Iridescent Glass

Iridescence is an optical phenomenon of surfaces in which hue changes in correspondence with the angle from which a surface is viewed.This phenomenon occurs naturally in glass which has been buried for a long time, such as Middle Eastern and Roman glass. A handful of European glass makers experimented with imitating the look in the nineteenth century, but it was Louis Comfort Tiffany’s favrile glass, patented in 1894 that achieved the full effect. The iridescence is produced by covering the glass surface with metallic oxides and reducing it by heating using carbon monoxide fumes. Common metallic oxides include gold, which creates a ruby luster, silver for a yellow luster, platinum for a silvery luster, and copper or bismuth.


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1/26/2018
The Butterfly Effect: Ben Macklowe Discusses Mystery Behind ...

In the January 2018 issue of Avenue, columnist Carol Brodie features an ornate French Art Nouveau 18-karat gold and enamel butterfly brooch from Macklowe Gallery In Hidden Gems, Brodie speaks with President  More>>

1/8/2018
ATG Features Winter Antiques Show Exhibitor Macklowe Gallery

Long-time Winter Antiques Show exhibitor, Macklowe Gallery, is featured in the January issue of Antiques Trade Gazette. Editor Katherine Boyle sits down with President Benjamin Macklowe, who describes the “enduring  More>>

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