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French ''Bleeding Heart'', Enameled Cameo Glass Vase

A French cameo glass "Coeur de Jeanette" vase by Muller Freres. Muller Frères displays an incredible intellectual unity between this vase''s design and it''s literary title. The "Coeur de Jeanette" was an Alsatian colloquialism for the Bleeding Heart flower. Referring to a jewelry form comprised of a Latin cross suspended from a bleeding heart, newly working young girls across Northern France would use four months of pay to make their first autonomous purchase. Crucially the purchase was made on the titular Fête de la Saint-Jean. The "Coeur de Jeannette" represented a rite of passage for young Alsatian girls, and one that is perfectly expressed by this vase''s crepuscular setting. Just as twilight denotes the border between day and night, the Fête de la Saint-Jean marked the border between girlhood and womanhood. The "Coeur de Jeanette" is an inverted baluster shaped vase that has been blown, cased, cameo-cut, wheel engraved, and enameled. The vase has a lipless rim and a splayed firing foot. A shell of opalescent glass was blown onto a core of non-lead colorless glass. The opalescent glass gives the interior a captivating rainbow iridescence that is brought out under reflected light. The gather was subsequently marvered and cased in a layer of silver nitrate amber glass, an intercalaire layer of translucent white glass and finished with a layer of translucent aubergine gl ... ass. The intercalaire layer has a spatter of powdered glass inclusions that radiates from the base to the rim. The powdered glass inclusions come in two colors: translucent fuschia pink and opaque periwinkle. The opaque periwinkle serves as a reprise to the milky color of the vase''s opalescent glass interior. The translucent aubergine glass was deeply carved, giving the veins and leaf margins the highest relief. This technique perfectly captures the transmitted light that affects leaves with frontal views and upward-facing planes. Miniscule bubbles were created on the surface of the translucent white layer by sprinkling bistre colored glass inclusions on the surface while the gather was still in a semi-molten state. In the process of blowing the vase, the base was subtly twisted clockwise from the foot, giving the viewer a sensation of rising air. Two racemes of foreground blooms were enameled in two layers. For the normal cultivars, the fuschia pink of the powdered inclusions are reprised as a layer atop the cream colored enamel, applied thickly or thinly depending on the petal''s venation, with a brush and needle. For the white "Alba" cultivar, a variation on the "grisaille" technique was used. The shadows of the petal were modeled by exposing the aubergine glass underneath. A layer of translucent "jaune d''antimoine" (antimony yellow) enamel was applied, reflecting the light of the amber colored sky. Latent in the piece is the repeated graduation of pictorial motifs, namely the graduation of the magnitude of blooms on each flower raceme, the illusion of depth created by racemes of different sizes and the graduation of the edges of the leaves towards the base and foot. The softness of the edges serve to mimic human vision in crepuscular settings. Masses become unified in tone while backlit individual objects still retain some sharpness as they silhouette against the flaxen twilight. References: Kelly, Barbara L. 2008. French music, culture, and national identity: 1870-1939. Rochester: University of Rochester Press. Baudoin, Marcel & Lacoulomere, Georges., Le Coeur Vendéen, Société d''Anthropologie de Paris, 1903

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French ''Bleeding Heart'', Enameled Cameo Glass Vase

Schlumberger for Tiffany & Co. French Mid-20th Century Lapis Lazuli and Turquoise Cuff Links

A pair of French Mid-20th Century 18 karat gold cuff links with lapis lazuli and turquoise by Jean Schlumberger for Tiffany & Co. The cuff links have a total of 22 cabochon turquoise stones set into the 4 lapis lazuli balls. Made in the Schlumberger Paris workroom. Similar pictured in The Jewels of Jean Schlumberger, by Chantal Bizot, Marie-Noel de Gary, Evelyne Posseme, Preface by Helene David-Weil, Harry N. Abrama, Inc. Publishers, 1995, page 64.

Schlumberger for Tiffany & Co. French Mid-20th Century Lapis Lazuli and Turquoise Cuff Links