p. 75.

Tiffany Studios New York 'Tel el Amarna' Vase

Tiffany Studios New York "Tel el Amarna" Glass Pedestal Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York Art Nouveau Favrile glass pedestal vase. Iridescent sepia body with iridescent gold shoulders featuring a sage-green and beige ''Tel el Armana" motif. A similar vase is pictured in: Louis Comfort Tiffany at Tiffany & Co., by John Loring, New York: Harry N. Abrams, Inc., 2002, p. 160.

Tiffany Studios New York 'Tel el Amarna' Glass Pedestal Vase

Glass "Paperweight" Tiffany Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York Art Nouveau ''paperweight'' glass vase. White blossoms with pink millefiori florets sprinkled throughout a green pulled-leaf motif, all featured on a clear background. The paperweight technique involved fusing thin rods of transparent glass in a variety of colors. The resulting thicker rod was cut into thin pieces and were then worked into clear glass. A vase with similar decoration is pictured in: Louis Comfort Tiffany at Tiffany & Co., by John Loring, New York: Harry N. Abrams, Inc., 2002, p. 158.

Glass 'Paperweight' Tiffany Vase

Tiffany Studios New York "Cypriote" Glass Vase

An Art Nouveau "Cypriote" glass vase by Tiffany Studios New York. The vase has iridescent gold over a brown base. The iridescence includes hints of pinks and blues. Provenance: PROPERTY OF DR. JEROME AND MRS. GAYLE LANDY Cypriote is a textured glass achieved at Tiffany Glass and Decorating Company by rolling glass over a marble or iron surface covered with pulverized bits of the same glass. Its iridescence and bubbles resembled the decomposed surface of Roman glass discovered during archeological explorations on the island of Cyprus, hence its name. A similar vase is pictured in: The Art Glass of Louis Comfort Tiffany, by Paul E. Doros, New York: The Vendome Press, 2013, p. 108.

Tiffany Studios New York 'Cypriote' Glass Vase

Tiffany Studios "Grapevine" Picture Frame

An Art Nouveau gilt bronze and glass "Grapevine" picture frame by Tiffany Studios New York with an oval aperture. A similar frame is pictured in: Tiffany Desk Sets, by William R. Holland, Atglen, PA: Schiffer, 2008, p. 95, figure 3-39.

Tiffany Studios 'Grapevine' Picture Frame

Tiffany Studios "Pine Needle" Picture Frame

An Art Nouveau gilt bronze "Pine Needle" picture frame by Tiffany Studios New York. The frame is rectangular with an oval center display and decorated in gilt bronze over mottled amber glass. A similar frame is pictured in: Tiffany Desk Sets, by William R. Holland, Atglen, PA: Schiffer, 2008, p. 63, fig. 2-44.

Tiffany Studios 'Pine Needle' Picture Frame

Tiffany Studios New York Art "Peacock Eye" Glass Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York Art Nouveau "Peacock Eye" glass vase by Louis Comfort Tiffany. Decorated with blue peacock eye feathers on an iridescent blue and green ground.

Tiffany Studios New York Art 'Peacock Eye' Glass Vase

Tiffany Studios New York Centerpiece

A Tiffany Studios New York Art Nouveau centerpiece, featuring deep-blue green iridescent Favrile glass decorated with a iridescent green leaf and vine decoration. The centerpiece has a removable "frog" to hold cut flowers. A similar centerpiece is pictured in: Tiffany Favrile Art Glass, by Moise S. Steeg, Jr., Atglen, PA: Schiffer, 1997, p. 149.

Tiffany Studios New York Centerpiece

Tiffany Studios Scarab and Mosaic Box

A Tiffany Studios New York "Scarab" mosaic and gilt bronze covered box by Louis Comfort Tiffany. This round box is decorated with vivid mosaics of red, yellow, orange, green, turquoise blue and black. The cover has three applied favrile glass scarab beetles. The scarabs confirm Tiffany''s fascination for Egyptian archeological discoveries and are a fine expression of his inspiration. Louis Comfort Tiffany first traveled to Egypt in 1872, two years after the opening of the Suez Canal and nearing the height of the ensuing American "Eyptomania." Tiffany was immediately taken with the ancient cultural legacies and starkly exotic landscape of 19th Century Egypt, and upon his return to New York he devoted himself to the rendering of several large scale oil paintings depicting the landscape, ancient wonders and then modern architecture of Cairo and the surrounding area. From that point onward the aesthetic language of ancient Egypt was never far from Tiffany''s mind, and it would appear in various motif forms in various works, for the rest of his artistic career. Those works that demonstrate Tiffany''s great passion and careful study of ancient Egypt are now considered among the rarest and most collectible of his oeuvre. After a second Nile River Cruise in 1908 Tiffany resolved to celebrate his long enchantment with all things Egyptian with a Fete that would be written about for d ... ecades to come. Invitations to the strictly Egyptian themed evening were on aged parchment in both hieroglyphs and English, and hand delivered to each of the bash''s 400 guests. Each of the attendees had to submit their costumes to a strict guidelines of authenticity by a committee comprised of Egyptologists and authorities on costume art. Egyptian inspired music, composed by Theodore Steinway was performed by the New York Philharmonic Orchestra as Pedro de Cordoba playing Marc Antony brought gifts of Favrile glass to a posing Cleopatra. Tiffany''s son-in-laws were dressed as Roman lictors, while his daughters were adorned with rare scarab objects from Tiffany''s personal collection fashioned as jewelry. Robert De Forest, the famed president of the Metropolitan Museum of American Art, arrived as the Maharaj of Punjab, John D. Rockefeller attended dressed as a pharaoh and Egyptian beauty queens wearing gigantic scarab wings served them North African fare. Tiffany spared no detail and no expense to recreate the opulence of ancient Egyptian courts, and created many decorative arts especially for the occasion. Tiffany was particularly interested in the importance of the scarab beetle in Egyptian mythology, and sparingly employed decorative depictions of the insect in his works, most probably due to his understanding of the supreme and sacred nature of the motif. However, those works that did include scarabs executed in the ancient Egyptian style are considered of special personal importance to Tiffany, and are especially important to find in Tiffany collections. The Egyptian name for the beetle is derived from the verb "to be created" or "to come into the world." The Egyptians considered the beetle to be the incarnation of the creator god, who had regenerated himself cyclically. The beetle was thus understood as a potent symbol of rebirth, and was tied to understandings of the daily rising sun.

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Tiffany Studios Scarab and Mosaic Box

Tiffany Studios New York Favrile Sprinkler Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York decorated Favrile glass rose water sprinkler vase. The vase is iridescent gold, with undertones of pink and blue. This "gooseneck" design is considered one of Tiffany''s most original and delicate forms, with a molded peacock feather decoration that circles the bulbous portion of the vase and continues along the mouth until fading in the neck. A similar sprinkler is pictured in: Tiffany Favrile Art Glass, by Moise S. Steeg, Jr., Atglen, PA: Schiffer Publishing, Ltd., 1997, p. 33.

Tiffany Studios New York Favrile Sprinkler Vase

Tiffany Studios New York Enamel Box

A Tiffany Studios New York "Olive" covered box by, executed by the Enamelware Department of Stonebridge Glass Company, New York. This fabulous masterpiece is composed of enameled copper. The cover is decorated with olives, purple-brown copper branches and deep green leaves. From Paul Doros: "This enameled covered box clearly reveals the quality and innovative artistry that led to the company winning a gold medal at that world''s fair. It is of a familiar form but features an unusual motif and palette. Both the cover and slightly ribbed body have a repoussé design of ripening olives and pendant leaves on sinuous branches, one of them forming an irregular sculptural handle. The gold background is particularly noteworthy. Most Tiffany enamels of this type have a ground in shades of either red or blue. The background used in this object is perfectly suited, as it suggests olives ripening under a warm, golden sun. Hints of gold glimmer and sparkle through the slightly iridescent aubergine and purple olives, as well as the green leaves, adding to the illusion. It was pieces such as this one that caused contemporary critics to proclaim Tiffany''s enamels as "rare works of art" as well as "visions of delight." Paul Doros is former curator of glass at the Chrysler Museum of Art (Norfolk, Virginia) and author of The Art Glass of Louis Comfort Tiffany (New York: Vendome Press) ... , 2013. PROVENANCE Parke-Bernet Galleries Inc., New York Private Collection, New York, circa 1965 Thence by descent to the present owners LITERATURE Martin Eidelberg and Nancy McClelland, Behind the Scenes of Tiffany Glassmaking: The Nash Notebooks, New York, 2001, pp. 21 and 178 (for the model executed in pottery) Alastair Duncan, Louis C. Tiffany: The Garden Museum Collection, Woodbridge, Suffolk, 2004, pp. 466 (for the model executed in pottery) and 471 (for the model executed in bronze pottery)

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Tiffany Studios New York Enamel Box

Tiffany Studios New York "Tel el Amarna" Vase

A rare and monumental Tiffany Studios New York "Tel el Amarna" Favrile glass vase with an iridescent cobalt blue body and a brilliant turquoise blue foot and rim. Vases with zigzag decoration such as this have been commonly called "Tel el Amarna" after the decorative motifs of ancient Egypt. However, recent research has shown that Tiffany actually intended these vases to be referred to as "Byzantine", with the exception of vases featuring the brilliant blue color associated with the blue faience of the Eighteenth Dynasty of Amarna, Egypt, circa 1346 BC. This is the largest and most brilliantly colored vase of this genre that Macklowe Gallery has had the privilege of owning in our 50 years specializing in the artistic glass of Louis Comfort Tiffany. Similary decorated vases are pictured in: "The Art of Louis Comfort Tiffany", by Tessa Paul, New York: Exeter Books, 1987, p. 75.

Tiffany Studios New York 'Tel el Amarna' Vase

Pair of Gilt "Six-Light Lily" Tiffany Lamps

A pair of Tiffany Studios New York "Six-Light Lily" Favrile glass and gilt bronze lamps. Although American, Tiffany participated fully in the French Art Nouveau movement. He exhibited at the World''s Fairs in Paris and Turin, where his "Lily" lamp won widespread acclaim. Praised for its elegance, the "Lily" has been called the "Aristocrat of the Garden". A similar lamp is pictured in: Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models, by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988, p. 57, plate 197.

Pair of Gilt 'Six-Light Lily' Tiffany Lamps

"Eighteen-Light Lily" Tiffany Lamp

A Tiffany Studios New York Favrile glass and patinated bronze "Eighteen-light Lily" lamp with 18 golden iridescent glass "Lily" shades suspended over a patinated bronze "Lily Pad" base. Tiffany took this model to the Paris and Turin World''s Fairs around the turn of the century, where the American lamp made waves in the French Art Nouveau movement. Praised for its elegance, the Tiffany "Lily" has been called the "Aristocrat of the Garden". This particular lamp is of special historical importance, even when compared with other models of the same make. Because it is one of the earliest examples of the "Eighteen-Light Lily" it is outfitted with shades of particular delicacy and iridescence that would have accommodated the weak light from the then newly invented light bulbs. A similar lamp is pictured in: Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models, by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988, p. 80, plate 313.

'Eighteen-Light Lily' Tiffany Lamp

Tiffany Studios New York American "Lava" Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York American Art Nouveau "Lava" vase by Louis Comfort Tiffany. A visit to Mount Etna in Sicily during one of its eruptions is said to have inspired Tiffany to capture in glass the force and beauty of the molten volcanic flows and basaltic rock formations that he observed there. The free-form abstract drippings of gold molten glass and the speckled blue and gold ground recreate the naturalistic effects of flowing lava and make this vase an exceptional example of the form. Provenance: The Garden Museum Collection, Matsue, Japan and Important Art Nouveau from the Private Collection of Lloyd & Barbara Macklowe at Sotheby''s 1995 This vase is pictured in: "A Selection of 300 Works From Louis C. Tiffany Garden Museum", by Takeo Horiuchi, Japan: Greco Corporation Fine Art Department, 2001, p. 250. A similar piece is also in the collection of the Chrysler Museum in Norfolk, VA: "The Tiffany Collection of the Chrysler Museum at Norfolk", by Paul E. Doros, Richmond, VA: W. M. Brown & son, Inc., 1978, p. 70, plate 69. Also pictured in "Tiffany Favrile Glass and the Quest of Beauty", by Martin Eidelberg, page 29, plate 28.

Tiffany Studios New York American 'Lava' Vase

Tiffany Studios New York Glass and Bronze Gimbal Candlestick with Snuffer

A Tiffany Studios New York favrile and turtleback tile glass and patinated bronze gimbal candlestick with snuffer. The shade features green pulled feathers on a cream background. It sits above a round iridescent leaded tuttleback glass ball. A similar piece is pictured in: Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models, by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antiques Collectors'' Club Ltd., p. 377, cat. 1544, #1208.

Tiffany Studios New York Glass and Bronze Gimbal Candlestick with Snuffer

Tiffany Studios "Cypriote" Miniature Vase

A Tiffany Studios New York glass "Cypriote" vase, featuring a mottled and multi-textured lava-like finish, with an uneven border. The vase has a dark background with iridescent green, blue, purple and metallic swirls. Cypriote is a textured glass achieved at Tiffany Glass and Decorating Company by rolling glass over a marble or iron surface covered with pulverized bits of the same glass. Its iridescence and bubbles resembled the decomposed surface of Roman glass discovered during archeological explorations on the island of Cyprus, hence its name. Lava glass evolved from Cypriote glass by using thicker, brighter glass and dripping golden glass irregularly over the surface. A similar vase is pictured in: "The Art of Glass: Art Nouveau to Art Deco" by Victor Arwas, London: Andreas Papadakis, 1996, p. 40, plate 50.

Tiffany Studios 'Cypriote' Miniature Vase

"Flower Form" Glass Vase by Tiffany

An American Art Nouveau Favrile glass "Flower Form" vase by Tiffany Studios New York. The upper portion of the vase is ornamented with green pulled feather decoration, imitative of leaves, against a graduated iridescent gold and rose colored ground and sits atop a translucent green stem that extends upwards from an iridescent gold foot. Favrile is the trade name Tiffany gave to his blown art glass. The name derives from the Latin word fabrilis, meaning "made by hand." The technique was developed at Tiffany Furnaces in the mid-1890s using filaments from batches of differently colored glass and working the material while the glass was still molten. Ornamentation was added before the piece had its final shape, so that the decoration became fully integrated into the vessel. Favrile glass vases in the shapes of stylized flowers were among the earliest creations of the Tiffany Glass and Decorating Company, forerunner of Tiffany Studios. Initial examples of this technique date from approximately 1894, although later pieces show greater refinement. Flower forms have great variety in stem length and rim shape.

'Flower Form' Glass Vase by Tiffany