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French Pâte-de-Verre Plaque by Cros

A French bas-relief glass pâte-de-verre plaque by Henri Cros, depicting a mythical dragon or sea creature in hues of pink, against a crystal-like ground. This is an experimental plaque by the originator of the revival of the ancient pâte-de-verre process.

French Pâte-de-Verre Plaque by Cros

Decorative Vase by Daum

A French Art Nouveau wheel-carved cameo footed glass vase by Daum. Deep purple flowers are featured against a plum and blue martelé background. Vases with similar decoration are pictured in: "Daum Frères: Maîtres Verriers", 1892-1935, by Katharina Büttiker-Weber, Zurich: Galerie Katharina Büttiker, 1986, cat. nos. 42-44.

Decorative Vase by Daum

Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase with Serpents by Ernest Leveillé

An Art Nouveau cameo glass vase by Ernest Leveillé for Escalier de Cristal, with two wheel carved red serpents in high relief intertwined around the outer surface. The background glass has a moss-like texture trapped within the vessel. The vase sits within a bronze mount at the bottom. The style of the background glass is the same as in many of his sophisticated pieces and the technique is the same as in many of his hand carved (wheel-carved) glass vases. The vase was retailed by Escalier de Cristal of Paris, one of the great proponents of Art Nouveau at the turn of the last century.

Art Nouveau Cameo Glass Vase with Serpents by Ernest Leveillé

French Art Nouveau silver and plique-à-jour enamel coupe d''ornement by Eugène Feuillâtre

A French Art Nouveau silver and plique-à-jour enamel coupe d''ornement by Eugène Feuillâtre. This exceptional compote features delicate and stylized floral patterns on the upper and lower portions. Green leaves encircle the base of the piece and the sinewy stem of the petite cup appears to grow out of the foliage below, and a spray of pink flowers blooms at the top of the compote. Feuillâtre complimented the deeply rooted organic motifs of his quintessentially Art Nouveau compote by adorning the piece with small green enamel buds on the top and bottom of the stem. This compote is particularly remarkable because it is made almost entirely of plique-à-jour enamel. Eugene Feuillâtre (1870-1916) was a sculptor, enamelist, silversmith and jeweler. He worked for Lalique at the end of the 19th century and established his own firm in 1899, specializing in plique-à-jour decorated objects. He also perfected the technique of enameling on silver and platinum. Provenance: the Collection of Joseph R. Ritman. A nearly identical coupe d''ornement resides in the Musee D''Orsay in Paris.

French Art Nouveau silver and plique-à-jour enamel coupe d''ornement by Eugène Feuillâtre

Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

A French Art Nouveau cameo glass vase by Daum, featuring a scene of red blooming flowers on an opaque white martelé ground. The flowers, which have dark centers, are suspended from dark curving stems that emerge from dark green carved leaves. Pictured in Glass, Art Nouveau to Art Deco, by Victor Arwass, page 83. Art Nouveau, the French Aesthetic,by Victor Arwas, page 506.

Cameo Glass Vase by Daum

French Art Nouveau cameo glass vase by Émile Gallé

A French Art Nouveau cameo glass vase by Émile Gallé. This large vase is decorated with wheel carved purple trumpet-creepers and vines against a green background. The flowers and vines climb up the ribbed neck of the vase. The "belle de jour" vase is a flattened baluster form vase with a everted mouth, rounded and polished rim, long slender waisted neck, short globular body, and an applied disk foot. The vase features an intercalaire layer of coarse jade frit in the top three-quarters of the vase and fine indigo frit in the bottom quarter of the vase. To construct the vase, a bubble was blown into the gather, which was cased and parison inflated into a nineteen ribbed dip mold. The stem was subsequently plucked out and twisted counterclockwise. Finally a soffieta was used to open the mouth and a pair of jacks was used to evert the rim. The vase was later cameo cut with exquisite detailing in the venation and the hirsute texture of the leaves. Galle speaks of his encounter with the belle de jour or Convolvulus mauritanicus during his visit to the Borromean islands in Lake Maggiore. As the President of the Nancy Horticultural society, Galle was received with much enthusiasm from the Maggiore horticultural community. Among his guides during his stay was Alessandro Pirrota, the chief gardener of the Borromean islands. At the time of Galle''s visit, the number of species and ... varieties in the gardens reached their height amounting to 3,900. Galle compared the Count''s garden to the gardens built by the Jesuit missionaries for the Chinese emperor in the seventeenth century [Qianlong emperor.] As part of his tour of the islands, Galle showed him a series of four grottoes, each of which were dedicated to cultivation of a different flower. The fourth grotto included the Convolvulus Mauritanians. The sight of the Convolvulus growing in the wild was astounding to Galle since in Nancy, they could only grow in cold greenhouses. In this vase Galle has recreated the magical experience of the Maggiore grottoes. Everything from the indigo coloration of the blooms to the crepuscular green tinged atmosphere transport the viewer to this alpine wonder. The morning glory has an added relation to Japanese culture. Commonly featured in the eighteenth century Shigemasa Kitao birds and flowers prints that Galle consulted, the creation of a jade simulant is only fitting for this oriental flower.

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French Art Nouveau cameo glass vase by Émile Gallé

French Art Nouveau "Chardons" Pâte de Verre Vase by Roussea

A French Art Nouveau "Chardons" pâte de verre vase by Gabriel Argy-Rousseau. The vase is decorated symmetrically with thistles that have deep green leaves and red flowers. A similar vase is pictured in J. Bloch-Dermont, Les Pâtes de Verre G. Argy-Rousseau Catalogue Raisonné, Paris, 1990, p. 178, no. 15.03

French Art Nouveau 'Chardons' Pâte de Verre Vase by Roussea

Art Nouveau pâte de verre "Masques" Vase by Gabriel Argy-Rousseau

A French Art Nouveau pâte de verre "Masques" vase by Gabriel Argy-Rousseau. The vase is decorated with two red masks that are framed in purple and green leaves. Provenance: Christie''s, New York, Important 20th Century Decorative Arts Including Works by Tiffany Studios, 13 June 2002, lot 39. A similar vase is pictured in J. Bloch-Dermont, Les Pâtes de Verre G. Argy-Rousseau Catalogue Raisonné, Paris, 1990, p. 178, no. 14.06.

Art Nouveau pâte de verre 'Masques' Vase by Gabriel Argy-Rousseau