Pâte-De-Verre

An object made from a paste of ground or crushed glass which is caste into a mold and fired until solid. The advantage of pâte-de-verre is that it allows for precise placement of particular glass colors in the mold. The technique dates back to the ancient Egyptians, but it was revived in the late 19th century by French glassmakers, notably Argy-Rousseau and Almeric Walter, who gave the warm glass technique its current name. Many of the pieces that were made using this technique were relatively small, elaborately decorated, and required more than one firing before they were complete.



 

News

3/26/2018
Macklowe Gallery Lends Finest Art Deco Jewelry to Nassau ...

New York, NY – (March 26, 2018): The period between the First and Second World Wars was a time of radical transformation in modern life. Art, fashion, and globalization all played key roles in defining the  More>>

3/17/2018
Gervois Asks Ben Macklowe: "What Was It Like Growing ...

Gervois Magazine Asks Ben Macklowe to Describe the Origins of His Passion for Collecting Antiques Gervois Magazine – the official publication of Gervois Hotel Rating – is a quarterly digital  More>>

Events

Nassau County Museum of Art

Anything Goes: The Jazz Age in Art, Music and Literature On display from March 24th through July 8th in Anything Goes: The Jazz Age a new exhibit celebrating the roaring 1920s

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