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Marcus & Co. Art Nouveau Opal and Gold Stick Pin

An American Art Nouveau 18 karat gold stick pin with enameling and black opal by Marcus & Co. The stick pin has a cabochon opal surrounded with four enamel side sections decorated with gold relief arabesque designs. The multi-generational New York firm of Marcus & Co was founded by an ambitious young German immigrant who had trained at a prominent Dresden court jeweler. In 1892, after working with Charles Lewis Tiffany, Hermann Marcus and his sons William and George together set up a business that soon became a glittering New York society institution renowned not only for its superb diamonds, colored stones and pearls, but also its instantly recognizable, original design style. The firm produced great jewels in the Art Nouveau and Arts & Crafts sensibility, with George, the artist/designer, drawing inspiration from sources as diverse and exotic as the contemporary French masters, the Moghuls and Maharajahs, the garland style of the Ancien Regime, and the genius of Renaissance goldsmiths. George''s distinctive, confident hand was always discernible in Marcus creations. Working as a team with George, his brother William was a gem and pearl connoisseur who travelled the world hunting fine gem material, including purchasing the entire production of never-before-seen black opal in Lightning Ridge Australia in 1908. Marcus exhibited at the 1900 Exposition Universelle in Paris, and ... their work won prizes at the prestigious Society of Arts & Crafts of Boston. The firm and family were well-known for their charitable activities and promotion of young jewelers such as Raymond Yard.

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Marcus & Co. Art Nouveau Opal and Gold Stick Pin

Bronze Nude lighted Sconce on Marquetry Easel by Georges Flamand

A French Art Nouveau bronze draped female nude in the form of a two-light sconce by Georges Flamand. The draped maiden, in a two-color patina, is supporting two lighting elements mounted on a wooden marquetry easel with a floral and thistle motif.

Bronze Nude lighted Sconce on Marquetry Easel by Georges Flamand

Marcus & Company Art Nouveau Peridot, Diamond, Gold and Enamel Ring

An American Art Nouveau gold, peridot, diamond and enamel ring by Marcus & Co. The unique Renaissance Revival motif features green enameled 18-karat gold, two round-cut peridots totaling approximately 1.60 carats, and 30 round-cut diamonds that weigh approximately 1.20 carats. The Renaissance Revival design influence is carried onto the ring shank, culminating in a diamond set into the ring shank bottom. This striking ring demonstrates the color sensitivity of the famed American firm, Marcus & Co. It is also a rare and interesting Art Nouveau example of a Toi et Moi ring, or a ring in which two stones or two types of stones dynamically cross over each other symbolically representing a romantic union. The Toi et Moi rings were popularized by no less than Napoleon Bonaparte when he scandalously proposed to his soon to be Empress, Josephine. The multi-generational New York firm of Marcus & Co was founded by an ambitious young German immigrant who had trained at a prominent Dresden court jeweler. In 1892, after working with Charles Lewis Tiffany, Hermann Marcus and his sons William and George together set up a business that soon became a glittering New York society institution renowned not only for its superb diamonds, colored stones and pearls, but also its instantly recognizable, original design style. The firm produced great jewels in the Art Nouveau and Arts & Crafts s ... ensibility, with George, the artist/designer, drawing inspiration from sources as diverse and exotic as the contemporary French masters, the Moghuls and Maharajahs, the garland style of the Ancien Regime, and the genius of Renaissance goldsmiths. George''s distinctive, confident hand was always discernible in Marcus creations. Working as a team with George, his brother William was a gem and pearl connoisseur who travelled the world hunting fine gem material, including purchasing the entire production of never-before-seen black opal in Lightning Ridge Australia in 1908. Marcus exhibited at the 1900 Exposition Universelle in Paris, and their work won prizes at the prestigious Society of Arts & Crafts of Boston. The firm and family were well-known for their charitable activities and promotion of young jewelers such as Raymond Yard.

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Marcus & Company Art Nouveau Peridot,  Diamond, Gold and Enamel Ring

Ostertag Paris Art Deco Diamond and Platinum Double Clip Brooch

A French Art Deco platinum double clip brooch with diamonds by Ostertag. The double clip brooch has 182 round and baguette-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of 9.50 carats, G/H/I color, VS/SI clarity. Original bill of sale from M.S.Arnold Ostertag. The clips are designed in a stylized wing motif. Signed box, ''Paris Arnold Ostertag''. The firm of Ostertag, founded in the 1920''s by Swiss-born, Arnold Ostertag (1883 – c.1940) is said to have created objects that rivaled the creations of the more celebrated houses of Cartier, Van Cleef & Arpels, and Boucheron. The Ostertag Maison was located in Paris, at number 16 Place Vendôme, near other important jewelry houses of the day. During the 1920s and 1930s, Ostertag was especially known for jewelry and objets d''art based on Asian and Indian designs. One style, known as Tutti Frutti, popular from the early 1920s to the late 1930s, combined influences from Islamic religious architecture and so-called Hindu or Indian styles. Emeralds, carved rubies, and sapphires – often imported from worldwide locations – were interspersed with diamonds. The jewels were crafted into unique pieces using the highest known techniques of the day and arranged into flowers and leaves, studded with berries and fruit. Many of the creations were purchased by an elite clientele that ranged from empresses, kings, and dukes to celebrities. Ostert ... ag was among the renowned Parisian jewelers, led by Cartier and Mauboussin, that were invited to commission masterpieces in collaboration with other respected and well-known jewelry and timepiece houses of the day. Ostertag''s objets d''art and decorative clocks made by the revered clockmaker, George Verger, are jeweled works of art. In 1929 Ostertag exhibited jewelry and objets d''art at the Musée Galliera. Ostertag''s Paris shop continued until late 1939, when he left for America, where he died around 1940. His biographers, Proddow and Healy, write that Ostertag regularly visited America in years between World Wars I and II. They write that he would come to New York in mid-October, spend two months in Los Angeles, then visit Florida, and return to Paris via Cannes at Easter. After two months in Paris, he spent July in Deauville, August in the south of France, and September in Biarritz. At the onset of World War II, Maison Ostertag closed its doors forever. Discussed in Art Deco Jewelry by Sylvie Raulet, Rizzoli, 1985.

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Ostertag Paris Art Deco Diamond and Platinum Double Clip Brooch

Marcus & Co. Early-20th Century Diamond, Natural Pearl, Platinum and Gold Ring

An American Early 20th Century platinum and 18 karat gold ring with diamonds and natural pearl by Marcus & Co. The ring has 3 old mine-cut diamonds with an approximate weight of 1.25, 1.35 and 1.05 carats, L/M color, SI clarity respectively, and 10 old European-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of .10 carat. The center of this ring is a natural pearl measuring 7.91 x 7.86 mm. Gemological Institute of America Certificate stating natural saltwater pearl #2155277139. The multi-generational New York firm of Marcus & Co was founded by an ambitious young German immigrant who had trained at a prominent Dresden court jeweler. In 1892, after working with Charles Lewis Tiffany, Hermann Marcus and his sons William and George together set up a business that soon became a glittering New York society institution renowned not only for its superb diamonds, colored stones and pearls, but also its instantly recognizable, original design style. The firm produced great jewels in the Art Nouveau and Arts & Crafts sensibility, with George, the artist/designer, drawing inspiration from sources as diverse and exotic as the contemporary French masters, the Moghuls and Maharajahs, the garland style of the Ancien Regime, and the genius of Renaissance goldsmiths. George''s distinctive, confident hand was always discernible in Marcus creations. Working as a team with George, his brother Wil ... liam was a gem and pearl connoisseur who travelled the world hunting fine gem material, including purchasing the entire production of never-before-seen black opal in Lightning Ridge Australia in 1908. Marcus exhibited at the 1900 Exposition Universelle in Paris, and their work won prizes at the prestigious Society of Arts & Crafts of Boston. Plique-a-jour enamel was an art in which Marcus & Co. excelled, creating jewels with unprecedented three-dimensional depth in this medium. The firm and family were well-known for their charitable activities and promotion of young jewelers such as Raymond Yard.

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Marcus & Co. Early-20th Century Diamond, Natural Pearl, Platinum and Gold Ring

Van Cleef & Arpels/Georges Lenfont Diamond and Gold Curb Link Necklace

A French 18 karat gold necklace with diamonds by Van Cleef & Arpels/Georges Lenfont. The necklace has 1400 round cut pave set diamonds with an approximate total weight of 47.00 carats, F/G color, VS clarity. The necklace is composed of 37 graduated curb links.

Van Cleef & Arpels/Georges Lenfont Diamond and Gold Curb Link Necklace

Marsh & Co. Mid-20th Century Jadeite Jade, Diamond, Steel and Platinum Ring

An American Mid-20th Century oxidized steel, platinum, jadeite and diamond ring, by G. T. Marsh & Co. The ring set with a marquise-shape jadeite cabochon, flanked by lines of 8 round diamonds with an approximate total weight of .16 carat. G.T. Marsh & Co. was a San Francisco-based Asian art dealer known for their distinctive jewels. As a boy infatuated with Asian culture, George Turner Marsh apprenticed with a Japanese tea merchant, remaining there alone while his Australian family continued on to San Francisco, where they settled. Young George used his time in Yokohama to become conversant in Japanese art and aesthetics, and after re-joining his family, established an Asian art gallery using the expertise he had acquired. During the 1930s, 40s and 50s, his family began designing jewelry based on their interpretation of masterful Japanese metalwork together with the favored gems of the region, jadeite, coral and pearls. The firm''s unique steel jewelry was produced by bluing and sandblasting techniques, which gave the metal its matte finish, an extraordinary base for its sparkling, gleaming gems.

Marsh & Co. Mid-20th Century Jadeite Jade, Diamond, Steel and Platinum Ring

Marianne Ostier Mid-20th Century Diamond and Gold Earrings

A pair of 18 karat gold earrings with diamonds by Marianne Ostier. The earrings contain 32 round-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of 2.60 carats, G/H color, VS clarity. The earrings are composed of twisted gold wire forming a cone shape which is topped with a cluster of diamonds. "A Collection of Jewelry, Designed by Marianne Ostier Ostier, Inc., one of New York''s leading jewelers dealing precious-stone jewelry of original design and superb custom craftsmanship, was closed in September of this year [1969], following the death of its co-founder, Oliver Ostier. The present sale offers the entire stock of this distinguished firm. All pieces are original designs of Marianne Ostier, co-founder with her late husband of the firm and an internationally famed designer of jewelry. "Of the decision to close the business, Marianne Ostier said: With the passing of my husband, I have had to devote more and more of my efforts to administrative duties. These demands of my time can no longer be met without artistic compromise which to me is unacceptable. "Representing the third generation of court jewelers in Austria, Oliver Ostier came to America following the Anschluss of 1938. Shortly thereafter he founded the firm of Ostier, Inc., with his wife Marianne, a talented painter and sculptress as well as an artist in the design of jewelry. Author of Jewels and the woman , the ... basic primer of the art of wearing jewelry, Marianne Ostier''s designs became major jewelry fashions and classics of modern designed jewelry. She is responsible for numerous innovations, such as the pincushion clip, the famed skin pin and free-form jewelry; she pioneered in abstract designs for jewelry and, as a sculptress, brought a new dimension to her work in jewelry design. For many years, Mrs. Ostier won the Diamond U.S.A. Award and the Diamond International Award for design excellence. The first life-time member elected to the Diamonds-International Academy, the hall of fame for modern jewelry designers, she represented the United States at the Art in Precious Jewelry exhibition at the Finch College Museum of Art in 1966, which featured the work of the foremost designers of ten countries. Among the artists, in addition to Mrs. Ostier, were Georges Braques and Salvador Dali."

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Marianne Ostier Mid-20th Century Diamond and Gold Earrings

George Verger French Retro Diamond, Ruby, Rose Quartz, Platinum and Gold Bracelet Cuff

An important French Retro, 18-karat rose gold bangle bracelet with diamonds, rubies, and rose quartz, by Verger Frères. The hinged bangle bracelet is designed with terminals of rose quartz sphere clusters, each set with circular-cut rubies, approximate total weight 1.65 carats, flanked by old mine-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of 1.30 carats, further highlighted by calibré-cut rubies with an approximate total weight of 1 carat. The Verger workshop was a successful, behind-the-scenes force creating jewels for Boucheron, Cartier, Tiffany, and Van Cleef & Arpels. Unlike those of many manufacturing jewelers, who merely produced work to order, Verger''s own original designs were particularly valued and sought after by these great Parisian Maison. Verger are known for their magnificent clocks featuring strongly defined shapes, stylized lines and global inspiration. For the Haute Joaillerie he created elaborate fancies of form and color contrast, as we see here in this important rose gold bracelet.

George Verger French Retro Diamond, Ruby, Rose Quartz, Platinum and Gold Bracelet Cuff

French Art Nouveau Ceramic Vase by de Feure

A French Art Nouveau porcelain vase by Georges de Feure, featuring a blue and pink floral decoration on a glazed cream-white ground. Made for La Maison Art Nouveau Bing. Similar vase in the collection of the Musée des Arts Décoratifs. Similar vases pictured in: "Art Nouveau Bing: Paris Style 1900" by Gabriel Weisberg, p. 204, pl. 198.

French Art Nouveau Ceramic Vase by de Feure

French Art Nouveau Covered Porcelain Jar by de Feure

A French Art Nouveau covered porcelain jar designed by Georges de Feure and manufactured by Dufraisseix & Abbot, Limoges for Art Nouveau Bing. In the manner of de Feure''s renowned textiles, this piece is decorated with elegantly painted abstract floral and vegetal designs. Pictured in "The Paris Salons 1895-1914: Volume IV Ceramics & Glass" by Alastair Duncan, Page 159.

French Art Nouveau Covered Porcelain Jar by de Feure

Marsh Mid-20th Century Steel and Pearl Dress Set

A Mid-20th Century patinated steel and gold dress set with cultured pearls by G.T. Marsh. The full dress set is composed of double sided cuff links, three dress studs and two dress buttons. The set is in a square geometric step motif with a pearl at the center. In the original signed Marsh box. G.T. Marsh & Co. was a San Francisco-based Asian art dealer known for their distinctive jewels. As a boy infatuated with Asian culture, George Turner Marsh apprenticed with a Japanese tea merchant, remaining there alone while his Australian family continued on to San Francisco, where they settled. Young George used his time in Yokohama to become conversant in Japanese art and aesthetics, and after re-joining his family, established an Asian art gallery using the expertise he had acquired. During the 1930s, 40s and 50s, his family began designing jewelry based on their interpretation of masterful Japanese metalwork together with the favored gems of the region, jadeite, coral and pearls. The firm''s unique steel jewelry was produced by bluing and sandblasting techniques, which gave the metal its matte finish, an extraordinary base for its sparkling, gleaming gems. "Marsh had a jeweler that worked exclusively for them. He was Italian, but he also liked shotguns and, because of his interest in shotguns, he had an interest in iron and metallurgy and what they did to rifles and shotguns t ... o keep them from rusting. And the Marsh''s jewelry is steel that''s been treated with gun bluing. He sandblasted the steel before he gun blued it, that gives it this marvelous matte finish. And nowadays I don''t think there is anything more chic than the idea of black jewelry where the diamonds and the white gold absolutely pop and these marvelous pearls that he suspended have motion...The firm closed its doors in 2001." Barry Weber on the Antiques Road Show.

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Marsh Mid-20th Century Steel and Pearl Dress Set

French Art Nouveau Games Table by Gallé

A French Art Nouveau games table by Emile Gallé, featuring inlaid fruitwood marquetry depicting thistles and card suit symbols. A similar table is pictured in: "Gallé Furniture" by Alastair Duncan and Georges de Bartha, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 2012, p. 130, plate 1.

French Art Nouveau Games Table by Gallé

French Art Nouveau Wooden "Ombelle" Table by Emile Gallé

A French Art Nouveau "Ombelle" carved walnut table, by Emile Gallé. The table is decorated with fruitwood marquetry featuring a butterfly alighting on an ombelle blossom and has three carved feet. A similar table is pictured in: "Gallé Furniture" by Alastair Duncan and Georges de Bartha, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 2012, p. 202, plate 182.

French Art Nouveau Wooden 'Ombelle' Table by Emile Gallé

French Art Nouveau Games Table by Gallé

A French Art Nouveau games table in cedar and walnut by Emile Gallé, featuring inlaid marquetry when closed and open. When closed, the marquetry decoration is of tree branches with buds and flowers and can serve as an end table. Opened, the motif is more foliate. A similar table is pictured in: "Gallé Furniture" by Alastair Duncan and Georges de Bartha, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 2012, p. 134, plates 8 and 8a.

French Art Nouveau Games Table by Gallé

Marcus & Co. Art Nouveau Pearl, Diamond and Emerald Brooch

An Art Nouveau brooch with pearls, diamonds and emerald by Marcus & Co. The brooch has 10 semi-spherical pearls, 15 Old European-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of 1.25 carats and a polished emerald drop. Gemological Institute of America certificate #2171449596 states the pearls are natural saltwater button pearls. The multi-generational New York firm of Marcus & Co was founded by an ambitious young German immigrant who had trained at a prominent Dresden court jeweler. In 1892, after working with Charles Lewis Tiffany, Hermann Marcus and his sons William and George together set up a business that soon became a glittering New York society institution renowned not only for its superb diamonds, colored stones and pearls, but also its instantly recognizable, original design style. The firm produced great jewels in the Art Nouveau and Arts & Crafts sensibility, with George, the artist/designer, drawing inspiration from sources as diverse and exotic as the contemporary French masters, the Moghuls and Maharajahs, the garland style of the Ancien Regime, and the genius of Renaissance goldsmiths. George''s distinctive, confident hand was always discernible in Marcus creations. Working as a team with George, his brother William was a gem and pearl connoisseur who travelled the world hunting fine gem material, including purchasing the entire production of never-before-se ... en black opal in Lightning Ridge Australia in 1908. Marcus exhibited at the 1900 Exposition Universelle in Paris, and their work won prizes at the prestigious Society of Arts & Crafts of Boston. Plique-a-jour enamel was an art in which Marcus & Co. excelled, creating jewels with unprecedented three-dimensional depth in this medium. The firm and family were well-known for their charitable activities and promotion of young jewelers such as Raymond Yard.

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Marcus & Co. Art Nouveau Pearl, Diamond and Emerald Brooch

Marcus & Co. Art Nouveau White Opal and Chrysoprase, Plique-à-Jour Enamel and Gold Pendant Brooch

An American Art Nouveau 18 karat gold and enamel pendant brooch with opals and chrysoprase by Marcus & Co.. The pendant brooch has 6 cabochon white opals, 63 cabochon chrysoprase stones and plique-à-jour enamel. Suspended from the brooch is an opal and chrysoprase pendant drop. Detachable brooch finding and flip-down bail. The multi-generational New York firm of Marcus & Co was founded by an ambitious young German immigrant who had trained at a prominent Dresden court jeweler. In 1892, after working with Charles Lewis Tiffany, Hermann Marcus and his sons William and George together set up a business that soon became a glittering New York society institution renowned not only for its superb diamonds, colored stones and pearls, but also its instantly recognizable, original design style. The firm produced great jewels in the Art Nouveau and Arts & Crafts sensibility, with George, the artist/designer, drawing inspiration from sources as diverse and exotic as the contemporary French masters, the Moghuls and Maharajahs, the garland style of the Ancien Regime, and the genius of Renaissance goldsmiths. George''s distinctive, confident hand was always discernible in Marcus creations. Working as a team with George, his brother William was a gem and pearl connoisseur who travelled the world hunting fine gem material, including purchasing the entire production of never-before-seen black ... opal in Lightning Ridge Australia in 1908. Marcus exhibited at the 1900 Exposition Universelle in Paris, and their work won prizes at the prestigious Society of Arts & Crafts of Boston. Plique-a-jour enamel was an art in which Marcus & Co. excelled, creating jewels with unprecedented three-dimensional depth in this medium. The firm and family were well-known for their charitable activities and promotion of young jewelers such as Raymond Yard. Shown in the Poster House (New York) exhibition "Alphonse Mucha: Art Nouveau./Nouvelle Femme," June 20-October 6, 2019.

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Marcus & Co. Art Nouveau White Opal and Chrysoprase, Plique-à-Jour Enamel and Gold Pendant Brooch

French ''Bleeding Heart'', Enameled Cameo Glass Vase

A French cameo glass "Coeur de Jeanette" vase by Muller Freres. Muller Frères displays an incredible intellectual unity between this vase''s design and it''s literary title. The "Coeur de Jeanette" was an Alsatian colloquialism for the Bleeding Heart flower. Referring to a jewelry form comprised of a Latin cross suspended from a bleeding heart, newly working young girls across Northern France would use four months of pay to make their first autonomous purchase. Crucially the purchase was made on the titular Fête de la Saint-Jean. The "Coeur de Jeannette" represented a rite of passage for young Alsatian girls, and one that is perfectly expressed by this vase''s crepuscular setting. Just as twilight denotes the border between day and night, the Fête de la Saint-Jean marked the border between girlhood and womanhood. The "Coeur de Jeanette" is an inverted baluster shaped vase that has been blown, cased, cameo-cut, wheel engraved, and enameled. The vase has a lipless rim and a splayed firing foot. A shell of opalescent glass was blown onto a core of non-lead colorless glass. The opalescent glass gives the interior a captivating rainbow iridescence that is brought out under reflected light. The gather was subsequently marvered and cased in a layer of silver nitrate amber glass, an intercalaire layer of translucent white glass and finished with a layer of translucent aubergine gl ... ass. The intercalaire layer has a spatter of powdered glass inclusions that radiates from the base to the rim. The powdered glass inclusions come in two colors: translucent fuschia pink and opaque periwinkle. The opaque periwinkle serves as a reprise to the milky color of the vase''s opalescent glass interior. The translucent aubergine glass was deeply carved, giving the veins and leaf margins the highest relief. This technique perfectly captures the transmitted light that affects leaves with frontal views and upward-facing planes. Miniscule bubbles were created on the surface of the translucent white layer by sprinkling bistre colored glass inclusions on the surface while the gather was still in a semi-molten state. In the process of blowing the vase, the base was subtly twisted clockwise from the foot, giving the viewer a sensation of rising air. Two racemes of foreground blooms were enameled in two layers. For the normal cultivars, the fuschia pink of the powdered inclusions are reprised as a layer atop the cream colored enamel, applied thickly or thinly depending on the petal''s venation, with a brush and needle. For the white "Alba" cultivar, a variation on the "grisaille" technique was used. The shadows of the petal were modeled by exposing the aubergine glass underneath. A layer of translucent "jaune d''antimoine" (antimony yellow) enamel was applied, reflecting the light of the amber colored sky. Latent in the piece is the repeated graduation of pictorial motifs, namely the graduation of the magnitude of blooms on each flower raceme, the illusion of depth created by racemes of different sizes and the graduation of the edges of the leaves towards the base and foot. The softness of the edges serve to mimic human vision in crepuscular settings. Masses become unified in tone while backlit individual objects still retain some sharpness as they silhouette against the flaxen twilight. References: Kelly, Barbara L. 2008. French music, culture, and national identity: 1870-1939. Rochester: University of Rochester Press. Baudoin, Marcel & Lacoulomere, Georges., Le Coeur Vendéen, Société d''Anthropologie de Paris, 1903

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French ''Bleeding Heart'', Enameled Cameo Glass Vase

Georges Fouquet French Art Nouveau Opal, Pearl, Gold and Plique-à-Jour Enamel Pendant Necklace

A French Art Nouveau gold and plique-à-jour enamel pendant with opals, freshwater and natural pearls by Georges Fouquet. The pendant has 11 opals, 13 freshwater pearls and one natural saltwater pearl. The pendant is designed in a flowing foliate motif with plique-à-jour enamel leaves floating over translucent opals and decorated with clusters of pearls. With signed G. Fouquet box. Shown in the Poster House (New York) exhibition "Alphonse Mucha: Art Nouveau./Nouvelle Femme," June 20-October 6, 2019.

Georges Fouquet French Art Nouveau Opal, Pearl, Gold and Plique-à-Jour Enamel Pendant Necklace

Marsh Mid-20th Century Patinated Steel, Palladium, Pearl and Diamond Ring

An American patinated steel, palladium, mabé pearl and diamond ring, by G.T. Marsh. The ring centers on a 15.4mm Mabé pearl flanked by 6 round brilliant-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of .30 carat, mounted in patinated steel, completed by a palladium shank. G.T. Marsh & Co. was a San Francisco-based Asian art dealer known for their distinctive jewels. As a boy infatuated with Asian culture, George Turner Marsh apprenticed with a Japanese tea merchant, remaining there alone while his Australian family continued on to San Francisco, where they settled. Young George used his time in Yokohama to become conversant in Japanese art and aesthetics, and after re-joining his family, established an Asian art gallery using the expertise he had acquired. During the 1930s, 40s and 50s, his family began designing jewelry based on their interpretation of masterful Japanese metalwork together with the favored gems of the region, jadeite, coral and pearls. The firm''s unique steel jewelry was produced by bluing and sandblasting techniques, which gave the metal its matte finish, an extraordinary base for its sparkling, gleaming gems.

Marsh Mid-20th Century Patinated Steel, Palladium, Pearl and Diamond Ring

"Tale of Genji" Commode by Émile Gallé

A French Art Nouveau marquetry commode by Émile Gallé. With original key. The syncretic influence of Japanese art is keenly felt in Gallé''s commode. The beginning of Galle''s fascination with Japanese art can be traced back to his friendship with Hokkai Takashima (1850-1931), a fellow botanist and member of the École de Nancy. Their botanical dialogue was facilitated by the Shokobutsu mei-i, a book of Japanese names for botanical species. It is from Hokkai that Gallé gained a spiritual and symbolic understanding of nature. Along with other École de Nancy artists, Hokkai and Gallé exhibited together in the display window of René Wiener''s papeterie. The store served as the office of Wiener''s arts journal, the Nancy artiste, which regularly featured on its covers contemporary examples of Gansai (Japanese watercolor), Byobu (folding screens) from the Rinpa school, Sumi-e (ink painting), and Ukiyo-e (woodblock prints). As a show of gratitude, Hokkai bequeathed a vast art book collection to Wiener. It is from this record that we know with certainty of which Japanese artists Gallé had knowledge. One of the books in Hokkai''s collection was Hokusai''s Les cent paysages du Fuji (Fugaku hyakkei.) This 1835 expansion of Hokusai''s 36 views of Mount Fuji contained more elaborate iterations of his original compositions. The commode features two drawers and four cabriole legs. ... The front of the drawers features a marquetry panel with mountains, unkai (sea of clouds) and usugumo (wisps of clouds) motifs. It is likely from works like Hokusai''s Yama mata yama (Mountains Upon Mountains) that Gallé assimilated the unkai (??) motif. The Yama mata yama is the album''s only zenithal view, allowing this phenomenon which is normally only visible from high elevations. On the top of the commode, a sunset mirage overlooks the entire scene. Meanwhile in the foreground, Gallé has included a usugumo motif rendered in warm brown wood. The wisps of cloud motif originates in a stanza in the Tale of Genji in his mourning for Fujitsubo. Those thin wisps of cloud trailing there over Mountains caught in sunset light Seem to wish to match their hue To the sleeves of the bereaved. There is a distinct temporal quality in the commode''s composition. The left side panel depicts a diurne while the right side panel depicts a nocturne. The juxtaposition of day and night in Japanese ukiyo-e was a subject much beloved by Hokusai and Hiroshige and was termed chuya (chu meaning day and ya meaning night). The Japanese nocturne was clearly a subject of great fascination to Gallé as well as evidenced by his "Nuit Japonais" vase. A similar commode is pictured in: Gallé Furniture, by Alastair Duncan and Georges de Bartha, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 2012, p. 329, plate 15.

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'Tale of Genji' Commode by Émile Gallé

French Art Nouveau Dragonfly Table by Émile Gallé.

A French Art Nouveau two tiered table by Émile Gallé. The table''s four legs are the carved bodies of dragonflies, their wings outstretched and frozen mid-flight. The table top rests on the dragonflies'' heads and wings, with a fluid curvature in the corners creating a crown for the winged creatures'' heads. Marquetry on the table top depicts flowers on long leafed stems, with shadows of foliage in the background. Decoration in darker tones and larger, starker motifs, decorate the lower tier, playing on the shadows in which it is naturally shrouded. The dragonfly works of Galle''s provoked very strong critical reaction when they were debuted in 1900, with champions of Art Nouveau lauding the modernity of the dragonfly as caryatid, while detractors were horrified by the very idea of insects as table legs. Time has certainly found favor with this design, as it has found pride of place in museum collections worldwide. A similar table is pictured in: Gallé Furniture, by Alastair Duncan and Georges de Bartha, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 2012, p. 207, plate 192a.

French Art Nouveau Dragonfly Table by Émile Gallé.

French Art Nouveau Vitrine by Emile Gallé

A French Art Nouveau vitrine by Emile Gallé, featuring marquetry and carving throughout with original stylized fleur-de-lys brass shelf rests and keys with floral decoration. This unusual piece was originally electrified when manufactured. A similar vitrine is pictured in: Gallé Furniture, by Alastair Duncan and Georges de Bartha, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 2012, p. 295, plate 17.

French Art Nouveau Vitrine by Emile Gallé

A French Art Nouveau Wooden Pedestal by Emile Gallé

A French Art Nouveau two-tiered square pedestal with carved and marquetry decoration by Emile Gallé. The pedestal has two marquetry shelves depicting leaves. Its four sinuous legs are enhanced with carved arch supports. A similar selette is pictured in: Gallé Furniture, by Alastair Duncan and Georges de Bartha, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 2012, p. 253, plate 18.

A French Art Nouveau Wooden Pedestal by Emile Gallé

Georges Fouquet French Art Nouveau Opal and Silver Peacock Cloak Clasp

A French Art Nouveau silver cloak clasp with opals by Georges Fouquet. The cape clasp is decorated with 14 bezel-set crystal opal plaques. The clasp is designed as two intertwined peacocks with extravagant whiplash ''feathers''. Inspired by a noted collaboration with the renowned Art Nouveau innovator Alfonse Mucha, this cloak clasp in all its exquisite detail and voluptuous lines perfectly encapsulates the spirit of the period. Its peacock theme was a favorite motif of Fouquet and Mucha. A similar piece is pictured in Alastair Duncan''s, The Paris Salons, 1895-1914: Volume I, Antique Collectors'' Club, Woodbridge, Suffolk, 1994, page 251.

Georges Fouquet French Art Nouveau Opal and Silver Peacock Cloak Clasp

French Art Nouveau Vitrine by Emile Gallé

A French carved and fruitwood marquetry inlaid Ombelliféres vitrine by Emile Gallé. The vitrine has marquetry ombelle flowers in its interior and on the panel below the bottom shelf. The interior has two small carved half shelves. The top and bottom have elaborately carved ombelle decorations. It sits on four sinuously carved feet. Literature: Alastair Duncan and Georges de Bartha, Galle Furniture, Woodbridge, Antique Collector''s Club, 2012, p. 307, pl.42, for a similar example.

French Art Nouveau Vitrine by Emile Gallé

English Victorian silver-plated suite by Elkington & Co.

A suite of three English Victorian silver-plated objects by Elkington & Co. The suite comprises a pair of four-light candelabra and an epergne. Each candelabra is decorated with three sphinxes that sit atop a splayed paw footed platform. The stem and arms are adorned with a classic foliage decoration. The epergne is ornately decorated and accented with enamel work surrounding the "Three Graces"; daughters of Zeus who were said to represent youth, beauty, mirth and elegance. The graces presided over banquets and gatherings, to delight the guests of the gods. Elkington & Co. was founded by George Richards Elkington and his brother Henry Elkington in the 1830''s. The company over the years was very successful and known to be a prime producer of silver-plated objects. Elkington received various royal warrants of appointments including an appointment from the emperor of Austria.

English Victorian silver-plated suite by Elkington & Co.

Marcus & Company Art Nouveau Blue Sapphire, Old European Diamond, Gold and Enamel Ring

An American Art Nouveau 18 karat gold, enamel, sapphire and diamond ring by Marcus & Co. The ring has a cushion-cut blue sapphire with an approximate weight of 8.65 carats, and 27 old European-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of .32 carat. The blue sapphire is most likely of Ceylon origin with no heat treatment evident. The center stone is held in place with gold tendrils that flow throughout the ring in extravagant Art Nouveau motifs. The multi-generational New York firm of Marcus & Co was founded by an ambitious young German immigrant who had trained at a prominent Dresden court jeweler. In 1892, after working with Charles Lewis Tiffany, Hermann Marcus and his sons William and George together set up a business that soon became a glittering New York society institution renowned not only for its superb diamonds, colored stones and pearls, but also its instantly recognizable, original design style. The firm produced great jewels in the Art Nouveau and Arts & Crafts sensibility, with George, the artist/designer, drawing inspiration from sources as diverse and exotic as the contemporary French masters, the Moghuls and Maharajahs, the garland style of the Ancien Regime, and the genius of Renaissance goldsmiths. George''s distinctive, confident hand was always discernible in Marcus creations. Working as a team with George, his brother William was a gem and pearl conn ... oisseur who travelled the world hunting fine gem material, including purchasing the entire production of never-before-seen black opal in Lightning Ridge Australia in 1908. Marcus exhibited at the 1900 Exposition Universelle in Paris, and their work won prizes at the prestigious Society of Arts & Crafts of Boston. Plique-a-jour enamel was an art in which Marcus & Co. excelled, creating jewels with unprecedented three-dimensional depth in this medium. The firm and family were well-known for their charitable activities and promotion of young jewelers such as Raymond Yard.

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Marcus & Company Art Nouveau Blue Sapphire, Old European Diamond, Gold and Enamel Ring

French Art Nouveau ''Fleurs de Pommier'' Cameo Glass Vase by Émile Gallé.

A French Art Nouveau ''Fleurs de pommier'' cameo glass vase by Émile Gallé. This ovular vase features crimson leaves and crisp red blossoms on a gold ground. The flora is rendered in slightly translucent glass, which makes a remarkable contrast against the opaque ground. Gallé had a remarkable ability to convey feeling and time in his work. With a stagnant sky and vividly warm color, this vase has the essence of a summer sunset. A similar vase is pictured in: Glass by Gallé, by Alastair Duncan and Georges de Bartha, New York: Harry N. Abrams, Inc., 1984, p. 195, plate 295.

French Art Nouveau ''Fleurs de Pommier'' Cameo Glass Vase by Émile Gallé.

"Fruit Branch" Vase by Emile Gallé

A French Art Nouveau mold blown cameo glass "Plum" vase by Emile Gallé. The applied blue and yellowish burgundy fruits rest on brown leaves, all on a yellow ground. A similar vase is pictured in: "Glass by Gallé", by Alastair Duncan and Georges de Bartha, New York: Harry N. Abrams, Inc., 1984, p. 196, plate 298.

'Fruit Branch' Vase by Emile Gallé

Cartier Paris Mid-20th Century Diamond, Sapphire and Platinum ''Panthère'' Brooch

A French Mid-20th Century platinum brooch with diamonds, sapphires, and emeralds by Cartier Paris. The brooch has pavé round-cut diamonds with an approximate total weight of 4.30 carats, a cabochon sapphire with an approximate weight of 4.70 carats, 44 cabochon sapphires with an approximate total weight of .88 carat, and 2 cabochon emerald eyes. Signed Cartier box. "In 1914 Louis Cartier commissioned French painter George Barbier to draw a lady with jewels and a panther. The artwork was later used in advertising, and Cartier was inextricably linked with the symbol of this animal. Louis Cartier was the pioneer in taming the legendary creature and his associate Jeanne Toussaint went on to make magnificent use of the icon. The panther has since inspired timeless and elegant collections of jewelry and timepieces that show the multiple facets of the animal that can be at times bold, regal or sensual." -- Amazing Cartier, by Nadine Coleno, Flammarion, 2008, p. 72

Cartier Paris Mid-20th Century Diamond, Sapphire and Platinum ''Panthère'' Brooch

French Art Nouveau Gilt Bronze Desk Weight by Georges Recipon

A French Art Nouveau gilt and patinated bronze figural sculpture, titled "Porte-bonheure a la muse ou La chance," by Georges Récipon (1860-1920). The desk weight is modeled as a female nude hammering nails into a horseshoe. Ancient tradition held that iron held or stored luck, and so the iron nails in horseshoes are actually what were originally understood to be the source of their luck. This charming figure in Recipon''s work is hammering more nails into a large horseshoe, thereby increasing its luckiness. A similar sculpture is picutred in: Susse Frères: 150 Years of sculpture, 1837-1987, by Pierre Cadet, Paris: Susse Frères, 1992, p. 66, fig. 110.

French Art Nouveau Gilt Bronze Desk Weight by Georges Recipon

Trabert & Hoeffer Mauboussin Art Deco Yellow Diamond, Emerald and Platinum Ring

An American Art Moderne diamond, emerald and platinum twinstone ring by Trabert & Hoeffer-Mauboussin. The stepped, high-arched mount set with a yellow cushion-cut diamond weighing approximately 1.75 carats, and an emerald-cut emerald weighing approximately1.65 carats, completed by stepped shoulders and shank of conforming design. Formed in 1935, Trabert Hoeffer-Mauboussin was a merger between Mauboussin Paris'' Park Avenue branch and an innovative American firm, Trabert & Hoeffer, a Manhattan partnership whose stylish owners had Hollywood connections and a tendency to splurge on world-famous gems for display. Howard Hoeffer, a proponent of French jewelry design who sent his artisans to Paris for training, had cultivated Georges Mauboussin from the early 1920''s, even before the French firm won a Grand Prize at the Grand Central Palace Exhibition in 1924. By the mid 1930s, the Depression had brought both firms to the brink of bankruptcy, struggling with large inventories of superb jewelry and gems of historic provenance. From 1935 to 1940, the firms collaborated to produce and loan high style jewels and large gems to the Hollywood studios. The period''s iconic photo portraits of Marlene Dietrich and Claudette Colbert, among others, show these eternal stars adorned in the firm''s stunning Art Moderne masterpieces. A product of that early collaboration, this twin stone pla ... tinum ring, with its classic pairing of emerald and yellow diamond, is a mini-masterpiece of Machine Age design and construction. Dense, streamlined, and perfectly balanced, it is a chic statement of French-American style.

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Trabert & Hoeffer Mauboussin Art Deco Yellow Diamond, Emerald and Platinum Ring

A French Art Nouveau Wooden Pedestal by Emile Gallé

A French Art Nouveau selette by Émile Gallé. Gallé made very few selettes of this quality and design during his career, and even fewer of those with curved lower pieces that reunite in the middle, culminating in a gorgeous flower in full bloom. This model is very similar to the famous version with banana leaves, called Bananie. The marquetry on the top and middle sections of the selette, depicting flowers and leaves, is extremely bright and detailed. The variations of color emphasize the differences between the brighter lilies of the valley and the darker background. The curves and flowing details of the wood carving surrounding the top shelf come to challenge the stricter straight lines used for the contour of the piece. The balance between curves and straight line work in perfect harmony and together underline the subject matter. A similar selette is pictured in: Gallé Furniture, by Alastair Duncan and Georges de Bartha, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 2012, p. 245, plates 4 & 4a.

A French Art Nouveau Wooden Pedestal by Emile Gallé

Art Nouveau Hair Comb featuring Carved Horn by Elizabeth Bonté.

A French Art Nouveau hair comb with carved horn by Elizabeth Bonté. The hair comb features two cicadas in carved horn amidst foliage. The comb has five teeth. Elizabeth Bonté was an Art Nouveau designer educated at the Ecole des Arts Décoratifs in Paris, and an acknowledged master of unusual and beautiful organic materials in jewels. She was an early proponent of the use of horn, a light and pliable but extraordinarily difficult material that, once mastered, could be tinted, molded and given a skin-like patina. Here the horn has been carved, shaped and colored to represent a pair of cicadas perched among fruiting olive branches and leaves. For years, Bonté''s main rival was a man, Georges Pierre, who ultimately joined her studio. They combined forces, collaborating until 1936.

Art Nouveau Hair Comb featuring Carved Horn by Elizabeth Bonté.

Mauboussin Art Deco Turquoise, Chalcedony, Diamond and Rock Crystal Necklace

An Art Deco platinum necklace with turquoise, rock crystal, chalcedony and diamonds by Mauboussin. There are 72 round-cut diamonds that have the approximate total weight of 5.96 carats. The house of Mauboussin was considered the leader in design innovation and luxury creation in the Art Deco period, so much so that Maurice Dauzalle, the famed art critic, wrote of the firm''s 1930 exhibition in "L''Illustration:" ''All the creations on display radiate the same artistic brilliance, the influence of a strong personality, a decisiveness.... In all of [Georges Mauboussin]''s work there is a lively intelligence, a driving inspiration....'' This striking collar features a strong, solidly Deco design that, unusually, centers on the cool interplay of color provided by the evenly-matched turquoise and the deeply black onyx. Interspersed with sleek slivers of architecturally-striated rock crystal and diamond-studded platinum accents, this industrially elegant piece demonstrates the height of design from the well-celebrated house of Mauboussin. With certificate of authenticity from Mauboussin.

Mauboussin Art Deco Turquoise, Chalcedony, Diamond and Rock Crystal Necklace

Tiffany Studios New York Bronze and Abalone Pen Wipe

A Tiffany Studios New York gilt bronze and abalone pen wipe. For the desk set: pieces in the "Abalone" pattern are pictured in: Tiffany Desk Sets, by William R. Holland, Atglen, PA: Schiffer, 2008, pp. 107-114. Various pieces are also picutred in: Tiffany Desk Treasures: A Collector''s Guide, by George A. Kemeny and Donald Miller, New York: Hudson Hills Press, 2002, p. 50; and in: Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models, by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988, pp. 470-472.

Tiffany Studios New York Bronze and Abalone Pen Wipe

Tiffany Studios New York Bronze and Abalone Inkwell

A Tiffany Studios New York gilt bronze and abalone inkwell. For the desk set: pieces in the "Abalone" pattern are pictured in: Tiffany Desk Sets, by William R. Holland, Atglen, PA: Schiffer, 2008, pp. 107-114. Various pieces are also picutred in: Tiffany Desk Treasures: A Collector''s Guide, by George A. Kemeny and Donald Miller, New York: Hudson Hills Press, 2002, p. 50; and in: Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models, by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988, pp. 470-472.

Tiffany Studios New York Bronze and Abalone Inkwell

Tiffany Studios New York Bronze and Abalone Rocker Blotter

A Tiffany Studios New York gilt bronze and abalone rocker blotter. For the desk set: pieces in the "Abalone" pattern are pictured in: Tiffany Desk Sets, by William R. Holland, Atglen, PA: Schiffer, 2008, pp. 107-114. Various pieces are also picutred in: Tiffany Desk Treasures: A Collector''s Guide, by George A. Kemeny and Donald Miller, New York: Hudson Hills Press, 2002, p. 50; and in: Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models, by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988, pp. 470-472.

Tiffany Studios New York Bronze and Abalone Rocker Blotter

Tiffany Studios New York Bronze and Abalone Stamp Box

A Tiffany Studios New York gilt bronze and abalone covered stamp box. For the desk set: pieces in the "Abalone" pattern are pictured in: Tiffany Desk Sets, by William R. Holland, Atglen, PA: Schiffer, 2008, pp. 107-114. Various pieces are also picutred in: Tiffany Desk Treasures: A Collector''s Guide, by George A. Kemeny and Donald Miller, New York: Hudson Hills Press, 2002, p. 50; and in: Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models, by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988, pp. 470-472.

Tiffany Studios New York Bronze and Abalone  Stamp Box

Tiffany Studios New York Bronze and Abalone three-part Tray

A Tiffany Studios New York gilt bronze and abalone three-part tray. For the desk set: pieces in the "Abalone" pattern are pictured in: Tiffany Desk Sets, by William R. Holland, Atglen, PA: Schiffer, 2008, pp. 107-114. Various pieces are also picutred in: Tiffany Desk Treasures: A Collector''s Guide, by George A. Kemeny and Donald Miller, New York: Hudson Hills Press, 2002, p. 50; and in: Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models, by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988, pp. 470-472.

Tiffany Studios New York Bronze and Abalone three-part Tray