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"Nasturtium" Tiffany Floor Lamp

A Tiffany Studios New York "Nasturtium" glass and bronze table lamp. The shade, depicting red, orange and pink blossoms on a variegated translucent green ground, sits atop a Tiffany Studios New York patinated bronze "Junior Onion Decorated" floor lamp base. A similar shade is pictured in: The Lamps of Tiffany, by Dr. Egon Neustadt, New York: The Fairfield Press, 1970, p. 155, plate 218. A similar base is pictured in: Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models, by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988, p. 206, plate 801.

'Nasturtium' Tiffany Floor Lamp

"Peony" Border Tiffany Floor Lamp

Tiffany Studios border "Peony" floor lamp with peony blossoms ranging in color from pink to pink/red to pink/purple, surrounded by leaves in various shades of green. The background culminates at the top of the shade with rows of multihued red/blue/cyan glass. The shade is further accented by two rectangular bottom border rows. The upper one is of mottled amber/green glass, and the bottom one is of rippled green glass. The shade sits atop a patinated bronze decorated senior floor base. A similar shade is pictured in: The Lamps of Tiffany, by Dr. Egon Neustadt, New York: The Fairfield Press, 1970, p. 29, cat. no. 111; and in: Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models, by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988, p. 204, plate 786. A similar base is pictured in: Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models, by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988, p. 200, plate 777.

'Peony' Border Tiffany Floor Lamp

Tiffany Studios New York Favrile Glass and Bronze "Harp" Floor Lamp

A Tiffany Studios New York "Harp" floor lamp with patinated bronze base and green blown-glass "Damascene" shade. This "Damascene" floor lamp is of a lead composition with a transparent green, "dychroide" glass and iridized glass combed decoration. Of particular note is the complexity of the iridization on the lamp that uses two distinct metallic oxides applied in two different techniques. Initially, a shell of transparent green glass was blown onto a core of opaque white glass core, forming the lamp''s white interior and thin transparent green exterior. Subsequently, "Dychroide" glass was carefully trailed twenty-nine times around the form. This particular variety of "Dychroide" glass, an innovation by Arthur J. Nash, production manager at the Tiffany Furnaces, has the unique quality of appearing green in reflected light and amber in transmitted light. This innovation gives a dynamic quality to Tiffany''s lamps that proved to be a true unification of form and function. When lit, the amber of the "Dychroide" glass causes the green to perceptually vibrate, further amplifying the effect of radiation in the lamp. The network of threads was subsequently marvered into the glass and evenly iridized with gold metallic oxides in the top half of the lamp and platinum metallic oxides in the bottom half of the lamp. Gold metal oxides that transition into strokes of platinum metallic ... oxides were then painted obliquely around the form. The piece was then blown and tooled into a dome shape. Evidence that the glass was first iridized then blown can be found in the subtle craquelure of the iridescence towards the base of the lamp. The double iridization creates a high luster and an added depth to the piece. A comb with twenty-nine teeth (equivalent to the number of "Dychroide" glass trails) was evenly raked through the semi-molten glass. The combing was purposefully offset from the trails so that they could still be seen in the final wave pattern. The green trails without "Dychroide" threads transmit the most light, creating a vivid amber starburst pattern when lit. The lamp shade is surmounted by a cast bronze aperture ring with three ball screws, liliform heat cap, terminating in a ball-shaped finial. The ventilation holes in the heat cap are subtly concealed by the five petals of the flower. The heat cap holds a light bulb and pull chain that terminates in an acorn pendant. The heat cap is supported on both sides by a harp with two component parts, a double ogee shoulder, and a single ogee base. The two parts of the harp are held together with a pin that allow the user to change the position of the light if they so wish. This mechanism is fitted with rosette motif side knobs that beautifully complement the liliform socket holder. The base of the harp splays into petals, connecting to the globular molding of a five-foot stem which swells, tapers, reswells, straightens, then reswells at the base. The stem is supported by five dartform feet. The cast bronze stem, harp, and base all have acid etched finishes giving them a red-speckled green patina. A similar base and shade are pictured separately in: Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models, by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988. Shade: p. 211, plate 827; base: p. 210, plate 821.

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Tiffany Studios New York Favrile Glass and Bronze 'Harp' Floor Lamp

Tiffany "Maple Leaf" Floor Lamp

A Tiffany Studios New York "Maple Leaf" leaded glass and bronze Floor Lamp. The shade sits atop a Tiffany Studios New York patinated bronze "Decorated Junior" floor lamp base with Onion Bulb design. The Glass Selector at Tiffany Studios chose "mottled" glass in hues of green, blue and orange to depict the leaves of a Sugar Maple tree in dappled sunlight. The shade has a powder blue background meant to evoke the sky. Maples must be about 30 years old before they start seeding, so Tiffany chose to represent a mature tree in autumn, with three rows of green and orange samaras dropping through the sky to the ground, ensuring the species'' survival to the next generation. This rare and unusual "Maple Leaf" design was one of the last created at the Tiffany Studios, debuting in the 1915 Price Catalog. A similar shade and base are pictured separately in: Tiffany Lamps and Metalware: An illustrated reference to over 2000 models, by Alastair Duncan, Woodbridge: Suffolk: Antique Collectors'' Club, 1988. Shade: p. 196, plates 768-769. Base: p. 206, plates 801-802.

Tiffany 'Maple Leaf' Floor Lamp

Tiffany Studios New York "Geometric Tile" Chandelier

A rare Tiffany Studios New York "Woven Basket" glass and bronze chandelier designed for the Farwell Building in Detroit, Michigan. Tiffany was an avid collector and admirer of Native American woven baskets; he admired their studied, refined application of color and rhythmic geometry, as well as the intensive focus on hand made craft they represented. In this stunning chandelier, we see Tiffany reflect those aspects of the woven baskets he so admired while incorporating a special, exciting color palette to reflect the custom interior space the light fixture would hang in. The present example is one of three similar chandeliers designed by Tiffany Studios for the entrance hall of the Farwell Building in Detroit, Michigan. The building was designed by the Detroit architectural firm of Rogers & Bonnah and opened on March 8, 1915. Tiffany Studios was commissioned to design the bronze work around the main entrance door, as well as the mosaic vaulted ceiling and three chandeliers adorning the entrance hall. A photograph taken by the Detroit Free Press on February 12, 1974 shows the three chandeliers and the impressive mosaic ceiling in the entrance hall. The elaborate geometric pattern of glass in this chandelier echoes the iridescent glass mosaic pattern in the vaulted ceiling from which the chandelier was suspended. The same pattern and color scheme is reflected in the mosaic ... floor designed by Tiffany Studios for the Philadelphia Mint, which opened in 1901. PROVENANCE: Harry Rott, former owner of the Farwell Building, Detroit, MI Sotheby''s Important Design Sale 08 June 2005, Lot 176 {$168,000} Pictured in Vivienne Couldrey, The Art of Louis Comfort Tiffany, London, 2001, p. 163 and back cover (for a section of mosaic glass designed by Tiffany Studios for the Philadelphia Mint)

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Tiffany Studios New York 'Geometric Tile' Chandelier

"Laburnum" Tiffany Floor Lamp

A Tiffany Studios New York "Laburnum" floor lamp. The shade features an upper portion of branches and foliage and cascading flower clusters, ending in an irregular border. The irregular undulating patterned border of the shade, comprised of three long flower clusters each surrounded by three smaller clusters, is one of its distinguishing characteristics. This exquisitely colored shade is decorated with olive green leaves and spotted lemon yellow, oriental yellow, light green and mauve flowers suspended from brown branches. The flowers are set against a brilliant bleu de roi background. Its unique design is attributed to Clara Driscoll, the head of the Tiffany Studios Women''s Glass Cutting Department. Although it is easy to celebrate the exciting particularities of each of Louis Comfort Tiffany''s lamps, there is a true uniqueness to the "Laburnum" that should not be overlooked. This lamp is the only in Tiffany''s repertoire that was made with this exact shape; carefully executed to reflect the particular sumptuousness and subsequent heavy draping of the Laburnum flower. Tiffany himself was a great lover of this flower, and cultivated them at Laurelton Hall. A similar lamp is pictured in: Eidelberg, Martin, Nina Gray, Martin K. Hofer, and Clara Driscoll, 2007, "A new light on Tiffany: Clara Driscoll and the Tiffany Girls" : [On the occasion of the exhibition "A New Light ... on Tiffany", organized by the New-York-Historical Society and on view Februrary 23-May 28, 2007]. New York: New York Historical Society, p. 192, fig. 100.

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 'Laburnum' Tiffany Floor Lamp