Wheel-Carving

Curved, flowing lines. A description published in Pan magazine of Hermann Obrist's wall-hanging Cyclamen described it as “sudden violent curves generated by the crack of a whip,” which became well-known during the early spread of Art Nouveau. Subsequently, not only did the work itself become better-known as The Whiplash, but the term “whiplash” is frequently applied to the characteristic curves employed by Art Nouveau artists. Such decorative “whiplash” motifs formed by dynamic, undulating, and flowing lines in a syncopated rhythm, are found throughout the architecture, painting, sculpture, and other forms of Art Nouveau design. Sometimes referred to as tensile line.



 

News

3/26/2018
Macklowe Gallery Lends Finest Art Deco Jewelry to Nassau ...

New York, NY – (March 26, 2018): The period between the First and Second World Wars was a time of radical transformation in modern life. Art, fashion, and globalization all played key roles in defining the  More>>

3/17/2018
Gervois Asks Ben Macklowe: "What Was It Like Growing ...

Gervois Magazine Asks Ben Macklowe to Describe the Origins of His Passion for Collecting Antiques Gervois Magazine – the official publication of Gervois Hotel Rating – is a quarterly digital  More>>

Events

Nassau County Museum of Art

Anything Goes: The Jazz Age in Art, Music and Literature On display from March 24th through July 8th in Anything Goes: The Jazz Age a new exhibit celebrating the roaring 1920s

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