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"snake bracelet"

Victorian Gold Snake Bangle with Diamond, Sapphire and Ruby

An English Victorian 18 karat gold hinged snake bangle with diamond, sapphire and ruby. The head is a cabochon blue sapphire that has the approximate weight of .15 carat surrounded by .12 carat of rose-cut diamonds with 2 cabochon ruby eyes that have the approximate total weight of .04 carat. After Prince Albert gave Queen Victoria a snake band with an emerald head as a wedding present in 1839, snakes, particularly in a fully realized or continuous band form, came to be a symbol for eternal love and devotion to the Victorians. This bracelet, which could alternatively be worn as an arm band, depending on the preference and comfort of the wearer, is a particularly charming example of Victorian snake jewelry. Unusually, the serpent''s tail fully encircles the bangle several times as the two ends of the bangle meet, adding fantastically to its visual width. The diamond-haloed sapphire crowning the piece adds a beautiful bit of color and brilliance, as do the ruby eyes.

Victorian Gold Snake Bangle with Diamond, Sapphire and Ruby

Victorian Diamond and Turquoise Snake Bangle Bracelet

A Victorian 15 karat gold bracelet with turquoise and diamonds. This is a large bangle, to be worn either on the wrist or as an arm band, It has the form of a serpent dynamically wrapped upon itself and seemingly caught in motion, covered in tightly-set cabochons of turquoise and replete with striated gold on the reverse side to complete the appearance of a snake. The head of the reptile features a large tear drop-shaped cabochon of turquoise framed by twelve old mine-cut diamonds that have approximate total weight of 1.14 carats, and has a lovely pair of diamond eyes. Turquoise was mistakenly named as such during the Victorian times because it was believed by most Western Europeans that the blue stone came from Turkey, when in fact it merely passed through Turkey on its way westward from Iran. Because of its color, turquoise was associated by Britons in the Victorian Age with the Forget Me Not flower, which, in the very sophisticated and well known "language of flowers," was a symbol of undying love. The snake, when depicted in a continuous loop, was also understood during this period as a potent emblem for eternal affection, largely due to the fact that Prince Albert presented Queen Victoria with a snake band with a gemstone head as a wedding ring.

Victorian Diamond and Turquoise Snake Bangle Bracelet